Missionary Crusaders by Claud Field

Claud Field [1863-1941], Missionary Crusaders

A collection of 18 short biographies of missionaries from around the world, presumably intended to inspire children. These include John Eliot, David Brainerd, Robert Moffat, David Livingstone, Christian Schwartz and Adoniram Judson. My thanks to Book Aid for providing a copy of this public domain title for digitisation.

Claud Field [1863-1941], Missionary Crusaders. Stories of the Dauntless Courage and Remarkable Adventures Which Missionaries Have Had Whilst Carrying Out Their Duties in Many Parts of the World. London: Seeley, Service & Co. Ltd., 1930. Hbk. pp.221. [Click to visit the download page for this title]

Contents

  • Preface
  1. John Eliot, the Apostle to the Red Indians
  2. The Captive of the Iroquois
  3. David Brainerd Among the Redskins
  4. Hans Egede in Greenland
  5. Sixty Years Among the Red indians
  6. William Duncan at Metlahkatlah
  7. In the Highlands of Tibet
  8. Among West Indian Slaves
  9. In the Forest of Dutch Guiana
  10. The Champion of the Hottentots
  11. Robert Moffat and the Bechuanas
  12. From Slave to Bishop
  13. The Martyrs of Madagascar
  14. Livingstone’s Early Explorations
  15. Schwartz in South India
  16. At the Mercy of an Egyptian Pasha
  17. Dr. Judson in Burmah
  18. Dr. Wolff in Central Asia

1890 Deputation Visit to North China by Rev T.M. Morris

Cover: T.M. Morris [1830-1904], A Winter in North China with an Introduction by the Rev. Richard Glover of Bristol.

This is an account of a deputation tour of Baptist Missionary Society stations in Northern China by the Rev. T.M. Morris and Rev. Richard Glover.

My thanks to Redcliffe College for providing a copy of this public domain title for digitisation.

T.M. Morris [1830-1904], A Winter in North China with an Introduction by the Rev. Richard Glover of Bristol. London: The Religious Tract Society, 1892. Hbk. pp.256. [Click to visit the download page for this title]

Contents

  • Introduction
  • Author’s Preface
  1. From San Francisco to Yokohama
  2. Chefoo and Tien-Tsin
  3. From Tien-Tsin to Tsing-Chow-Fu
  4. Tsing-Chow-Fu
  5. Chow-Ping
  6. Chi-Nan-Fu
  7. The Great Plain of China
  8. T’ai-Yuen-Fu
  9. Peking
  10. An Interview with Li-Hung-Chang
  11. Shanghai
  12. Hankow, Hong-Kong, and Canton
  13. The Religions of China
  14. Fung-Shui
  15. Missionary Works and Methods in China

Author’s Preface

The question of sending out a deputation to China had long been considered by the committee of the Baptist Missionary Society, and our missionaries in China had been long asking that a deputation should be sent. ‘Our work,’ they said, ‘has been criticized by those who have never seen it, and who have known little or nothing of the circumstances in which and the conditions under which that work is being carried on. Our work has never been described but by ourselves, and there are many who think, and some who say, that we are not the fittest people to estimate the value of our own work. Send out, then, two men in whom you have confidence, and in whom we shall have confidence. Let them visit our stations and see our work with their own eyes, and on their return give a faithful, unbiassed report of what they have seen and heard. With that report, whatever may be its character, we shall be satisfied, and we trust you will be satisfied.’

The request was felt to be reasonable, but it was one which could not be easily complied with. In 1890, however, the committee felt that a deputation ought to be sent: out without further delay, and Dr. Glover and myself were asked to undertake the work. For myself, I may say that I never entered upon any work with more hesitation and reluctance; but there is now scarcely any part of my life upon which I look back with feelings of greater satisfaction. I am thankful, and ever shall be thankful, that I have been permitted to see something of that great work which God is carrying on in China.

Our instructions were to visit our own missionary stations in the two provinces of Shantung and Shansi, and report upon the work done. Further, we were to see all that could be seen of the work of other societies in those parts of China which we might visit. During our brief stay in that great empire we had the opportunity of inspecting the work of many missionary societies, and we were constantly moved to thank God for what we saw. We had read about missions in China, we had heard about them, and we were not disappointed when we were brought face to face with them; for extent, character, and worth they far exceeded our largest expectations; and so far from feeling that we had been deluded by exaggerated, extravagant, or garbled statements, we felt, as we passed from one mission station to another, that ‘ the half had not been told.’ Again and again have we said to missionary brethren as they have quietly unfolded to us the extent and results of the work in which they were engaged, ‘Why have you not told us this at home? It has all the charm of a romance.’

Pages 11-12

Thinking Black by Dan Crawford

Daniel Crawford [1870-1926], Thinking Black: 22 Years without a Break in the Long Grass of Central Africa, 2nd edn.
The Look-Out Hut. Onn the Cliff overhanging Lake Mweru

Dan Crawford’s account of his 22 Years work in the Congo. This volume has a number of superb colour plates. My thanks to Redcliffe College for providing a copy of this public domain book for digitisation.

Daniel Crawford [1870-1926], Thinking Black: 22 Years without a Break in the Long Grass of Central Africa, 2nd edn. London: Morgan and Scott Ltd., 1913. Hbk. pp.502. [Click to visit the Dan Crawford page for the download link to this title and others]

Contents

  • Publisher’s Note
  • Acknowledgments
  1. First Fears Justified
  2. First Things First
  3. Far, yet not Farthest, In
  4. Our African Apprenticeship
  5. “Boring in” Farther
  6. Eastward Ho!
  7. “Own Up and Pay Up”
  8. Dark Doings in Luvaleland
  9. The Desert Journey
  10. Farthest, but Shut, In
  11. Vice Versa
  12. Shut in, but Almost Out
  13. Black Suffragettes
  14. Thus Far and No Farther
  15. Red Sunsets
  16. “Nemesis, Daughter of Night”
  17. Our Eastern Exodus
  18. Boring out East
  19. Kavanaga: The Gates of the Morning
  20. “Great White Lake”
  21. A Page of History
  22. Black Man=Black Manners
  23. “THe Year of Love”: An Epilogue
  • L’Envoi
  • index


Kate Allenby of Mayurbhanj, India

Missionary Crusaders  by Claud Field 1
Kate Allenby [1871-1931]

Kate Allenby [1871-1931] was an Australian missionary to Mayurbhanj in Odisha State in Eastern India. This small book was written as a record of her work.

My thanks to Redcliffe College for providing a copy of this public domain title for digitisation.

G.B.G., Kate Allenby of Mayurbhanj. Brisbane, Queensland: Evangelical Missionary Society in Mayurbhanj, 1933. Pbk. pp.77. [Click to visit the download page for this title]

Contents

  • Foreword
  • Chapters 1-14
  • Appendix

Chapter 1

The purpose of this little volume is to Introduction bring before you as faithfully as possible the details of the life and work of Miss K. Allanby, who has just recently been laid to rest in Mayurbhanj, India, the scene of her labours for the past 40 years.

Shall we first take a brief glance into the home from whence she came, and at the parents to whom she owed the Christian influences of her childhood? Her fat her, Mr. Joseph Allanby, having lost his parents very early in Life, came out from England to Australia when quite a young man. He afterwards became a well-known hydropathist in Brisbane. Her mother, Mary Brady, was of Scottish descent, though born in Ireland. She was one of five sisters and was converted at an early age. Being the first, and for some time, the only Christian in the home, she was never fully understood by the other members of the family; although there were other converts afterwards, she had so out-distanced them in spiritual growth, that this feeling remained in spite of the fact that she always had a very strong affection for her sisters.

In the year 1865, accompanied by her mother and two of her sisters, she came out to Australia. It was on the voyage out that she first met Mr. Allanby, and they were afterwards married on January 25th, 1867, making their home in South Brisbane, Queensland.

Into this home Miss K. Allenby was born in the year 1871.

She was the second child in the family, the first being a son, who was dedicated to the Lord at birth, in the hope that, in after years, he would enter the ministry, but he died four months before his little sister Katie was born.

The parents’ hopes were now transferred to this second child. Thinking that, although she could not become a minister, she might, as a teacher, be used of the Lord, they set her apart to this end, and sought to give her the best education possible, to fit her for her future work.…

Page 1-2

Missionary Studies in the Acts of the Apostles by Thomas Walker

Thomas Walker [1859-1912], Missionary Ideals. Missionary Studies in the Acts of the Apostles

This is a manual written for Bible study groups intended to explain the missionary principles contained in the Acts of the Apostles. My thanks to Cambridge Centre For Christianity Worldwide for making a copy this public domain title available for digitisation.

Thomas Walker [1859-1912], Missionary Ideals. Missionary Studies in the Acts of the Apostles. London: Church Missionary Society, 1913. Hbk. pp.167. [Click to visit the download page for this title]

Contents

  • Suggestions For Study
  1. God’s Missionary Plan
  2. The Missionary’s Plan
  3. The Missionary’s Adversary
  4. A Missionary Centre
  5. A Missionary Designate
  6. A Missionary Campaign
  7. A Missionary Problem

Possible Uses of this Book

The readers of this book will come under three classes, individual readers, members of Bible-classes and members of Study Circles. The following suggestions for systematic study are intended for all these classes, except the last two paragraphs, which are specially addressed to individual readers and members of Bible-classes. A special set of suggestions to Leaders of Study Circles or Bible-classes will be sent upon application to the Missionary Study Secretary, C.M. House, Salisbury Square, London, E.C. No charge for them is made to Leaders of registered Circles.

Page 8

Zenana Ministry in China – Maud Elizabeth Boaz

A Buddhist Temple and Priests. Maud Elizabeth Boaz [1873-1937], "And the Villages thereof", page 48.
A Buddhist Temple and Priests, page 48.

Maud Elizabeth Boaz served with the Church of England Zenana Mission Society in China and writes of her experiences there. My thanks to Redcliffe College for making a copy of this public domain title available for digitisation.

Maud Elizabeth Boaz [1873-1937], “And the Villages thereof”. London: Morgan & Scott, [1925]. Hbk. pp.173. [Click to visit the download page for this title]

Contents

  1. “A Sower Went Forth”
  2. Among Thorns
  3. Some by the Wayside—Some an Hundredfold
  4. Grumbles
  5. Deeper Down—Farther Out
  6. Mediums
  7. Pearls and Their Polishing
  8. “New Year—Come! Bring Prosperity!”
  9. “Clear Shining After Rain!”
  10. Through a Mountain Pass
  11. The Fining Pot
  12. Through Much Tribulation
  13. Chrysanthemums and Churches
  14. Emergency Days
  15. What if the Light Fail?

Chapter 1: “A Sower Went Forth”

It is a glorious autumn morning, the sky a cloudless blue and the air cool, fresh, and exhilarating. We are ready early for our walk to the mountain villages.

In such air, under such a sky, bathed in such sunshine, with hearts overflowing with the gladness and joy of being entrusted with the “unsearchable riches” of the blessed Gospel, we start on our way, armed with Bibles and pictures for a day’s preaching. We are taking no food with us, preferring to trust to the hospitality of the village; even if we should find our trust misplaced, we still have “food to eat that they know not of.”

The road winds round and round a mountain, with rice-fields on our left hand; the rice is almost ripe, but looks as if it badly needs the rain to swell the grain. Every blade of grass is tipped with vermilion, the bracken is turning brown and gold, and every shrub has its own distinct colour and beauty. The mountain is covered with pine and furze, and the way is very lovely.

Somehow these Chinese village roads, as they wind in and out amongst the mountains, are captivating. We are always wanting to see what is round the corner; turning corners has the greatest fascination, and they draw us on and on. At every corner turned there lies a new picture spread before us, with here and there a peep of a far-away village or hamlet, hidden amongst the trees, or nestling cosily at the foot of a mountain. Again, of a sudden we are just in front of another without any warning whatever, except, it may be, the grunt of an old mother-pig, who is venerable and wise enough to be allowed to stray of her own sweet will, since she can be trusted to find her way back by supper-time!

Sometimes our way leads straight up a mountain pass, on and on, up and up, till we reach a small resthouse on the brow of the hill, with two seats and a roof. Blessed rest-houses! How thankfully we have sunk on to a seat, after a long and weary pull up under a blazing Chinese sun! These rest-houses have been built, in the spirit of true philanthropy, by kindly men and women who have wished to do some good deed during their lives. How many travellers have rested awhile under their cool shade, before passing down the mountain on the other side!

Pages 1-2.

For Christ and Cuzco, Peru – A Memorial of William H. Newell

A fruit seller of Peru

This is an account of the life and work of William H. Newell in Cuzco, Peru, with the Regions Beyond Missionary Union. My thanks to Redcliffe College for providing a copy of this public domain title for digitisation.

Martha Newell [1844-1934], For Christ and Cuzco. A Memorial of W.H. Newell, Missionary to Cuzco, Peru. London: Regions Beyond Missionary Union, n.d. Hbk. pp.164. [Click to visit the download page for this title]

Contents

  • Preface by H. Grattan Guinness, M.D.
  1. A Mother’s Recollections
  2. At Harley College, Bow
  3. At Cliff College, Derbyshire
  4. Called to Peru
  5. In Cuzco
  6. The Fight Continued
  7. Steps in Advance
  8. Last Days
  9. Afterwards

Preface

Amongst the hundreds of students with whom it has been my privilege to come into contact during the past nineteen years, some have been conspicuous for preaching gift and others for intellectual power; a number made their mark in the field of inter-college athletics; others, again, were influential as men of holiness and prayer; and many, though excellent men, were not’ in any way remarkable.

It would have been impossible, however, to lose sight of Will. Newell in the crowd. His bright face was sure to catch my eye at morning prayers, whilst his sweet tenor voice impressed one, even if fifty other men were joining in the hymn. His prayers were full of devotion, the evident expression of a Spirit-filled life.

Nor, on the other hand, could one overlook Newell on the cricket field, where, in imagination I see him now, fielding at point, or doing good service with the ball….

Page 9

Herbert Stanley Jenkins , Medical Missionary to Shensi, China

Portrait: Herbert Stanley Jenkins [1874-1913]
Frontispiece

Herbert Stanley Jenkins [1874-1913] served with the Baptist Missionary Society in China. This biography also includes some material on the wider work of the BMS there.

My thanks to Redcliffe College for providing a copy of this public domain title for digitisation.

Richard Glover [1837-1919], Herbert Stanley Jenkins, M.D., F.R.C.S., Medical Missionary, Shensi, China with Some Notices of the Work of the Baptist Missionary Society in that Country. London: The Carey Press, 1914. Hbk. pp.155.

Contents

  • Author’s Note
  1. Earlier years
  2. The Work of the Baptist Missionary Society in China
  3. Shensi Work
  4. Entrance on Missionary Work
  5. The Medical Missionary
  6. The Revolution
  7. The Last Stage
  8. Some General Reflections
  9. Letters From Friends

Chapter 1: Earlier Years

The proper study of mankind is man – a study full of instruction for those who pursue it with real earnestness. The strange way in which purposes are formed, expanded, and achieved by inspirations of grace, and the honour which God puts on all faithfulness, demand attention. There is especial interest in noting how Providence, operating simultaneously on individual lives and also on nations, secures augmented results from each.

The outward features of Stanley Jenkins’ earlier life are soon told. He was born in Bristol in 1874; one of the younger members of a large family, most of them marked by physical energy, and constituting a typically happy and united home; a home where the Herbert Stanley Jenkins parents blended happily authority, love, and piety, and where the number of the children supplied the genial corrective of all selfish tendencies; a home, therefore, where all natural excellences might be expected to thrive, where good health and good temper prevented any early and weakening development of self-consciousness, where it was natural that all kindly qualities should develop.

In the history of his school-days nothing very remarkable is to be noticed, save that while still a youth (in his fourteenth year) the great awakening of the soul came to him.

Parental piety was the atmosphere in which his higher thoughts and purposes were matured. He was greatly helped by some of those activities which devote themselves to the spiritual quickening of the schoolboy. Some may criticize defects in these activities, saying they develop unduly self-consciousness, are too doctrinal in their presentation of the Gospel, and give a trend to the devout life tending to make it narrow, and lead to the idea that character is complete when conversion to God has taken place. Possibly there are grounds in some instances for such views. In the case of Stanley Jenkins no such influence can be traced. The great fact of his life was that Jesus Christ then aawned on his soul. In the language of St. Paul, “The light of the knowledge of the glory of God shone through the fac~ of Jesus Christ into his heart,” flooding it with a sunshine that never failed, but grew until it became the light of heaven….

Pages 11-13

By Canoe to Cannibal-Land by John Henry Holmes

John Henry Holmes [1866-1934], By Canoe to Cannibal-Land

This is a fictionalised account of missionary life in Papua New Guinea. My thanks to Redcliffe College for providing a copy of this title for digitisation.

John Henry Holmes [1866-1934], By Canoe to Cannibal-Land. London: London Missionary Society, 1923. Hbk. pp.144. [Click to visit the download page for this title]

Contents

  • Foreword
  1. Where Lari Found God
  2. Westward Bound
  3. Who is Avi?
  4. In the Ravi River
  5. Golgotha—A Place of Skulls
  6. A Night of Surprise
  7. A Morning Dip
  8. Sunday at Ravi
  9. A Day of Surprises
  10. Cross Currents
  11. Homeward Bound

Foreword

By Canoe to Cannibal-land” is a Papuan story of a missionary journey in the Gulf of Papua, New Guinea, told by Papuan boys in a Papuan way. The story is written in this way so that readers may discover what the thoughts of the Papuans are and what they talk about to one another. The names of the boys, men, rivers and villages have all been changed into easier forms to enable British readers to read and utter them. The ” Old Man” of the story was, as will be guessed, a missionary, and was so named, as a Papuan form of respect, when he was not called Homu.

Page 6

6 Missionary Heroes of Africa

Cover: John C. Lambert [1857-1917], Missionary Heroes in Africa. True Stories of the Intrepid Bravery and Stirring Adventures of Missionaries with Uncivilised Man, Wild Beasts and the Forces of Nature

There are numerous volumes in the “Missionary Heroes” series, consisting of short biographies written to inspire and challenge young people by their examples. The “heroes” covered in this volume are:

My thanks to Redcliffe College for providing a copy of this public domain book for digitisation.

John C. Lambert [1857-1917], Missionary Heroes in Africa. True Stories of the Intrepid Bravery and Stirring Adventures of Missionaries with Uncivilised Man, Wild Beasts and the Forces of Nature. London: Seeley, Service & Co. Ltd., [1909]. Hbk. pp.156. [Click to visit he download page for this title]

Contents

  • Prefactory Note
  • Introduction
  1. “The Hero of Uganda”
  2. The Lion-Hearted Bishop
  3. Pioneers in Nyasaland
  4. Wortrekkers in Barotseland
  5. A Pioneer in Garenganze
  6. A Tramp Through the Great Pygmy Forest

Introduction

In a “foreword” which he contributes to Dr. Jacob Chamberlain’s attractive missionary book, In the Tiger Jitng-le, Dr. Francis E. Clark expresses the opinion that one need not patronize sensational and unhealthy fiction to find stirring adventure and thrilling narrative, and then goes on to say:-

“There is one source which furnishes stories of intense and dramatic interest, abounding in novel situations and spiced with abundant adventure ; and this source is at the same time the purest and most invigorating fountain at which our youth can drink. To change the figure, this is a mine hitherto largely unworked; it contains rich nuggets of ore, which will well repay the prospector in this new field.”

The field to which Dr. Clark refers is the history of modern Christian missions. His meaning is that the adventurous and stirring side of missionary experience needs to be brought out, and emphasis laid upon the fact that the romantic days of missions are by no means past.
There are stories which are now among the classics of missionary romance. Such are the expedition of Hans Egede to Greenland, the lonely journeys of David Brainerd among the Indian tribes of the North American forests, the voyage of John Williams from one coral island of the Pacific to another in the little ship which his own hands had built, the exploration of the Dark Continent by David Livingstone in the hope of emancipating the black man’s soul.

But among missionary lives which are more recent or less known, there are many not less noble or less thrilling than those just referred to; and the chapters which follow are an attempt to make this plain.

There is, of course, a deeper side to Christian missions-a side that is essential and invariable – while the elements of adventure and romance are accidental and occasional. If in these pages the spiritual aspects of foreign mission work are but slightly touched upon, it is not because they are either forgotten or ignored, but simply because it was not part of the writer’s present plan to deal with them. It is hoped, nevertheless, that some of those into whose hands this book may come will be induced by what they read to make fuller acquaintance with the lives and aims of our missionary heroes, and so will catch something of that spirit which led them to face innumerable dangers, toils, and trials among heathen and often savage peoples, whether in the frozen North or the burning South, whether in the hidden depths of some vast continent or among the scattered “islands of the ocean seas.”

Pages 9-11