Story of Regions Beyond Missionary Union

Harry Guinness [1835-1910], These Thirty Years. The Story of the R.B.M.U.The Regions Beyond Missionary Union was founded by Henry Grattan Guinness and his wife Fanny in 1873. Its thousands of workers served in South America, Central Africa, India, Nepal and Irian Jaya. This book by the founder of the mission tells the story of the first 30 years.

My thanks to Redcliffe College for providing a copy of the book to scan. This title is in the public domain.

Harry Guinness [1835-1910], These Thirty Years. The Story of the R.B.M.U. London: The Regions Beyond Missionary Union, 1903. Hbk. pp.106. [Click to download complete book in PDF]

Contents

  • Preface
  • These Thirty Years
  • The Child Grew
  • Our Training Institutions
  • The Congo Balolo Mission
  • How Much Longer
  • At Work in the Neglected Continent
  • The Scorn of Job
  • Piercing the Darkness of Peru
  • The Quichua’s Appeal
  • Amongst India’s Millions
  • Our Helpers
  • Strengthening the Stakes
  • A Harley College Group
  • How the Money Comes
  • Our Deputation Secretaries
  • Our Children’s Home
  • The Sleeping Sickness; or, Negro Lethargy
  • Vigilante

Preface

The warm appreciation elicited by the earlier edition of “These Thirty “Years,” has encouraged us to conserve in permanent form this special issue of ” Regions Beyond.” A few emendations and improvements have been effected, and an important supplementary chapter added. Our readers will find that instead of a formal report for 1902, we compiled an illustrated survey of the entire work of the R.B.M.U. Our only regret was that lack of space compelled us to omit all reference to the noble efforts of the men and women who have gone forth from our midst to become identified with other Missionary societies, and in some instances to establish Independent Missions in hitherto unreached spheres.

The record was sent forth with the earnest prayer that it might stimulate a deeper interest in the Missions identified with Harley House, and we gratefully acknowledge the kindness and sympathy with which it has been received. Those who still desire to help us can render effective service by introducing this volume to Christian people who may not be acquainted with the work. We shall greatly appreciate any such effort to widen our circle of helpers. [Continue reading]

Further information about R.B.M.U. can be found on the Mundus website.

Protestant Missions in South America to 1900

Harlan P. Beach, F.P.L. Josa, J. Taylor Hamilton, H.C. Tucker, C.W. Drees, I.H. La Fetra, T.B. Wood & T.S. Pond, Protestant Missions in South America
Endpiece: Missionary Map of South America. Click image to download larger version

This college textbook covers the progress of Protestant Missions up to 1900 in most of the countries of South America. It also includes a superb colour map as an endpiece. My thanks to Redcliffe College for providing me with a copy if the book to scan. This title is in the public domain.

Harlan P. Beach, F.P.L. Josa, J. Taylor Hamilton, H.C. Tucker, C.W. Drees, I.H. La Fetra, T.B. Wood & T.S. Pond, Protestant Missions in South America. New York: Student Volunteer Movement, 1907. Hbk. pp.239. [Click to download complete book in PDF]

Contents

Preface

  1. Geographical and General. By Harlan P. Beach
  2. British Guiana. By Canon F.P.L. Josa
  3. Dutch Guiana, or Surinam. By Prof. J. Taylor Hamilton
  4. Brazil. By H.C. Tucker
  5. Republics of the Plata River. By Rev. C.W. Drees
  6. Chile. By Rev. I.H. La Fetra
  7. The Land of the Incas. By Rev. T.B. Wood
  8. Colombia. By Mrs T.S. Pond
  9. Veneszuela. By Mrs. T.S. Pond
  10. South America as a Mission Field. By Rev. T.B. Wood
  • Appendix A. – Bibliography
  • Appendix B. – General Statistics concerning South American Countries
  • Appendix C. – South American Missionary Statistics for 1900.
  • Analytical Index
  • Map Index
  • Missionary Map of South America

Preface

This text-book is one of a series, prepared primarily for the use of mission study classes in colleges and other institutions of higher learning, but also largely for study classes in churches and young peoples’ societies. The somewhat peculiar typography and paragraph arrangement are ac-counted for by the fact that an experience of six years has proven the desirability of some such aid to the busy student or reader. The Analytical Index at the close has likewise been found useful in the class-room, as well as to the reader who desires to learn at a glance the scope of the volume. [Continue reading]

Progress of Missions in the Hundred Years After Carey

Delavan L. Leonard [1834-1917], A Hundred Years of Missions or The Story of Progress Since Carey's BeginningAlthough Delavan Leonard’s history of missions covers early church and medieval missions, his primary focus is in “The Great Century” following William Carey. He provides an overview of progress of the Great Commission by Continent as well as a chapter of work still to be done. My thanks to Redcliffe College for providing me with a copy of this book to scan. This title is in the public domain.

Delavan L. Leonard [1834-1917], A Hundred Years of Missions or The Story of Progress Since Carey’s Beginning. New York: Funk & Wagnalls Co., 1895. Hbk. pp.430.  [Click to download complete book in PDF]

Contents

  • Preface
  • Introduction
  1. The Christian Idea of Missions
  2. Missions in the Early Centuries
  3. Conversion of Northern and Western Europe
  4. The Non-Missionary Centuries
  5. Reformation ad Discovery of America
  6. Roman Catholic Missions
  7. Preparation For Foreign Missions
  8. Protestant Missions Before Carey
  9. The Carey Epoch
  10. The Great Missionary Revival
  11. Genesis of Missions in America
  12. The Phenomenon of Missionary Expansion
  13. Missions in India
  14. Missions in Africa; Madagascar
  15. The Islands of the Sea
  16. Turkish Empire: Persia
  17. Chinese Empire’ Korea
  18. Missions in Japan
  19. Missions in Spanish America
  20. Missions Among the American Indians
  21. The Land Which Remains to be Possessed

Introduction

It is sometimes a question how far an introduction helps the book it introduces. If the author is well known he needs no such formal entrance into the literary world; if he is as yet unfamiliar to a wide circle of readers, his book itself is his best recommendation.

Dickens used to say that it was an easy thing to ” come out into society, but a difficult thing to prevent going in again.” And so a book or an author that proves unworthy of the introduction to the public, cannot long float, notwithstanding the outside supports intended to give it buoyancy. [Continue reading]