London Society For Promoting Christianity Amongst the Jewish People

W.T. Gidney (1852/3-1909), The History of the London Society For Promoting Christianity Amongst the Jews, From 1809 to 1908The evangelisation of the Jewish people continues to be a controversial area of Christian missions. The London Society For Promoting Christianity Amongst the Jews was founded by evangelical Christians in the early nineteenth Century. The Rev. W.T. Gidney’s History covers first hundred years of the operation.

Wikipedia notes that:

In response to changing attitudes towards outreach and the Jewish people, the society has changed its name several times over the years, first to Church Missions to Jews, then The Church’s Mission to the Jews, followed by The Church’s Ministry Among the Jews, and finally to the current name of The Church’s Ministry Among Jewish People, which was adopted in 1995.

A copy of this public domain title was kindly provided for digitisation by the Cambridge Centre for Christianity Worldwide.

W.T. Gidney (1852/3-1909), The History of the London Society For Promoting Christianity Amongst the Jews, From 1809 to 1908. London: London Society For Promoting Christianity Amongst the Jews, 1908. Hbk. pp.672. [Click to visit the download page]

Chapter 1. Introductory

Before entering upon the History of the London Society for Promoting Christianity amongst the Jews, it seems necessary, by way of introduction, to give, first, a brief account of efforts to evangelize them prior to its foundation, and, secondly, a short epitome of their history in our own country.

We shall see in this chapter that, whilst there have been some attempts to bring this ancient people of God to a knowledge of His Son, Jesus Christ, they have been, for the most part, spasmodic and unorganized, without any very intelligent or sustained aim. Not that the Jews have ever been altogether neglected, nor that there has ever been a time when the “remnant according to the election of grace” was non-existent.

We pass over, in the fewest words, the age of Christ and His Apostles. His and their work for their brethren according to the flesh stands out in clear relief in the Gospels and the Acts of the Apostles….

Snapshot of China and Chinese Missions from 1907

Marshall Broomhall [1866-1937], The Chinese Empire. A General and Missionary Survey.This is an extremely detailed province-by-province survey of Chinese life and the progress of Christian missions there up to 1907. It is written by multiple authors who each had personal experience of the region they wrote about.

This title is in the public domain. My thanks to Redcliffe College for making a copy available for digitisation.

Marshall Broomhall [1866-1937], The Chinese Empire. A General and Missionary Survey. London: Morgan & Scott, [1907]. Hbk. pp.472. [Click to visit the download page]

Contents

  • Preface by The Rt. Hon. Sir Ernest Satow, G.C.M.G
  • Editor’s Preface
  • Introduction by Marshall Broomhall. Geography; Early Nestorian Missions; First Roman Catholic Effort; Second Roman Catholic Effort. Protestant Missions: Period of Preparation, 1807-1842; Period of the Ports, 1842-1860; Period of Penetration, 1860-1877; Period of Progress, Persecution, and Prosperity, 1878-1907.
  • The Province of Kwagtung by The Rev. J. Campbell Gibson, M.A., D.D. English Presbyterian Mission. Arrived In China 1874.
  • The Province of Fukien by The Rev. Llewellyn Lloyd, Church Missionary Society. Arrived In China 1876.
  • The Island of Formosa by The Rev. Thomas Barclay, M.A., English Presbyterian. Mission. Arrived In China 1874.
  • The Province of Chekiang by the Ven. Archdeacon A. E. Moule, B.D., Church Missionary Society. Arrived In China 1861.
  • The Province of Kiangsu by Rev. John Darroch, Translator For Shansi Imperial University. Arrived In China 1887.
  • The Province of Shantung by Mr. C. F. Hogg. Arrived In China 1884.
  • The Province of Chihli by The Rev. Thomas Bryson, London Missionary Society. Arrived In China 1866.
  • The Province of Hupeh by The Rev. Arnold Foster, B.A., London Missionary Society. Arrived In China 1871.
  • The Province of Kiangsi By Mr. Archibald Orr-Ewing, China Inland Mission. Arrived In China 1886.
  • The Province of Anhwei by The Rev. J. J. Coulthard, China Inland Mission. Arrived In China 1879.
  • The Province of Honan by G. Whitfield Guinness, B.A., M.B., China Inland Mission. Arrived In China 1897.
  • The Province of Hunan By Mr. A. H. Harris, Late Acting Commissioner of Customs, Changsha. Arrived In China 1883.
  • The Province of Kansu by Marshall Broomhall, In China 1890-1899.
  • The Province of Shensi by Marshall Broomhall, In China 1890-1899.
  • The Province of Shansi by Mr. Albert Lutley, China Inland Mission, Arrived In China 1887,
  • The Province of Szechwan by Mr. Jushu-A Vale, China Inland Mission. Arrived In China. 1887.
  • The Province of Yunnan by The Rev. John M’carthy, China Inland Mission. Arrived In China 1867.
  • The Province of Kweichow by The Rev. Samuel Clarke, China Inland Mission. Arrived In China 1878.
  • The Province of Kwangsi by The Rev. Louis Byrde, B.A., Church Missionary Society. Arrived In China 1898.
  • The Province of Sinkiang by Mr. George Hunter, China Inland Mission. Arrived In China 1889.
  • Manchuria by The Rev. J. W. Inglis, M.A., United Free Church of Scotland. Arrived In Manchuria in 1890.
  • Tibet by Mr. Cecil Polhill, China Inland Mission. Arrived In China 1885.
  • Mongolia by Marshall Broomhall. And Supplementary Section on Work For the Mongols At Kalgan, By Rev. J. H. Roberts, American Board of C.F.M. Arrived In China 1877.
  • The Bible in the Chinese Empire by Marshall Broomhall; Based on Material Supplied by the British and Foreign Bible Society.
  • Appendices
    I. Philology
    II. The Jews in China
    Ill. Introduction of Christianity Into China
    IV. Biographical Outlines
  • Indices
    I. Chronological
    II. General
    III. Missionary Societies
  • IV. Biographical or Personal
    V. Topographical

Mary Reed, Missionary to the Lepers

Mary ReedMary Reed [1854-1943] was an American missionary to India. Diagnosed with leprosy herself in 1891, she took this to be God’s guidance that she should work among the lepers of Chandag where she served for 52 years. Below are links to two titles on Mary Reed, both written within her lifetime. The first I am assuming to be still in copyright to The Leprosy Mission who are happy for my to make it available on-line. It may be used for free educational purposes, but not sold for profit without permission from the copyright holder. The second title is in the public domain. My thanks to Redcliffe College for providing copies of these books for digitisation.

E. Mackerchar, Mary Reed of Chandag, 5th edn. London: The Mission to Lepers, n.d. Pbk. pp.32. [Click to visit the download page]

John Jackson [1853-1917], Mary Reed: Missionary to the Lepers, 9th revd. & enlarged edn., 1908. London: Marshall Brothers, 1899. Hbk. pp.133. [Click to visit the download page]

Contents

  • Extract from Miss Reed’s Letter
  • Preface to the New and Enlarged Edition (the Ninth)
  • Introductory Words by Rev. F.B. Meyer
  1. Early Life
  2. Discovery and Decision
  3. The Way of the Cross
  4. Appointed to Chandag
  5. Among the Lepers
  6. Trials and Triumphs – 1894
  7. Praise and Progress – 1895
  8. A Welcome Visitor – 1895
  9. Travail of Soul – 1896
  10. Year by Year
  11. Christmas With the Lepers
  12. A Vision of the Night
  13. Divided Duties – 1897
  14. Light and Shade – 1898
  15. The Prayer of Faith – 1899

Appendix – Bringing the Narrative up to August, 1908.

Short History of the Church Missionary Society

Eugene Stock [1836-1928], One Hundred Years. Being the Short History of the Church Missionary SocietyIf you are looking for a history of the first century of the Church Missionary Society but don’t have time to read Eugene Stock’s massive four volume work, this slim volume will be of help to you. My thanks to Redcliffe College for making this book available for digitisation. This title is in the public domain.

Eugene Stock [1836-1928], One Hundred Years. Being the Short History of the Church Missionary Society. London: Church Missionary Society, 1899. Hbk. pp.188. [Click to visit the downlaod page]

Contents

  • Preface
  1. One Hundred Years Ago
  2. Ninety Years Ago (1800-1809)
  3. Eighty Years Ago (1809-1819)
  4. Seventy Years Ago (1819-1829)
  5. Sixty Years Ago (1829-1839)
  6. Fifty Years Ago (1839-1849)
  7. Forty Years Ago (1849-1859)
  8. Thirty Years Ago (1859-1869)
  9. Twenty Years Ago (1869-1879)
  10. Ten Years Ago (1879-1889)
  11. The Last Ten Years (1889-1898)
  12. The Last Ten Years (Continued)
  13. Conclusion
  • Chronological Table
  • Index of Persons and Places

Preface

This little book has been written for publication in advance of the complete· History of the Church Missionary Society. The greater part of it consists of a very brief summary of some of the facts given in the larger work; and here and there sentences and paragraphs are actually reproduced from the still unpublished volumes. But part of Chapter IX., and Chapters X. and XI., have had to be written before the corresponding portions of the complete History. To many of the most · important parts of the complete History, however, there is nothing corresponding in these pages. For the History dwells at some length upon the environment of the Society at different periods in the century, that is to say, upon the state of the Church of England at home, noticing various religious movements, developments, and controversies, and introducing such men as Bishops Blomfield and Wilberforce, Archbishops Tait and Benson, Lords Shaftesbury and Cairns, Sir Arthur Blackwood and Mr. Pennefather, Bishop Ryle and Canon Hoare….

Mending and Making: The Work of the Leprosy Mission

W.H.P. & M. Anderson, Mending and MakingThis profusely illustrated little book sets out to explain the work of the Mission to Lepers, now The Leprosy Mission. This work is reproduced by permission of the The Leprosy Mission. This book may be used for free educational purposes, but not reprinted for profit without permission from the copyright holder.

W.H.P. & M. Anderson, Mending and Making. London: The Mission to Lepers, n.d. Pbk. pp.63. [Click to visit the download page]

Contents

  • Foreword
  • Reading to Perish
  • A “City” of Compassion
  • Settling their own affairs
  • Must I Become like These?
  • When Mercy Smiles
  • Out of their Poverty
  • The Doctor Babu and his Patients
  • Giving them a Chance
  • The Gift of “Perfect Soundness”

Foreword

It is startling to many people to learn that there are great numbers of lepers in the world. There are more lepers probably in Asia than any other continent, but Africa and South America are sorely affected. Leprosy is also prevalent in the numerous islands of the Pacific Ocean, and few, if any, countries of the world are quite free of it. The disease finds most favourable conditions for spreading among people of low standards of living, because of their poverty and their ignorance of even the simplest laws of health.

Vigorous measures against leprosy have been possible in the Hawaiian and Philip-pine Islands, and if no new cases should be imported the prospect of those islands becoming free of leprosy is hopeful. No country, however, especially in these days of freedom of movement of people from one land to another, is free from the menace of the disease, particularly those countries most easy of access from the seriously infected parts of Asia. In lands like our own, where higher standards of living obtain, with strictly enforced health laws, the danger of leprosy gaining a foothold is negligible….

A Mission Hospital at the Foot of Fish-Tail Mountain in Nepal

Lily M. O'Hanlon, At the Foot of Fish-Tail MountainThis little book is considered by the staff of the International Nepal Fellowship to be the most significant publication in the mission’s history. Following the opening of Nepal’s borders to ex-patriate missionaries in 1952, it tells of the story of founding of the mission work at the Shining Hospital in Pokhara.

At the Foot of Fish-Tail Mountain is in copyright and is reproduced here by kind permission of the International Nepal Fellowship (formerly the Nepal Evangelistic Band). The copyright holder has licenced its distribution for free educational purposes, but it must not be resold for profit.

Lily M. O’Hanlon, At the Foot of Fish-Tail Mountain. Perth: Milne, Tannahill & Methven, Ltd., [1957]. Hbk. pp.61. [Click to visit the download page]

Contents

  • Preface
  • Foreword
  1. Entering Nepal
  2. Inheriting the Promise
  3. Proving His Faithfulness
  4. Fulfilling the Commission
  5. Healing the Leper
  6. Building His Church

Foreword

This is a most disturbing book: it is an account of a modern miracle. It is far more than a record of a great missionary adventure. It is convicting and challenging. It has made me thoroughly ashamed of myself, and my so much more easy pilgrimage.

Dr. Lily O’Hanlon, and her colleague, Hilda Steele, set off at the call of God to be ready to enter the closed land of Nepal, directly the “gate” was open and the needed permissions granted.

Nothing daunted by the difficulties, disappointments, and delays, they waited and worked among the border villages for sixteen years, always fully persuaded that what God had promised them He was able to perform.

And now He has done it. The redeeming love of Christ is known to some in that hitherto unopened territory of God’s world. His two intrepid ambassadors had none of the comforts of modern travel in reaching their promised land. They walked, they climbed, they trekked, often without knowing where they would rest the following night. But they arrived! …

Biography of Isabella Lilias Trotter, founder of the Algiers Mission Band

Lilias Trotter at 27

This is one of the standard biographies of Isabella Lilias Trotter (1853-1928), who was recently featured as part of the SOAS Archives and Special Collections Women’s History Month. The SOAS now holds the archive of the Algiers Mission Team and Lilias Trotter’s works. My thanks to Redcliffe College for providing a copy of the book for digitisation. This title is in the public domain.

Blanche Anne Frances Pigott [1849-1930], I. Lilias Trotter, Founder of the Algiers Mission Band. London: Marshall, Morgan & Scott, [1930]. Hbk. pp.245. [Click to visit the download page]

Contents

  • Foreword
  1. Early Years
  2. Coniston, 1879
  3. Algiers, 1888-1890
  4. Second Journey to Africa, 1890
  5. Rue du Croissant, 1893 and 1894
  6. Itinerating, 1895
  7. 1896-1899
  8. Tolga, 1900-1901
  9. Tract-Writing and Translating, 1902-1904
  10. Da Naama, El-Biar, 1905 and 1906
  11. Blida and Bousaada, 1907
  12. Translating – Sweden, 1908, 1909, and 1910.
  13. Opening Slum Post, Shushan Palace, and Egypt, 1911, 1912, and 1913
  14. South Lands and the Great War, 1914-1916
  15. South Lands, 1917
  16. The Home Call of Blanche Haworth, 1918 and 1919
  17. Itinerating in Tunisia, 1920-1922
  18. Among the Mystics of the South, 1923
  19. The Conference on the Mount of Olives,1924
  20. The Close of Rue du Croisaant – Opening of Bousada – The Nile Mission Press at Dar Naama, 1925
  21. Narrowing of the Pathway, 1926
  22. Home, 1927 and 1928

More material on this missionary is available on the Isabella Lilias Trotter page.

Chapter 1: Early Years

Lilias was the seventh in the family of nine, her father having four sons and two daughters by his first wife Jaqueline, daughter of Bishop Otter.

Coutts, the eldest, took Orders and became Senior Fellow, and, later, Vice-Master of Trinity College, Cambridge. William, like his father, became a partner of Capel & Co. Henry, afterwards Lt.-Colonel Sir Henry Trotter, K.C.M.G., C.B., R.E., went out to India in I 860 in the Royal Engineers, and, after a varied and distinguished career, became Consul-General at Beyrout for Palestine and Syria. Later he was on the Danube Commission with a house at Galatz, in Roumania, where he lived with his wife and daughters until he retired. Edward started early in life as Vicar of Alnwick and Chaplain to the Duke of Northumberland. Later he devoted himself to work in the Colonies. He belonged to the pioneer type of Churchman, preferring the outposts of civilization to a settled parish….

Story of the Mission to Lepers 1874-1917 by A. Donald Miller

A. Donald Miller, An Inn Called Welcome. The Story of the Mission to Lepers 1874-1917“This book tells the story of forty-three years of compassionate service to leprosy sufferers. It begins in a drawing room in a Dublin suburb, and ends in places as far apart as India, China and Korea. Although the book covers only the years 1874-1917, it is published during the ninetieth anniversary year of The Mission to Lepers and, at a later date, it is hoped to continue the story from the end of the First World War to the middle of the twentieth century.”

“Mr. A. Donald Miller’s service to those who suffer from leprosy began in 1922 when he was posted by The Mission to Lepers to its largest Home, at Purulia, in West Bengal, India. In 1924 he became the Mission’s Secretary for India, organising and developing the work in that country where the Mission began its activities and where it still has its largest Field. From 1943 until 1960 he was General Secretary of The Mission to Lepers and, on his retirement, became Consultant from 1960 to 1963 when he was made a Vice-President of the Society. His work has taken him to many countries where the Mission and its co-operating societies work in the field of leprosy care and control. He is eminently fitted, by experience and ability, to write the story of the Mission. His other books include A Bridge of Compassion and Music at Midnight.”

From the dustjacket

This book is in copyright and is reproduced here by kind permission of The Leprosy Mission. You are permitted to download and print this book for free educational purposes. It may not be sold for profit without written permission from the copyright holder.

A. Donald Miller, An Inn Called Welcome. The Story of the Mission to Lepers 1874-1917. London: The Mission to Lepers, 1965. Hbk. pp.241. [Click to visit the download page]

Contents

  • Introduction
  • Part One: 1874-1899
  • Part Two: 1900-1909
  • Part Three: 1910-1917
  • Index

First 100 Years of Protestant Missions in Japan

Dorothy Pape, Captives of the Mighty. Christ and the Japanese Enigma

Protestant Christianity did not reach Japan until 1859, and during these 100 years the progress of the church has been comparatively slow. These are even now only about a quarter of a million converts in a population of over 90 million. This book seeks to explain many of the peculiar difficulties created by a unique and mystifying culture, which face the missionary and Japanese Christian there. It is written out of a burning desire to further the cause of Christ in a nation which is of the greatest strategic importance in the Far East and which aspires to be the bridge between nations of the East and the West.

To divide this book into two parts is logical. One part deals with the general culture and religious background of Japan, while the second tells the story of the outworking of the Christian faith in the lives of the Japanese. All readers will not necessarily want to commence with the first half; some readers may prefer to read the second half first.

From the dust jacket.

This title is copyright OMF International UK and is reproduced here by permission. You can download this book for free educational purposes. It must not be reublished for profir without explicit written permission from the copyright holder. My thanks to Book Aid for providing a copy of this book for digitisation.

Dorothy Pape, Captives of the Mighty. Christ and the Japanese Enigma. London: China Inland Mission, 1959. Hbk. pp.303. [Click to visit the download page]

Contents

Preface

Part I: The Enviroment – Cultural Background

1. A People Unveiled
2. The Imprisoning Web
3. The Spirit of Japan (1) Its Origin
4. The Spirit of Japan (2) Its Modrn Guise
5. Other Gods of Shinto
6. Pale Moonlight of Buddhism
7. A Pseudo Salvation-ny-Faith
8. The Sense of Sin
9. The Fer of Death
10. The Japanese Language – The Art of Concealing Thought
11. A Blunted Sword
12. Black Lily of Resentment
13. Meeting of East and West

Part II. The Preaching of Release

14. With Long Patience
15. Tent Evangelism
16. The Northern Island
17. North Glory Church
18. Hidaka Coast
19. Samani – By-path Meadow
20. Aomori – The Gospel in the Capital
21. In Cities Old and New
22. In Quiet Country Towns
23. Thirst for Knowledge
24. Bruised Reeds
25. Hope For the Future

Glossary
Bibliography

Fires at the Foot of Fish-Tail by Patricia Hepworth

Machhapuchhare, view from Tadapani source Wikipedia
Machapuchhare, viewed from Tadapani. Source Wikipedia

The “fires” in the title of this book are Nepali Christian workers who sought to bring the gospel to their fellow countrymen and women. “Fish-Tail” is the magnificent Mount Machapuchare which dominates the sky-line of the city of Pokhara in Central Nepal. This little book tells the story of some of these fire brands. It was published by the Nepal Evangelistic Band in 1959 and reproduced here by kind permission of the International Nepal Fellowship. You are free to use this PDF for free educational purposes, but not to sell it for profit without written permission from the copyright holder.

Patricia Hepworth [d.1967], Fires at the Foot of Fish-TailPatricia Hepworth [d.1967], Fires at the Foot of Fish-Tail. Teignmouth: Nepal Evangelistic Band, [1959]. Pbk. pp.46. [Click to visit the download page]

Contents

  • Foreword
  1. “Fires” at the Foot of Fish-Tail
  2. Pastor David and Premi
  3. Philip and Paili
  4. Daud and Soni
  5. Buddhi Sagar and Putuli
  6. Noah nad Hannah
  7. Magdelene
  8. Simon
  9. Prem Masih
  10. Yacub and Rebecca
  11. Priscilla
  12. Priti
  13. Epilogue

Foreword

There are expositors who teach that the seven Letters to the Churches in Revelation 2 and 3 are descriptive of the seven epochs in history which must be completed before the Return of the Lord. Most of them have made comparisons which suggest that today we are in the final·epoch descriptive of the Laodicean Church. Yet surely the Philadelphian experience of the open and shut door is incredibly interpretative of our generation. The door is closed in China; it is almost closed in other territories where permission for continuing work begun many years ago is ungraciously given, and then chiefly for educational or medical reasons. It would seem that to-day doors that were once wide open are certainly closing. It is equally true that doors that have been fastened against the Christian Missionary for centuries are now beginning to open. Since there are no chance happenings in sovereign grace it must be in the Will of God that Nepal has opened its doors, and therefore the following contribution by one of the pioneer missionaries, one of the first to pass through the open door, is not only of interest, but of great value….