Sons of Han – Stories of Chinese Life and Mission Work

Bernard William Upward [1873-1944], The Sons of Han. Stories of Chinese Life and Mission Work“Sons of Han” is a collection of stories about London Missionary Society mission work in China written for a youthful audience – and hence profusely illustrated. My thanks to Redcliffe College for providing a copy of this book to scan. This title is in the public domain.

Bernard William Upward [1873-1944], The Sons of Han. Stories of Chinese Life and Mission Work. London: Church Missionary Society, 1908. Hbk. pp.192. [Click to download complete book in PDF]

Contents

  1. Making Believe
  2. How the Gospel Came to Hankow
  3. Learning New Lessons
  4. “In Journeys Oft”
  5. From Village to Village
  6. Boys and Girls
  7. Playtime
  8. Festivals and Holidays
  9. A Day of Rejoicing
  10. Doctors and Their Patients
  11. Another Hospital, and a Visit to the Lepers
  12. The Revival of Learning

Preface

A book for young people, with plenty of pictures and stories, was asked for; and these pages of missionary commonplaces are the result.

The idea throughout has been to give an account of some of the phases of Chinese life and of mission work among this great people. With a field so wide in which to range the difficulty is altogether one of selection. Child-life is so fascinating a subject that these pages might easily have been filled with stories of children and their ways. Folk-· lore is an inviting study, and material for it abounds, yielding many a weird story. To describe fully the different branches of our mission work in Central China would, perhaps, not have been the best way to introduce the young folk, for which this little book is intended, to the study of a great people of whom the missionary can truly say that the more he knows them, the more he finds in them to love. [Continue reading]

John Kenneth Mackenzie, Medical Missionary to China

Mary F. Bryson [1855-1904], John Kenneth Mackenzie. Medical Missionary to ChinaJohn Kenneth Mackenzie [25 August 1850 – 1 April 1888] served with the London Missionary Society in China. My thanks to Redcliffe College for providing me with a copy of the book to scan. This book is in the public domain.

Mary F. Bryson [1855-1904], John Kenneth Mackenzie. Medical Missionary to China. London: Hodder & Stoughton, 1891. Hbk. pp.404. [Click to download complete book in PDF]

Contents

  • Preface
  1. Early Days
  2. Student Life and Voyage to China
  3. Life in Hankow
  4. Country Work and Persecution
  5. Light After Darkness
  6. Prejudice Overcome
  7. Lights and Shadows of Medical Mission Work
  8. Changes – A Northern Home
  9. The Power of Prayer
  10. Evangelistic Labours
  11. Chinese Medical School
  12. Signs of Progress
  13. Strange Phases of Chinese Life
  14. Glimpses of Inner Life
  15. Growing in Grace
  16. Last Things

Appendix

  1. North China – New Hospital at Tien-sin
  2. A Medical Review of Dr. Mackenzie’s Work by F.C. Roberts, M.B., C.M.
  3. “The Evangelistic Side of a Medial Mission” by Dr Mackenzie, Contributed to “China Medical Missionary Journal,” Vol. i, No,1.
  4. “The Double Cure” by Dr. Mackenzie. Contributed to China “Medical Missionary Journal,” vol. ii, No. 1.

Preface

It was on the early morning of Easter Day 1888 that, after thirteen years of active service in China, Dr. Mackenzie was suddenly called to rest from his labours.

During this time he had been used by God in a wonderful way to overcome the great prejudice existing in China against Western medical science, and was the means of founding and conducting the first Government medical school in the Empire.

His labours, indeed, had no small share in giving that impetus towards foreign methods in medicine and surgery which has of late been so noticeable. But while thus singularly successful as a physician, it was in the consecration of all his powers to the attainment of a yet higher end than even the healing of bodily disease that Dr. Mackenzie was specially remarkable. [Continue reading]

Glances at China by Rev. Gilbert Reid

Gilbert Reid [1857-1927], Glances at China

Glances at China is a profusely illustrated overview of China and its people, clearly written with Christian missionary activity there in mind. My thanks to to Redcliffe College for providing me with a copy of this book to scan. This title is in the public domain.

Gilbert Reid [1857-1927], Glances at China. London: The Religious Tract Society, [1892]. Hbk. pp.191. [This material is in the Public Domain]

Contents

  1. The First Step at China
  2. Life in a Chinese Treaty-Port
  3. The Food Eaten in Cathay
  4. The Chinese New Year’s Day
  5. The Chinese Feast of Lanterns
  6. The Story of a Chinese Teacher
  7. A Christian Wedding With Chinese Appendages
  8. A Visit to the City of Ningpo
  9. Travelling in China
  10. The Romance of a Chinese Inn
  11. The Salams and Ceremony of Itineration in China
  12. Chinese Christians Among the Mountains
  13. An Amateur Itineration in China
  14. The Religions of China
  15. Three Important Chinese Dynasties
  16. A Visit to the Great Wall of China
  17. The Imperial City of Peking
  18. From Treaty-Port to Provincial Captial
  19. Life in the Interior of China
  20. The Missionary in Chinese Costume
  21. First Experience With Chinese Mandarins
  22. Near Death’s Door in a Heathen Land
  23. Missionary Work Amid the Memories of China’s Sages
  24. A Missionary’s First Visitt to a Chinese Governor
  25. A Sacred Mountain in China
  26. First Attempt at Translation in China
  27. A Story of Riots
  28. Progressive China
  29. Mission Work in the Cities of China
  30. Chinese Attack on an American Missionary
  31. Death of Dr. Mackenzie
  32. A Peep into Chinese Politics
  33. The Telegraph in China
  34. Christianity the Great Need of China
  35. Mission Work in Cathay

Chapter 1: Peeps into China

China’s chief port, the city of Shanghai, consisting of the Chinese city proper, with a population of nearly 400,000, and the English and French ‘ concessions ‘ with 5000 foreigners and about 500,000 Chinese-Shanghai within the wall and Shanghai without the wall-has various kinds of Christian and missionary work. Different denominations of different countries here vie with each other, in the spirit of union, trying not only to break the rush of heathenism, but the brazen vices of the foreigners, many of whom ‘tarry but for a night.’ Of all this work, two samples may be given-one, at the time of visiting it, being the largest Sunday school in China, and the other the largest Mission Press in the world. [Continue reading]

Progress of Missions in the Hundred Years After Carey

Delavan L. Leonard [1834-1917], A Hundred Years of Missions or The Story of Progress Since Carey's BeginningAlthough Delavan Leonard’s history of missions covers early church and medieval missions, his primary focus is in “The Great Century” following William Carey. He provides an overview of progress of the Great Commission by Continent as well as a chapter of work still to be done. My thanks to Redcliffe College for providing me with a copy of this book to scan. This title is in the public domain.

Delavan L. Leonard [1834-1917], A Hundred Years of Missions or The Story of Progress Since Carey’s Beginning. New York: Funk & Wagnalls Co., 1895. Hbk. pp.430.  [Click to download complete book in PDF]

Contents

  • Preface
  • Introduction
  1. The Christian Idea of Missions
  2. Missions in the Early Centuries
  3. Conversion of Northern and Western Europe
  4. The Non-Missionary Centuries
  5. Reformation ad Discovery of America
  6. Roman Catholic Missions
  7. Preparation For Foreign Missions
  8. Protestant Missions Before Carey
  9. The Carey Epoch
  10. The Great Missionary Revival
  11. Genesis of Missions in America
  12. The Phenomenon of Missionary Expansion
  13. Missions in India
  14. Missions in Africa; Madagascar
  15. The Islands of the Sea
  16. Turkish Empire: Persia
  17. Chinese Empire’ Korea
  18. Missions in Japan
  19. Missions in Spanish America
  20. Missions Among the American Indians
  21. The Land Which Remains to be Possessed

Introduction

It is sometimes a question how far an introduction helps the book it introduces. If the author is well known he needs no such formal entrance into the literary world; if he is as yet unfamiliar to a wide circle of readers, his book itself is his best recommendation.

Dickens used to say that it was an easy thing to ” come out into society, but a difficult thing to prevent going in again.” And so a book or an author that proves unworthy of the introduction to the public, cannot long float, notwithstanding the outside supports intended to give it buoyancy. [Continue reading]

China Inland Mission School at Chefoo

Stanley Houghton, Edith B. Harman & Margaret Pyle, Chefoo.

“The Chefoo School (traditional Chinese: 芝罘學校; simplified Chinese: 芝罘学校; pinyin: Zhīfú Xuéxiào; Wade–Giles: Chih-fu Hsüeh-hsiao), also known as Protestant Collegiate School or China Inland Mission School, was a Christian boarding school established by the China Inland Mission—under James Hudson Taylor—at Chefoo (Yantai), in Shandong province in northern China, in 1880. Its purpose was to provide an education for the children of foreign missionaries and the foreign business and diplomatic communities in China.” – Wikipedia

This book tells the story of the Chefoo school from the time of its foundation to the 1920s. My thanks to OMF International-UK for their kind permission to place the book on-line and to Redcliffe College for providing me with a copy to scan. This book is copyright OMF International-UK.

Stanley Houghton, Edith B. Harman & Margaret Pyle, Chefoo. London: The China Inland Mission, 1931. Pbk. pp.82. [Click to download complete book in PDF]

Contents

  • Foreword
  • Editor’s Note

Part I – Today by Stanley Houghton, B.A.

  • Foundation Day
  • The School
  • The Memoerial Hall
  • Behind the Scenes
  • Some Difficulties

Part II – Yesterday by Edith B. Harman

  • 1881
  • 1888
  • 1895
  • 18900
  • 1908
  • 1910-1911
  • 1911-1912
  • 1914-1918

Part III – Its Tomorrow’s by Margaret Pyle

  • Its Tomorrows

APPENDIX

  • What I Owe to Chefoo

Foreword

“Little is much if God is in it.” Who, fifty years ago, looking at that class of three boys, gathered in a small room in the doctor’s house, could have foretold what great proportions would be attained from such a small beginning? But “with God all things are possible”, and to-day, in this our Jubilee Year, we thank God for His grace given to Mr. Hudson Taylor and Mr. Elliston that they did not “despise the day of small things”, for to them and to each member of the China Inland Mission, in the succeeding years, has been given the joy of watching the expansion of the work. They have not needed to wait for the time of rejoicing until maturity had been reached. [Continue reading]

In Memory of Hudson Taylor

Marshall Broomhall [1866-1937], ed., In Memoriam: Rev. J. Hudson Taylor M.R.C.S. Beloved Founder and Director of the China Inland MissionThis book is a collection of addresses made at Hudson Taylor’s Memorial service at the Conference Hall in Mildmay, London in 1905. He was a man who touched thousands of lives for Christ, and this is reflected in the reminiscences of those who knew him well.

My thanks to OMF International-UK for their kind permission to places this book on-line and to Redcliffe College for providing a copy for digitisation. This book is copyright OMF International-UK.

Marshall Broomhall [1866-1937], ed., In Memoriam: Rev. J. Hudson Taylor M.R.C.S. Beloved Founder and Director of the China Inland Mission. London: China Inland Mission, 1905. Hbk. pp.104. [Click to download complete book in PDF]

Contents

  • In Memoriam – Poem. By Dr. A.T. Pierson
  • Reminiscences. By B. Broomhall
  • Memorial Service: Programme
  • Memorial Service: Representatives
  • Address. By Theodore Howard, Esq.
  • Address. By J.E. Mathieson, Esq.
  • Address. By Eugene Stock, Esq.
  • Address. By Rev. John Sharp
  • Address. By Rev. R. Wardlaw Thompson
  • Address. By Dr. Harry Guiness
  • Address. By W.B. Sloan, Esq.
  • Tribute. By Dr. Arthur T. Pierson
  • Letters: Personal and Official
  • Press Notices

Preface

To many thousands of persons the news of Mr. Hudson Taylor’s Home-call has come as a personal sorrow. As a leader and teacher, one of the most prominent features in his life has been the power to create a  bond of esteem and affection between himself and others. His loyalty to God and to His cause, together with the largeness of his sympathies, have gained for him a large circle of friends among the choicest of God’s people all over the world.

In the belief that to many of these a  small “In Memoriam” volume would be welcome, this little book has been compiled. [Continue reading]

God’s Deliverance from the Boxer Uprising

Alexander R. Saunders, A God of Deliverances. The Story of the Marvellous Deliverances Through the Sovereign Power of God of a Party of Missionaries, When Compelled by the Boxer Rising to Flee From Shan-Si, North ChinaThe Boxer Uprising (a.k.a. the Yihequan Movement) of 1899-1901 was  one to the darkest  hours for missionaries in China. This little book recounts how some of the China Inland Mission workers were able to escape the hands of the Boxers. My thanks to OMF International-UK for their kind permission to place this book on-line and to Redcliffe College for providing a copy to scan. This title is copyright OMF International-UK.

Alexander R. Saunders, A God of Deliverances. The Story of the Marvellous Deliverances Through the Sovereign Power of God of a Party of Missionaries, When Compelled by the Boxer Rising to Flee From Shan-Si, North China. London: China Inland Mission, [1901]. Hbk. pp.88. [Click to download complete book in PDF]

Contents

  • Preface by Rev J. Hudson Taylor, M.R.C.S., F.R.G.S.
  1. Before the Riot
  2. The Flight to the Yamen
  3. Within a Step of Death
  4. Our Second Riot
  5. A Spectacle to Men and to Angels
  6. Prisoners of the Lord
  7. Two Martyrs
  8. Wonders at the Yellow River
  9. Sorrow Upon Sorrow
  10. Safe Home at Last

Chapter 1 0 – Before the riot

”Beloved, think it not strange concerning the fiery trial which is to try you.”-1 Peter iv. 12.

The city of P’ing-yao was opened as a station by the China Inland Mission in 1888. Being the banking centre for China, its position is important, and it subsequently became the business centre for the C.I.M. in Central Shan-si. During the twelve years of missionary work in this station, 133 persons have been baptized. With these Christians organised under eight separate congregations, all paying their own expenses, and in two cases with chapels mort-gaged by native contributions, and with nearly 100 candidates waiting for baptism, the Lord’s work had never seemed more encouraging than just prior to the Boxer rising.

In consequence of information received concerning the Boxer troubles in Shan-tong, I was led, during the earlier part of the year, to speak much to the Christians on the subject of persecution and affliction for Christ’s sake, and one cannot but praise God for having been led so to do. [Continue reading]

Wesleyan Medical Missions in China to 1909

W. Arthur Tatchell [1869-1937], Medical Missions in China. In Connexion with the Wesleyan Methodist Church with Forty-Six IllustrationsArthur Tatchell’s history of medical missions in China is illustrated with 46 photographs which have been scanned in greyscale to preserve their quality. My thanks to Redcliffe College for providing me with a copy of the book to scan. This title is in the Public Domain.

W. Arthur Tatchell [1869-1937], Medical Missions in China. In Connexion with the Wesleyan Methodist Church with Forty-Six Illustrations. London: Robert Culley, [1909]. Hbk. pp.351. [Click to download complete book in PDF]

Contents

Introduction.
An Appreciation by the Hon. E.H. Fraser, C.M.B., H.B.M. Consul-General, Hankow

  1. ‘The Tender Mercies of the Heathen – Are Cruel’
  2. A Brief Survey of Medical Missions in ChinaCentral China: The Province North of the Lake
  3. The Mouth of the Han
  4. Resuscitation
  5. The City of Virtue and Peace
  6. Work for Suffering Women
  7. The City of Military Glory
  8. Recent AdvancesCentral China: The Province South of the Lake
  9. A Long-Closed DoorSouth China
  10. Buddha’s Hill
  11. The ‘Tree of the Phoenix’ City
  12. The ‘Shiu’ Barrier City
  13. Of Past and Present Medical Missionaries

Introduction

This is a Story, and not a medical treatise.’ Neither does it’ profess to be a literary production. Those gifts and graces which make for such are obviously absent. Medical men are not generally guilty of increasing the yearly output of. books on subjects outside of their own conservative sphere. Their work is usually confined to ‘ things earthy,’ and their thoughts revolve around hard facts. Such are not always adorned with literary charms.

The various parts of this skeleton have been collected from numerous sources, and, as far as is here seen, we have tried to add flesh and life. Whether we have succeeded or not remains to be proved.

The writing of this Story has· not only been a joy but also a labour of love. It has been performed during the multitudinous dudes and cares connected with large hospital practices. Never have we been able to devote two consecutive hours to the writing of the Story. Of the blemishes and omissions we are only too painfully conscious. Hence, no literary critics need intensify our sufferings. [Continue reading]

Griffith John Founder of the Hankow Mission Central China

William Robson, Griffith John. Founder of the Hankow Mission to Central ChinaGriffith John [1831-1912] was a Welsh Congregationalist who served with the London Missionary Society in Central China. He is notable for his courageous evangelistic tours into dangerous regions of China, for his work as a writer and Bible translator. My thanks to Redcliffe College for providing me with a copy of the book to scan. THisbook is in the Public Domain.

William Robson, Griffith John. Founder of the Hankow Mission to Central China. London: S.W. Partridge & Co., n.d. Hbk. pp.176. [Click to download complete text in PDF]

Contents

  1. The Boy Preacher of Wales – Losing and Gaining a Father by the Same Grave – Covenanting to be a Missionary
  2. Shanghai – Buckling on His Armour
  3. The Taiping Rebellion
  4. Founding of the Hankow Mission
  5. Native Helpers – Mission Hospital Established – Specimen Converts
  6. Tour of 3,000 Miles Through the Provinces of Si-chuen and Shen-si to Wuchang – Visit to England – Return, and Death of Mrs John
  7. Literary Work
  8. Second Marriage – Stoned by the Heathen – Endued with “Power From on High” – Continued Success – Death of Mrs John
  9. Interesting Chapel Openings – A Remarkable Proclamation – Happy Deaths
  10. Honours For Mr John – The Years 1888 to 1901 – Missionary ours in Hupeh – Planting the Gospel Standard in Hanan – A Retrospect

Preface

The introduction of Protestant Missions into the interior of China is of such recent date that the most eminent pioneers of that movement are still living.

Not only was Griffith John the first to preach in Hankow, and to carry the Gospel into the provinces of Si-chuen, Shan-si, and the capitals of other provinces which were long closed to missionaries by the obstinate pride of the officials and literati, but his eloquence as a preacher, his literary attainments, and the tact and adroitness displayed in dealing with officials of the government, combine to place him foremost on the list of Chinese missionaries.  [Continue reading]

Martyred Missionaries of the China Inland Mission

Marshall Broomhall [1866-1937], Martyred Missionaries of the China Inland Mission with a Record of the Perils & Sufferings of Some Who EscapedOne of the most poignant periods of mission history took place as part of the Boxer Rebellion in China between 1899 and 1901. Thousands of native Chinese Christians and many members of the China Inland Mission lost their lives at this time. This book commemorates those who lost their lives and tells the story of those who managed to escape. My thanks to Redcliffe College for providing me with a copy of the book to scan. This title is in the Public Domain. Due to the number of pictures and two excellent maps the download size of this file is larger than usual as I wanted to keep the image quality as high as possible.

Marshall Broomhall [1866-1937], Martyred Missionaries of the China Inland Mission with a Record of the Perils & Sufferings of Some Who Escaped. London: China Inland Mission, [1901]. Hbk. pp.329. [Click to download complete book in PDF]

Contents

  • Preface
  • Introductory: The