Short Introduction to Christian Missions by Eugene Stock

Eugene Stock [1836-1928], A Short Handbook of Missions

Eugene Stock, who also wrote the massive 4-volume History of the Church Missionary Society, provides a brief – but nonetheless comprehensive – introduction to Christian missions. My thanks to the Cambridge Centre of Christianity Worldwide for providing a copy of this public domain title for digitisation.

Eugene Stock [1836-1928], A Short Handbook of Missions. London: Longmans, Green, and Co., 1904. Hbk. pp.214. [Click to visit the download page for this title]

Contents

  • Prefatory Note
  1. What is a Mission?
  2. The Purpose of Missions
  3. The Motive of Missions
  4. The Need of Missions
  5. The Methods of Missions
  6. The Mission Agencies
  7. The Missionaries
  8. The Administration of Missions
  9. The Support of Missions
  10. Missions and Governments
  11. The World’s Population: Races, Languages, Religions
  12. Non-Christian Religions and Christianity
  13. Objections and Criticisms
  14. Seventeen Centuries of the Christian Era
  15. The Eighteenth Century
  16. The Nineteenth Century—1801–1840
  17. The Nineteenth Century—1841–1872
  18. The Nineteenth Century—1872–1900
  19. General Progress since 1872
  20. Results of Protestant Missions
  21. Testimonies
  22. Some Notable Missionaries
  23. Some Prominent Native Christians
  24. Some Auxiliary Helpers of Missions
  25. Missions of the Greek and Roman Churches
  26. Mission to the Jews
  27. Fields to be Worked
  28. Obstacles to be Encountered
  29. Opportunities and Resources
  30. “In This Generation”?
  31. Edification of Converts
  32. Building the Visible Church
  33. Aid for the Daughter Churches
  34. “I Believe in the Holy Ghost”

Appendix

  1. Some Books for Study
  2. Chronological Table

Prefatory Note

The last few years have seen a great change in the attitude of the Christian public towards what are called Foreign Missions. There was in the past a great deal of earnest sympathy with them, and liberal support of them, although in comparatively limited circles; but the principles and methods, the history and environment, of Missions, were not systematically studied. It is in this respect that the change is apparent. Old missionaries on their forty or fifth or sixth furloughs say that, as they go about the country to preach and speak in behalf of the cause, they find an intelligent knowledge and appreciation of the work which is new. It is partly a cause and partly a result of this increase of knowledge that missionary books of all kinds are multiplying, and find a ready sale.

But still, for the direction of the study now becoming less uncommon, some more definite guidance seems to be called for…

Page v.

History of Protestant Missions in India from 1706 to 1881

Matthew Atmore Sherring [1826-1880] & Edward Storrow [1818-1907], The History of Protestant Missions in India from their Commencement in 1706 to 1881This would appear to be a very significant work for those interested in early missionary work in India. It covers all of the major mission agencies involved from 1706 to 1881 and summaries the progress that had been made by the end of that period.

My thanks the Cambridge Centre for Christianity Worldwide for providing a copy of this book for digitisation. The title is in the public domain.

Matthew Atmore Sherring [1826-1880] & Edward Storrow [1818-1907], The History of Protestant Missions in India from their Commencement in 1706 to 1881. London: Religious Tract Society, 1884. Hbk. pp.463. [Click to visit the download page]

Contents

  • Preface
  1. Protestant Missions in India During the Eighteenth Century
  2. Missions in Calcutta and its Vicinity
  3. Missions in Bengal, Excluding Calcutta and its Vicinity
  4. Missions Among the Kols and Santals
  5. Missions in the North0-Western Provinces, Oudh, and Rohilkhand
  6. Missions in the Punjab
  7. Missions in Central India, including Rajpootana, Holkar’s Country,the Central Provinces, the BErars, and the Nizam’s Dominions
  8. Missions in the City and Presidency of Bambay
  9. Missions of Basle Evangelical Society in the Southern Marathi Country, Canara, and Malabar
  10. Missions in Bellary and the Mysore
  11. Missions of the Church Missionary Society in North Travancore and Cochin
  12. Missions of the London Missionary Society in South Travancore
  13. Missions of the Church Missionary Society, and of the Society for the Propagation of the Gospel in Foreign Parts, in the Province of Tinnevelly
  14. Missions in the Province of Madura, of the American Board of Commisioners for Foreign Missions, and of the Society for the Propagation in Foreign Parts
  15. Missions in Tanjore, Trichinopoly, Coimbatore, and the Neelgiris
  16. Missions in the Provinces of Arcot and Salem
  17. Missions in the City of Madras an its Vicinity, including the Province of Chingleput
  18. Missions in the Provinces of Cuddapah, Kurnool, and Nellore
  19. Missions in the Kistna abd Godavery Districts, and in Vizagapatam and Ganjam
  20. Summary of the Agencies and Results of Protestant Missions in India
  • Appendix A
  • Appendix B
  • Index

Preface

The aim of this work is to show historically what Protestant Missions have accomplished in India since their commencement in the beginning of the last century. In pursuance of this object, I have collected together all the important events of these Missions, and have presented them in a succinct and consecutive narrative, thus striving to give a complete view, as in a panorama, of their operations and achievements. Notwithstanding the numerous reports which have been £or many years issued by missionaries concerning their respective fields of labour, it has hitherto been well-nigh impossible to gain an adequate and distinct conception of the wonderful work which has been accomplished in the evangelization of the people of India. While leaving matters of unnecessary detail, I have endeavoured to furnish an outline of the various methods, plans, and projects which have been pursued in the formation and growth of the Indian Protestant Church, sufficiently minute to be correct, and yet so compacted together and interwoven as to suffer neither in unity nor comprehensiveness….