London Missionary Society – Gleanings From Many Lands

George Cousins [1842-?], Gleanings From Many Fields, 3rd edn.This book represents a summary of the achievements of the London Missionary Society over 100 years since its foundation. It is drawn from accounts of its workers across the all the countries that the L.M.S. had worked in. There are fifty illustrations in this volume. My thanks to Redcliffe College for providing me with a copy of the book to scan. This title is in the public domain.

George Cousins [1842-?], Gleanings From Many Fields, 3rd edn. London: London Missionary Society, 1896. Hbk. pp.216. [Click to download complete book in PDF]

Contents

  • Preface
  1. Natives and Native Ways
  2. Cruel Customs That Christ is Conquering
  3. Child Life and Amusements
  4. Stories of Wild Beasts
  5. Perils by Land and Water
  6. In the Land of Idols
  7. Progress in “The Middle Kingdom”
  8. Light in the Great Dark Continent
  9. Madagascar and the Malagasy
  10. Isles of the Southern Ocean
  11. Rescuing the Negroes of the West Indies
  12. Faithful Unto Death
  13. Native Workers For Christ
  14. Schools and Scholars
  15. Among the Sick and Suffering
  16. Women to the Rescue

Chapter 1: Natives and Native Ways

The South Sea Islanders, like many of their more civilized fellow-creatures, are very fond of feasting. They believe m p1es and puddings quite as much as. you do, and not only at Christmas time, but at all seasons of the year. Theirs, however, are much larger than yours. Fancy a pie ten or twelve feet round! And a roly-poly three hundred feet long, and about as thick as a man’s body! You could not eat many of those Christmas pies, or many slices of those puddings, I am sure! It would not be a very easy matter to make and cook such large pies and puddings in England, but the natives find no difficulty in making or eating them. To make the puddings, they simply dig a trench, fill it with wood, upon which they place stones. [Continue reading]

Africa Inland Mission Work in Central Africa

Daniel Morison Miller [1888-1965], Central Africa Revisited. A 16,000 Mile Tour Thoughout the Fields of the Africa Inland Mission in Kenya, Tanganyika, Uganda, Congo, Sudan and EgyptDaniel Miller [1888-1965] was the Deputation and Editorial Secretary of the Africa Inland Mission (A.I.M.). In the 1930s he undertook a 16,000 mile tour of A.I.M. stations in Africa and this book records what he found. My thanks to the team at Africa Inland Missions’ UK office who established that no living descendant of the author could be located. If anyone knows who might have inherited the rights to this title, please contact me. My thanks to Redcliffe College for providing me with a copy of the book to scan.

Daniel Morison Miller [1888-1965], Central Africa Revisited. A 16,000 Mile Tour Thoughout the Fields of the Africa Inland Mission in Kenya, Tanganyika, Uganda, Congo, Sudan and Egypt. London: Africa Inland Mission / London & Edinburgh: Marshall, Morgan & Scott, [1938]. Hbk. pp.121. [Click to download complete book in PDF]

Contents

  • Preface
  • Foreword
  1. Africa Through the Years
  2. The Journey Out
  3. Through Mountainous Kenya
  4. The Eldoret Area
  5. In Western Tanganyika
  6. Across the Waterways of Uganda
  7. Back in the Belgian Congo
  8. Through Egypt Via Upper and Lower Sudan
  9. The Goal
  • Epilogue

From the Dust Jacket

A record of a 16,000 mile tour through East and Central Africa. The scenes are vividly portrayed and include descriptions of:- Kenya, with its lofty mountains and picturesque tribes; the Eldoret Area on the edge of the rift valley populated by the “Cliff-dwellers” and other nomadic tribes; Tanganyika with its peace loving Basukumu, living among fantastic rocks and rolling plains. Crossing  Uganda, with its numerous waterways, a pause is made in the West Nile district to review a remarkable piece of missionary work; then follows a description of the Belgian Congo in its tropical setting, inhabited by a great variety of people. The writer turning homewards follows the winding course of the White Nile for 1,300 miles to Khartoum; crosses the scorching desert to the rainless area around Shellal, through Egypt and thus home. [Continue reading]

Warneck’s Outline of a History of Protestant Missions

Gustav Warneck [1834-1910], Outline of a History of Protestant Missions From the Reformation to the Present TimeGustav Warneck [1834-1910] provides an overview of Protestant missions from the Reformation to the end of the 19th Century. Part 1 covers the period chronologically and Part 2 geographically. The original had some pen underlining which it was not possible to remove. My thanks to Redcliffe College for providing a copy of the book to scan. This title is in the public domain.

Gustav Warneck [1834-1910], Outline of a History of Protestant Missions From the Reformation to the Present Time. With an Appendix concerning Roman Catholic Missions, 3rd edn. London & Edinburgh: Oliphant Anderson & Ferrier, 1906. Hbk. pp.435. [Download complete book in PDF]

Contents

  • Part I. Missionary Life at Home

  1. Introduction
  2. The Age of the Reformation
  3. The Age of Orthodoxy
  4. The Age of Pietism
  5. The Present Age of Missions
  6. History of the Foundation and Growth of Missionary Societies
  • Appendix to Part I: Roman Catholic Missions
  • Part II. The Field of Evangelical Missions

    Introduction

  1. America
  2. Africa
  3. The Old Oriental Churches
  4. Asia
  5. Oceania

Introduction

Christian missions are as old .as Christianity itself. The missionary idea, indeed, is much older. In affirming an eternal origin for the Divine decree of salvation, Paul affirms it equally for the universality of salvation (Eph, iii 1-12). God, who called the universe into being) designed His whole creation from all eternity for a universal salvation. Therefore did He not only create a human race after His own likeness,, which is of one blood dwelling over the whole earth, but this human race, formed after His likeness, and one, He made to be in its totality the object of His saving love which is determined· in Christ. [Continue reading]

Thomas Hughes’s Biography of David Livingstone

Thomas Hughes [1822-1896], David LivingstoneDavid Livingstone (19 March 1813 – 1 May 1873) is regarded by some as the greatest British Missionary to Africa. This is Thomas Hughes biography of Livingstone written in 1889. My thanks to Redcliffe College for making a copy of the book available for scanning. This title is in the public domain.

Thomas Hughes [1822-1896], David Livingstone. London & New York: MacMillan & Co., 1889. Hbk. pp.208. [Click to download complete book in PDF]

Contents

  1. David Livingstone
  2. Start in Africa – Kuruman
  3. Kolobeng – Lake Ngai – The Zambesi
  4. Linyanti and the Makololo
  5. Across Africa – Loanda to Quilemane
  6. Home
  7. The Zambesi Expedition – To Linynti amd Back
  8. The Universities Mission
  9. Recall – Voyage to India
  10. Second Visit Home
  11. Lakes Moero, Bangweolo, and Tanganyika
  12. Stanley
  13. To Unyanyembe with Stanley
  14. Wating at Unyanyembe
  15. The Last Advance – Death
  16. Conclusion

Chapter 1

“My own inclination would lead me to say as little as possible about myself.” With these words the greatest explorer of modern times begins that account of his missionary journeys and researches in South Africa which electrified England. The eager desire of his countrymen to know all they could about himself, induced him to modify his own inclination so far as to devote six pages of his famous book to the history of his family, and of the early years of his own life up to the time of his sailing for the Cape at the age of twenty-three. This reticence is as characteristic of the man as are the few facts he does disclose. Foremost of these stands: “My great-grandfather fell at the battle of Culloaen, fighting for the old line of kings, and my grandfather was a small farmer in Ulva, where my father was born.” [Continue reading]

 

Stories of a Slave-Boy Illustrating the Universities’ Mission to Central Africa

Robert Keable [1887-1927], The Adventures of Paul Kangai. Stories of a Slave-Boy, Illustrating the Universities' Mission to Central AfricaThe Adventures of Paul Kangai is a fictionalised account of African life written to provide an insight into the work of the Universities’ Mission to Central Africa. My thanks to Redcliffe College for providing a copy of this book for digitisation. This book is in the public domain.

Robert Keable [1887-1927], The Adventures of Paul Kangai. Stories of a Slave-Boy, Illustrating the Universities’ Mission to Central Africa. London: Universities Mission to Central Africa, 1918. Hbk. pp.145. [Click to download complete book in PDF]

Contents

  1. How Kangai Lost his Father
  2. How Kangai Stalked a Snake and Fond a Stick Beside it
  3. How Kangai Learned Many Things and Set Out For the Blue Water
  4. How Kangai Ate Ship’s Biscuits and Met my Lord Bishop
  5. How Kangai Changed His Name and the Bell Awoke Msamya
  6. How Paul Got Back His Silver Box
  7. How Paul Met Old Enemies and an Old Friend
  8. How Paul Heard “Maadui” Cried Again and Marched Behind the Drums

Chapter 1: How Kangai Lost His Father

On a big river one broiling hot day in Central Africa an unusual quiet had fallen. Five minutes before, a big band of men, armed with spears and shields and bows and arrows, had come down through the trees on the bank, had sprung out on to the big flat stones where the water lapped and gurgled as it rushed by, had beaten the pools with their spears to scare the crocodiles, and had then crossed all together. [Continue reading]

Problem of Africa’s Evangelisation

Douglas M. Thornton [1873-1907], Africa Waiting or The Problem of Africa's EvangelisationDouglas M. Thornton wrote this book to draw attention to the extent of the unfinished task of the evangelisation of Africa. The book also includes a bibliography of 19th Century books on Africa. My thanks to Redcliffe College for providing me with a copy of the book to digitise. This title is in the public domain.

Douglas M. Thornton [1873-1907], Africa Waiting or The Problem of Africa’s Evangelisation. London: Student Volunteer Missionary Union, 1897. Hbk. pp.148. [Click to download the complete book in PDF]

Contents

  • Preface
  • An African Bibliography
  1. The Geography of Africa
  2. Native Races, Languages, and Religions
  3. North Africa, Egypt and Abyssinia
  4. Negro-Land: The Great Sudan
  5. Bantu-Land: Central Africa
  6. South Africa and British Central Africa
  7. The Slave Trade and the Drink Traffic
  8. The Evangelization of Africa

Appendices

  • A. Rules for the Preservation of Health in the Tropics
  • B. Bible Translations (1837-1897)
  • C. West African Missionary Statistics
  • D. The Modern Marvel of Missions

Preface

The sole object in preparing this little book is to call the attention of Christians generally, and students in particular, to the problem of Africa’s evangelization. Issuing as it does from the British Student Volunteer Missionary Union, as a text-book upon Africa, its scope naturally includes all Protestant missionary effort. Nothing, however, but lack of opportunity for further study has caused the omission of the consideration of modern Romish Missions in Africa.

Though intended primarily for the use of members of Missionary Bands, Lay Workers’ and Helpers’ Unions, Watchers’ Bands, Christian Endeavourers, &c., it is hoped that it will also prove of value to the Christian public and to African Missionaries. Nothing of the kind, so far as we know, is to be found in print. There is an abundance of general works upon Africa, but none that we have seen solely from a missionary standpoint. [Continue reading]

Progress of Missions in the Hundred Years After Carey

Delavan L. Leonard [1834-1917], A Hundred Years of Missions or The Story of Progress Since Carey's BeginningAlthough Delavan Leonard’s history of missions covers early church and medieval missions, his primary focus is in “The Great Century” following William Carey. He provides an overview of progress of the Great Commission by Continent as well as a chapter of work still to be done. My thanks to Redcliffe College for providing me with a copy of this book to scan. This title is in the public domain.

Delavan L. Leonard [1834-1917], A Hundred Years of Missions or The Story of Progress Since Carey’s Beginning. New York: Funk & Wagnalls Co., 1895. Hbk. pp.430.  [Click to download complete book in PDF]

Contents

  • Preface
  • Introduction
  1. The Christian Idea of Missions
  2. Missions in the Early Centuries
  3. Conversion of Northern and Western Europe
  4. The Non-Missionary Centuries
  5. Reformation ad Discovery of America
  6. Roman Catholic Missions
  7. Preparation For Foreign Missions
  8. Protestant Missions Before Carey
  9. The Carey Epoch
  10. The Great Missionary Revival
  11. Genesis of Missions in America
  12. The Phenomenon of Missionary Expansion
  13. Missions in India
  14. Missions in Africa; Madagascar
  15. The Islands of the Sea
  16. Turkish Empire: Persia
  17. Chinese Empire’ Korea
  18. Missions in Japan
  19. Missions in Spanish America
  20. Missions Among the American Indians
  21. The Land Which Remains to be Possessed

Introduction

It is sometimes a question how far an introduction helps the book it introduces. If the author is well known he needs no such formal entrance into the literary world; if he is as yet unfamiliar to a wide circle of readers, his book itself is his best recommendation.

Dickens used to say that it was an easy thing to ” come out into society, but a difficult thing to prevent going in again.” And so a book or an author that proves unworthy of the introduction to the public, cannot long float, notwithstanding the outside supports intended to give it buoyancy. [Continue reading]

Flaming Torch in Darkest Africa by Bishop William Taylor

William Taylor [1821-1902], The Flaming Torch in Darkest AfricaWilliam Taylor [1821-1902] was missionary bishop of Africa from 1884 to 1896. This book attempts to provide a history of Africa from earliest times until the end of the Nineteenth Century. It includes a description of the exploratory work of David Livingstone, native religions and the progress of missionary work in the Nineteenth Century. There are numerous unique photographs and images. These and the large format of book make the download quite large (29MB). My thanks to Redcliffe College for providing a copy of this book to scan. This title is in the Public Domain.

William Taylor [1821-1902], The Flaming Torch in Darkest Africa. New York: Eaton & Mains, 1898. Hbk. pp.675. [Click to download the complete book in PDF]

Contents

Preface
List of Illustrations
Introduction

First Division

The Dark Land
Ancient Africa
The Invasions of Islam

Second Division

The Portuguese and Dutch
England and France Explore Africa
An African Association
Mungo Park
Horneman, Campbell, Tuckey,etc.
The New Era
About Lake Tchad
In Campbell’s Footsteps

Third Division

Livingstone’s Discoveries
Stanley’s Discoveries

Fourth Division

Islam and the Natives
Commercial and Domestic
The Kaffirs a Century Ago
Native Religion and Fetichism
Worship of the Yorubas
Human Sacrifices
Cruel Native Tyrants – Uganda’s Despot and Sepopo
Sacrified to Crocodiles
The Zulus and “Judicial” Murders
Religious Supersititions in Garenganze
The Legendary Lore
Folk Takes of Angola

Fifth Division

To a Sure Foundation
Apostolic and Early Modern Missions
Christianizing Wild Tribes
Increase of the Advancing Host
Scotch Missions and Methods
Abyssinia and Uganda
Triumphs in Madagascar
The Gospel in Mohammedan Centers
Land of the White Man’s Grave
The Gospel on the Gold Coast
Missions West and Southwest
Light in the Valley of the Congo
The Gospel in South Central Africa
Mission to Garenganze
Methodist Industrial Missions
Practical Principals of Self-Support
Fate of the First Party
The Church in the Wilderness
Missionary Heroes and Heroines
Heroes of the Congo
Early Days of the Republic of Liberia
Heathen Tribes on the Cavalla
Advance up the Sinoe River
Kroo Coast Experiences
The Gospel in Tonga
The Torch in a Strong Hand
My Latest Evangelistic Tour

Sixth Division

Africa’s Partition and Promise
Dr. Ravenstein’s Political Division of Africa in1893
Africa: Present and Future
Africa’s People and Languages
The Open Sore
The Mines at Kimberley
Retribution and Restitution

Pioneering for Christ in the Sudan – Johanna Veenstra

Johanna Veenstra [1894-1933], Pioneering for Christ in the SudanJohanna Veenstra tells the story of her life of service in Africa. Note that Sudan at that time referred to huge tract of land stretching across the centre of Africa and not just the boundaries of the modern nation of that name. There are a number of unique photographs contained in this volume which I have attempted to reproduce as clearly as possible. My thanks to Redcliffe College for providing me with a copy of this book to scan. This title is in the public domain.

Johanna Veenstra [1894-1933], Pioneering for Christ in the Sudan. London & Edinburgh: Marshall Brothers Ltd., [1926]. Hbk. pp.190. [Click to download in PDF]

Contents

Farewell
The Call to Service
Preparation for Service – I
Preparation for Service – II
“In Journeyings Often…”
The Call of the Sudan
Getting Acquainted
Entering the Cannibal District
The Power of Spirit Worship
The Moral Life of the Dzompere
“In Perils in the Wilderness – I”
“In Perils in the Wilderness – II”
The Task of a Pioneer Missionary
The Dispensary Work of Lupwe
The Boarding School at Lupwe
Evangelistic Work
First Fruits
The First Convert From Among the Dzompere
“Suffer the Little Children to Come”
A Few Questions Answered
Problems and Difficulties
“Is it Nothing to You?”

Preface

When coming home for this second furlough, there was not even a remote desire in my heart to write a book and tell of my experiences during five years of service in the Dark Continent; I have never thought myself capable of performing such a task; and even now I hesitate to set this work before the public.

One day this summer our kind Director of Missions, Dr. H. Beets (Christian Reformed Church), approached me on this subject of writing a book. At first his suggestion made no impression whatsoever upon my mind. Later on I was confronted with the fact that I was compelled to refuse many invitations to speak in the different churches and tell of the Lord’s work in the Sudan. For lack of time it became impossible to travel about in so many states of the Union and in Canada, to reach all the people interested in the spread of the gospel in this needy field. A physical complication – overstrain of the vocal cords – also forced me to limit the amount of speaking appointments. [Continue reading]

 

Livingstone and the Exploration of Central Africa

Sir H.H. Johnston [1858-1927], Livingstone and the Exploration of Central AfricaDavid Livingstone [1813-1873], pioneer medical missionary and explorer is probably the best known of Victorian missionaries. This biography is a “cheap edition” of a volume that originally appeared as part of a series about the world’s greatest explorers and was republished in this format to mark the centenary of Livingstone’s birth. My thanks to Redcliffe College for providing me with a copy to digitise. This book is now in the public domain.

Sir H.H. Johnston [1858-1927], Livingstone and the Exploration of Central Africa. London: George Philip & Son, Ltd., 1912. Hbk. pp.372. [Click to download complete volume in PDF]

Contents

Publisher’s Note

  1. Central Africa – Natural History
  2. Central Africa – Human History
  3. The Hour and the Man: Livingstone’s Upbringing
  4. First Impressions of the Missionary Life
  5. Marries, Teaches, and is Troubled
  6. The Boers, “God’s Chosen People”
  7. Mission-Work; Its Failures and Successes
  8. Missionary Becomes Explorer
  9. Betshuanaland
  10. Fever, Tsetse-Fly, and Horse-Sickness
  11. From the Zambesi to Angola
  12. From Loanda to Quilimane – Across Africa
  13. The Zambesi
  14. Livingstone Returns to England
  15. The Second Zambezi Expedition
  16. Last Visit to England
  17. Four Great Lakes and a Mighty River
  18. The Manyema and Their Land
  19. Stanley Relieves Livingstone
  20. The Death of Livingstone

Chapter 1: Central Africa – Natural History

The history of the southern half of the African continent has widely differed from the northern portion as regards the manner and period in which it has been explored and made known by rates higher than the Negro. More than that, the Negroes inhabiting the long half of the Dark Continent which lies to the south of an irregular border-line commencing at the Cameroons of the West Coast, and passing across the continent to the East Coast at Mombasa, present two very distinct language-stocks, which are totally unrepresented in the northern half of Africa For convenience, I shall call this line dividing Northern from southern Africa the “Bantu Border line,” because it coincides exactly ·with the northern limit of the Bantu language-field. [Continue reading]