Thomas Hughes’s Biography of David Livingstone

Thomas Hughes [1822-1896], David LivingstoneDavid Livingstone (19 March 1813 – 1 May 1873) is regarded by some as the greatest British Missionary to Africa. This is Thomas Hughes biography of Livingstone written in 1889. My thanks to Redcliffe College for making a copy of the book available for scanning. This title is in the public domain.

Thomas Hughes [1822-1896], David Livingstone. London & New York: MacMillan & Co., 1889. Hbk. pp.208. [Click to download complete book in PDF]

Contents

  1. David Livingstone
  2. Start in Africa – Kuruman
  3. Kolobeng – Lake Ngai – The Zambesi
  4. Linyanti and the Makololo
  5. Across Africa – Loanda to Quilemane
  6. Home
  7. The Zambesi Expedition – To Linynti amd Back
  8. The Universities Mission
  9. Recall – Voyage to India
  10. Second Visit Home
  11. Lakes Moero, Bangweolo, and Tanganyika
  12. Stanley
  13. To Unyanyembe with Stanley
  14. Wating at Unyanyembe
  15. The Last Advance – Death
  16. Conclusion

Chapter 1

“My own inclination would lead me to say as little as possible about myself.” With these words the greatest explorer of modern times begins that account of his missionary journeys and researches in South Africa which electrified England. The eager desire of his countrymen to know all they could about himself, induced him to modify his own inclination so far as to devote six pages of his famous book to the history of his family, and of the early years of his own life up to the time of his sailing for the Cape at the age of twenty-three. This reticence is as characteristic of the man as are the few facts he does disclose. Foremost of these stands: “My great-grandfather fell at the battle of Culloaen, fighting for the old line of kings, and my grandfather was a small farmer in Ulva, where my father was born.” [Continue reading]

 

Dayspring in Uganda by Albert B. Lloyd

Albert B Lloyd [?-1946], Dayspring in UgandaAlbert Lloyd, the Archdeacon of Western Uganda, writes here about the work of the Church Missionary Society in that country. My thanks to Redcliffe College for providing me with a copy of this book. This book is in the public domain.

Albert B Lloyd [?-1946], Dayspring in Uganda. London: Church Missionary Society, 1921. Hbk. pp.120. [Click to download complete book in PDF]

Contents

  • Introduction
  1. The Land and the People
  2. The First Missionaries
  3. Laying the Foundations
  4. “Yet Shall He Live”
  5. The Building of the Church
  6. A Missionary Church
  7. The Lights Spreads
  8. The Gospel in Kavirondo
  9. Clouds in the Sky

Introduction

In the minds and affections of the home Church in modern days the place of Uganda has been unrivalled. It has been a name to conjure with. The early heroes and martyrs, whose names are now household words in English Christian circles; the action of the Church, good or otherwise, in saving Uganda for the Empire; the phenomenal progress of Christianity; and the testimony alike of travellers, statesmen, and traders, as to the real uplift of the people-all ·these have conspired to give Uganda a unique position. The country, however, has done more than attract attention to itself; it has stimulated interest in the missionary cause everywhere and put fresh vitality into men’s faith in Jesus Christ.

No reader must come to this book looking for a detailed history of the Mission, or he will be disappointed. There are only two incidental references to the two Roman Catholic missions in Uganda-the one French, and the English-whose converts in 1920 were said to number 230,000; we miss also any description of the constitution of the Church in Uganda, adopted in 1909, which provides for a synod, diocesan council, parochial and district councils, women’s conferences, tribunals of appeal and reference, and boards of education, missions, and theology. Again, no mention is made of Bishop Parker who succeeded Bishop Hannington and, like him but for a different cause, failed to reach Uganda, dying with others of his party at the south end of the lake. [Continue Reading]

Sons of Han – Stories of Chinese Life and Mission Work

Bernard William Upward [1873-1944], The Sons of Han. Stories of Chinese Life and Mission Work“Sons of Han” is a collection of stories about London Missionary Society mission work in China written for a youthful audience – and hence profusely illustrated. My thanks to Redcliffe College for providing a copy of this book to scan. This title is in the public domain.

Bernard William Upward [1873-1944], The Sons of Han. Stories of Chinese Life and Mission Work. London: Church Missionary Society, 1908. Hbk. pp.192. [Click to download complete book in PDF]

Contents

  1. Making Believe
  2. How the Gospel Came to Hankow
  3. Learning New Lessons
  4. “In Journeys Oft”
  5. From Village to Village
  6. Boys and Girls
  7. Playtime
  8. Festivals and Holidays
  9. A Day of Rejoicing
  10. Doctors and Their Patients
  11. Another Hospital, and a Visit to the Lepers
  12. The Revival of Learning

Preface

A book for young people, with plenty of pictures and stories, was asked for; and these pages of missionary commonplaces are the result.

The idea throughout has been to give an account of some of the phases of Chinese life and of mission work among this great people. With a field so wide in which to range the difficulty is altogether one of selection. Child-life is so fascinating a subject that these pages might easily have been filled with stories of children and their ways. Folk-· lore is an inviting study, and material for it abounds, yielding many a weird story. To describe fully the different branches of our mission work in Central China would, perhaps, not have been the best way to introduce the young folk, for which this little book is intended, to the study of a great people of whom the missionary can truly say that the more he knows them, the more he finds in them to love. [Continue reading]

Stories of a Slave-Boy Illustrating the Universities’ Mission to Central Africa

Robert Keable [1887-1927], The Adventures of Paul Kangai. Stories of a Slave-Boy, Illustrating the Universities' Mission to Central AfricaThe Adventures of Paul Kangai is a fictionalised account of African life written to provide an insight into the work of the Universities’ Mission to Central Africa. My thanks to Redcliffe College for providing a copy of this book for digitisation. This book is in the public domain.

Robert Keable [1887-1927], The Adventures of Paul Kangai. Stories of a Slave-Boy, Illustrating the Universities’ Mission to Central Africa. London: Universities Mission to Central Africa, 1918. Hbk. pp.145. [Click to download complete book in PDF]

Contents

  1. How Kangai Lost his Father
  2. How Kangai Stalked a Snake and Fond a Stick Beside it
  3. How Kangai Learned Many Things and Set Out For the Blue Water
  4. How Kangai Ate Ship’s Biscuits and Met my Lord Bishop
  5. How Kangai Changed His Name and the Bell Awoke Msamya
  6. How Paul Got Back His Silver Box
  7. How Paul Met Old Enemies and an Old Friend
  8. How Paul Heard “Maadui” Cried Again and Marched Behind the Drums

Chapter 1: How Kangai Lost His Father

On a big river one broiling hot day in Central Africa an unusual quiet had fallen. Five minutes before, a big band of men, armed with spears and shields and bows and arrows, had come down through the trees on the bank, had sprung out on to the big flat stones where the water lapped and gurgled as it rushed by, had beaten the pools with their spears to scare the crocodiles, and had then crossed all together. [Continue reading]

Battling and Building Among the Bhils

Bhils or Bheel are primarily an Adivasi people of North West India. Bhils are also settled in the Tharparkar District of Sindh, Pakistan. They speak the Bhil languages, a subgroup of the Western Zone of the Indo-Aryan languages. According to Census, 2001, Bhils were the largest tribal group in India followed by Gond tribe. [Wikipedia]

A.I. Birkett [1863-1916], Battling and Building Among the BhilsThis little book tells the story of the Church Missionary Society mission to the Bhils. My thanks to Redcliffe College for providing me with a copy of this book to scan. This title is now in the public domain.

A.I. Birkett [1863-1916], Battling and Building Among the Bhils. London: Church Missionary Society, 1914. Hbk. pp.95. [Click to download complete book in PDF]

Contents

  1. Bhil Characteristics and Customs
  2. Pioneering
  3. The Dawn of Light
  4. Advance
  5. Times of Blessing
  6. Kerwera and Education
  7. Biladia
  8. Kotra
  9. Medical Work
  10. Church Organisation
  11. Women’s Work in Camp and Station
  • Appendices

Preface

This little history has been written by a lady who asks that it “may be published without her name being given, as the information it contains is culled from many sources, and many others have given helpful criticisms and contributions.” On behalf of those who have helped her I would express our gratitude for the labour which has shaped the mass of materials into the present interesting history. I have myself as far as possible compared every statement with the original sources and believe it is absolutely trustworthy.

It is sent out now for the information of many who have asked for a book on the Bhil Mission, with the prayer that God will so use it that all who read it may be helped to more earnest and persevering prayer that the little Bhil Church may be sanctified and built up in the Lord and’ become a channel of life and blessing to its own land. [Continue Reading]

Baptist Mission to the Congo

John Brown Myers [1844/45-1915], Congo For Christ. The Story of the Congo MissionJohn Myers brings up to date the story of the work of the Baptist Mission to the Congo, building on the account of Joseph Tritton using official BMS records. My thanks to Redcliffe College for providing me with a copy of this book to scan. This title is in the public domain.

John Brown Myers [1844/45-1915], Congo For Christ. The Story of the Congo Mission, new edn. London: S.W. Partridge & Co., [1905]. Hbk. pp.190. [Click to download complete book in PDF]

Contents

  • Preface
  • Preface to the Third Edition
  1. The Country, People, Language and Climate
  2. How the Congo Mission Began
  3. Early Difficulties Overcome
  4. Ingathering of the First-Fruits
  5. The Work Amongst the Congo Boys and Girls
  6. Literary Labours
  7. The Services of the Mission to Civilisation and Philanthropy
  8. The Native Christian Churches
  9. The Native Christian Churches (Continued)
  10. The Evangelistic Efforts of the Native Christian Churches
  11. The Death Roll and How to Regards it
  12. The Future of the Congo Mission
  13. Other Missions in the Congo
  14. Changes and Progress in the Lower Congo
  15. Developments on the Upper Congo River

Preface

Numerous inquiries have been made for’ a concise history of the Congo Mission, brought up to date: With the view of meeting this demand the present volume has been written. The late esteemed Treasurer of the Baptist Missionary Society, Mr. Joseph Tritton, published “The Rise and Progress of the Congo Mission” in 1885, which. publication has for some time been out of print, and during the last ten years the Missions has greatly developed. Considerable information is also to be found in the Memoir of Thomas J. Camber; appearing in this. Series, but that work· is necessarily restricted by its biographical character. [Continue reading]

China Inland Mission School at Chefoo

Stanley Houghton, Edith B. Harman & Margaret Pyle, Chefoo.

“The Chefoo School (traditional Chinese: 芝罘學校; simplified Chinese: 芝罘学校; pinyin: Zhīfú Xuéxiào; Wade–Giles: Chih-fu Hsüeh-hsiao), also known as Protestant Collegiate School or China Inland Mission School, was a Christian boarding school established by the China Inland Mission—under James Hudson Taylor—at Chefoo (Yantai), in Shandong province in northern China, in 1880. Its purpose was to provide an education for the children of foreign missionaries and the foreign business and diplomatic communities in China.” – Wikipedia

This book tells the story of the Chefoo school from the time of its foundation to the 1920s. My thanks to OMF International-UK for their kind permission to place the book on-line and to Redcliffe College for providing me with a copy to scan. This book is copyright OMF International-UK.

Stanley Houghton, Edith B. Harman & Margaret Pyle, Chefoo. London: The China Inland Mission, 1931. Pbk. pp.82. [Click to download complete book in PDF]

Contents

  • Foreword
  • Editor’s Note

Part I – Today by Stanley Houghton, B.A.

  • Foundation Day
  • The School
  • The Memoerial Hall
  • Behind the Scenes
  • Some Difficulties

Part II – Yesterday by Edith B. Harman

  • 1881
  • 1888
  • 1895
  • 18900
  • 1908
  • 1910-1911
  • 1911-1912
  • 1914-1918

Part III – Its Tomorrow’s by Margaret Pyle

  • Its Tomorrows

APPENDIX

  • What I Owe to Chefoo

Foreword

“Little is much if God is in it.” Who, fifty years ago, looking at that class of three boys, gathered in a small room in the doctor’s house, could have foretold what great proportions would be attained from such a small beginning? But “with God all things are possible”, and to-day, in this our Jubilee Year, we thank God for His grace given to Mr. Hudson Taylor and Mr. Elliston that they did not “despise the day of small things”, for to them and to each member of the China Inland Mission, in the succeeding years, has been given the joy of watching the expansion of the work. They have not needed to wait for the time of rejoicing until maturity had been reached. [Continue reading]

In Memory of Hudson Taylor

Marshall Broomhall [1866-1937], ed., In Memoriam: Rev. J. Hudson Taylor M.R.C.S. Beloved Founder and Director of the China Inland MissionThis book is a collection of addresses made at Hudson Taylor’s Memorial service at the Conference Hall in Mildmay, London in 1905. He was a man who touched thousands of lives for Christ, and this is reflected in the reminiscences of those who knew him well.

My thanks to OMF International-UK for their kind permission to places this book on-line and to Redcliffe College for providing a copy for digitisation. This book is copyright OMF International-UK.

Marshall Broomhall [1866-1937], ed., In Memoriam: Rev. J. Hudson Taylor M.R.C.S. Beloved Founder and Director of the China Inland Mission. London: China Inland Mission, 1905. Hbk. pp.104. [Click to download complete book in PDF]

Contents

  • In Memoriam – Poem. By Dr. A.T. Pierson
  • Reminiscences. By B. Broomhall
  • Memorial Service: Programme
  • Memorial Service: Representatives
  • Address. By Theodore Howard, Esq.
  • Address. By J.E. Mathieson, Esq.
  • Address. By Eugene Stock, Esq.
  • Address. By Rev. John Sharp
  • Address. By Rev. R. Wardlaw Thompson
  • Address. By Dr. Harry Guiness
  • Address. By W.B. Sloan, Esq.
  • Tribute. By Dr. Arthur T. Pierson
  • Letters: Personal and Official
  • Press Notices

Preface

To many thousands of persons the news of Mr. Hudson Taylor’s Home-call has come as a personal sorrow. As a leader and teacher, one of the most prominent features in his life has been the power to create a  bond of esteem and affection between himself and others. His loyalty to God and to His cause, together with the largeness of his sympathies, have gained for him a large circle of friends among the choicest of God’s people all over the world.

In the belief that to many of these a  small “In Memoriam” volume would be welcome, this little book has been compiled. [Continue reading]

Dawn on the Kachin Hills

C.H. Denyer, Dawn on the Kachin HillsDawn on the Kachin Hills serves both as a helpful introduction to Christian Missions in general and to the work of Bible Churchmen’s Missionary Society there. It also includes material on the work among the Naga peoples of what is now the most easterly parts of India.

My thanks to Crosslinks for their permission to place the book on-line and to Redcliffe College for providing a copy to scan. This book is copyright Crosslinks.

C.H. Denyer, Dawn on the Kachin Hills. A Brief Account of Burma and Its Peoples, and of Missionary Work among them, with Special Reference to the Races of Upper Burma and the New Mission of the Bible Churchmen’s Missionary Society. London: Bible Churchmen’s Missionary Society, 1927. Pbk. pp.112. [Click to download complete book in PDF]

Contents

  • Preface by Sir Harry Stileman
  • Foreword by the Author
  1. Burma in General. Some Geography and a Little History
  2. Rangoon, Lower Burma and the Burmans
  3. How the Gospel came to Burma
  4. The Kachin Hills and the Government
  5. The Kachins, Their Origins and Customs
  6. More about the Shans
  7. The New B.C.M.S. Work in Upper Burma
  8. The Daily Routine of a New Missionary
  • One Word More

Appendices

  1. Other Books to Read
  2. Hints for Study Circles on Burma

God’s Deliverance from the Boxer Uprising

Alexander R. Saunders, A God of Deliverances. The Story of the Marvellous Deliverances Through the Sovereign Power of God of a Party of Missionaries, When Compelled by the Boxer Rising to Flee From Shan-Si, North ChinaThe Boxer Uprising (a.k.a. the Yihequan Movement) of 1899-1901 was  one to the darkest  hours for missionaries in China. This little book recounts how some of the China Inland Mission workers were able to escape the hands of the Boxers. My thanks to OMF International-UK for their kind permission to place this book on-line and to Redcliffe College for providing a copy to scan. This title is copyright OMF International-UK.

Alexander R. Saunders, A God of Deliverances. The Story of the Marvellous Deliverances Through the Sovereign Power of God of a Party of Missionaries, When Compelled by the Boxer Rising to Flee From Shan-Si, North China. London: China Inland Mission, [1901]. Hbk. pp.88. [Click to download complete book in PDF]

Contents

  • Preface by Rev J. Hudson Taylor, M.R.C.S., F.R.G.S.
  1. Before the Riot
  2. The Flight to the Yamen
  3. Within a Step of Death
  4. Our Second Riot
  5. A Spectacle to Men and to Angels
  6. Prisoners of the Lord
  7. Two Martyrs
  8. Wonders at the Yellow River
  9. Sorrow Upon Sorrow
  10. Safe Home at Last

Chapter 1 0 – Before the riot

”Beloved, think it not strange concerning the fiery trial which is to try you.”-1 Peter iv. 12.

The city of P’ing-yao was opened as a station by the China Inland Mission in 1888. Being the banking centre for China, its position is important, and it subsequently became the business centre for the C.I.M. in Central Shan-si. During the twelve years of missionary work in this station, 133 persons have been baptized. With these Christians organised under eight separate congregations, all paying their own expenses, and in two cases with chapels mort-gaged by native contributions, and with nearly 100 candidates waiting for baptism, the Lord’s work had never seemed more encouraging than just prior to the Boxer rising.

In consequence of information received concerning the Boxer troubles in Shan-tong, I was led, during the earlier part of the year, to speak much to the Christians on the subject of persecution and affliction for Christ’s sake, and one cannot but praise God for having been led so to do. [Continue reading]