Christine Isabel Tinling’s Budget From Barbary

Christine Isabel Tinling [1869-1943], A Budget From BarbaryThis little book contains twelve letters about missionary work in “Barbary” – modern day Algeria, Libya, Morocco and Tunisia. This copy originally formed part of the North Africa Mission library in Rabat. Yorkshire-born Christine Tinling [1867-1943] was a missionary with the  Women’s Christian Temperance Union was the author of numerous books on missions and also served in the Far East and India.

Christine Isabel Tinling [1869-1943], A Budget From Barbary. London: Richard J. James, 1933. Pbk. pp.153. [Download complete book in PDF].

Contents

  1. The Ministry of Medicine
  2. The Message in the Market
  3. Among Veiled Women
  4. Snaps From a City
  5. An Industrial Effort
  6. Aboutt he Kabyles
  7. Fishing For Men
  8. Handicaps
  9. Jew and Gentile
  10. Many Adversaries
  11. The Foreign Legion
  12. The Cost of Confession

Extract from pages 12-13.

The women particularly need that sympathy. It is terrible to see what they suffer, often so unnecessarily, from inefficient native midwifery. One girl lying there has been through five operations and has been cast off by her husband. If she gets well, her people will be marrying her to somebody else. As long as she remains in that hospital bed she is an individual, a soul to be loved and helped. When she leaves she will once more become a chattel and a slave. She is much interested in the Gospel and knows the choruses and hymns by heart and nurse says she is wonderfully sweet and patient.

Another has suffered much agony without a word of complaint and is an example to all in the ward. In a nearby bed is a girl of twenty who is married to a man of seventy and is in hospital on account of brutal treatment from native midwives. The Moslem women are born to trouble and expect nothing else from life. They have learned to endure silently and I suppose no-one has any idea what they do go through, except the medical missionary and the nurse. [Continue reading]

Life of William Percival Johnson Archdeacon of Nyasa

William Percival Johnson [1854-1928] was a missionary of the Anglo-Catholic Universities’ Mission to Central Africa. He was know as the “Apostle of the Lake” [Lake Nyasa] in what is now Malawi. He opposed the unnecessary imposition of European culture in Africa. This short biography of Johnson is in the Public Domain.

Dora Yarnton Mills [1859-?], A Hero Man. The Life and Adventures of William Percival Johnson Archdeacon of Nyasa, 2nd edn. London: Universities’ Mission to Central Africa, 1933. Hbk. pp.64. [Download complete book in PDF]

Contents

Prologue

  1. Early Days
  2. Africa Calls
  3. The Adventure Begins
  4. Towards the Goal
  5. Life at Masasi
  6. The Vollage of Released Slaves
  7. Privations in an African Village
  8. A Set-Back
  9. The Lake at Last
  10. The Lonely Trail
  11. “In Journeyings Often”
  12. Stricken With Bindness
  13. The “Charles Janson” Launched
  14. “In Perils From the Heathen”
  15. Building Up The Church
  16. The Care of the Villages
  17. The Steamer “Chauncy Maples”
  18. How the African Lives
  19. The Hero Honoured
  20. The End of the Adventure

Chapter 1

Early Days

When a certain boy, named William Percival Johnson, came to Bedford Grammar School, his comrades very soon found he had ideas and a will of his own. A strong will is a fine thing if it is rightly controlled. Johnson kept his in order all right. From the beginning he was a leader. He had not been in the school long before he was head of all the games in his school house. Whatever he did, whether work or play, he did it with all his might. Among his school-fellows he made friends, but expected them to come up to his idea of friendship and in those early days he was inclined to be hard on those who did not reach his standard.

He was a brilliant mathematician, keen and eager when other boys were dull or stupid. He did not waste his school-days, but got as much good out of them as he possibly could.

When his schooldays were over, he went to University College, Oxford, and there he soon made his mark, not only in the College, where he worked as before with all his might, but on the river, where he stroked his college boat to victory at the head of the river. Some of you have probably watched this race and know the great excitement and enthusiasm which thrills the onlooker.

“Johnson was determined to win; you could see that by the earnest look on his face as day by day he practised on the river.” So testified the master of his college. And that determination and pertinacity were among the most distinguished characteristics of his many-sided character. [Continue reading]

God’s Missionary Plan for the World by J.W. Bashford

James Whitford Bashford [1848-1919] wrote this biblical theology of mission after spending 15 years as a Methodist bishop in China. He worked for the unification of Methodism within China, but opposed independence from the American church. This book is in the public domain.

James Whitford Bashford [1849-1919], God’s Missionary Plan for the World. London: Robert Culley, [1910]. Hbk. pp.178. [Download entire book in PDF]

Contents

Preface

  1. The Divine Purpose
  2. The Divine Order of Procedure
  3. The Old Testament and Missions
  4. The New Testament and Missions
  5. The Divine Method of Securing Power
  6. The Divine Method of Securing Workers
  7. The Divine Method of Securing Results
  8. The Divine Providence and Missions

Preface

In Chungking, China, in January, 1905, I found a very suggestive volume by Rev. R. F. Horton, entitled The Bible a Missionary Book. It was the only volume in West China and had just arrived. Hence I could not accept the loan of it so kindly offered, and I had only a little time to read it while busy with other cares. But the argument and the title of the book took possession of me; and during the succeeding months of travel and meditation, I read the Bible through from the missionary view-point; and the present volume took shape.

If the· volume does not speak for itself no further words can now avail. I need only add that I am indebted to Dr. H. K. Carroll, Secretary of the Board of Foreign Missions of the Methodist Episcopal Church, for valuable suggestions and also for the title of the volume, which is a more ambitious one than I had selected; to Rev. Stephen V. R. Ford for valuable statistics; and to Dr. F. D. Gamewell, Mr. Charles H. Fahs, Mr. Morris W. Ehnes, and Mr. G. F. Sutherland for exceedingly valuable information; and to Rev. C. H. Morgan, Ph. D., for preparing the running titles and the index. [Continue reading]

Century of Baptist Missions

A Century of Baptist Missions offers a summary of the work of American Baptist Missions from their foundation up to around 1890. It covers their work in Burma (Myanmar), India, China, Japan, Africa, Brazil, Cuba, France, Germany, Sweden, Italy, Denmark, Greece, Spain and Turkey. This book is in the Public Domain.

Sophie Bronson Titterington [1846-?], A Century of Baptist Foreign Missions. An Outline Sketch. Philadelphia: American Baptist Publication Society, 1891. Hbk. pp.300. [Download complete book in PDF]

Contents

  1. The Dawn in England
  2. Beginnings in America

    Burman Missions

  3. A New Gold Mine
  4. Early Lights and Shadows – Martyr Sufferings
  5. Rewards and Results
  6. Varied Experiences – Enlargement
  7. Helping Hands
  8. Sorrow and Joy
  9. Later Years

    Karen Mission

  10. A Fire Kindled
  11. Jungle Victories
  12. Success in Adversity
  13. Sunshine and Shadow
  14. Looking Beyond
  15. Trial and Victory

    Missions in Assam

  16. Lenthening Cords
  17. Progress in Assam
  18. The Kohls, Nagas, and Garos

    Shan Mission

  19. Mountain Heathen
  20. Sowing and Reaping

    Missions in China

  21. The Chinese Mission at Bangkok
  22. From Macoa to Swatow
  23. Results
  24. The Canton Mission
  25. Quiet Growth in China
  26. Central China Mission
  27. Northern China or Shantung Mission
  28. Western China Station

    Telugu Mission

  29. The Seed Planters
  30. Early Sheaves
  31. Later Harvests

    Missions in Japan

  32. Open Doors in Japan
  33. Promise and Perplexity
  34. The Crisis in Japan

    Missions in Africa

  35. The Old and the New
  36. Light in Darkness
  37. Missions of the Southern Board

    Missions in Western Hemisphere

  38. Missions in Brazil
  39. MIssions in Cuba
  40. Missions in Mexico

    Missions in Europe

  41. The Mission in France
  42. The Mission in Germany
  43. The Mission in Sweden
  44. The Mission in Italy
  45. Missions in Denmark, Greece, Spain
  46. The Publication Society’s Work in Turkey
  47. Our Century

History of the Universities’ Central Mission to Africa

A.E.M. Anderson-Morshead [1845-1928], The History of the Universities' Mission to Central Africa 1859-1898, 2nd ednThe Universities’ Central Mission to Africa (c.1857 – 1965) was set up by Anglican graduates from the Universities of Oxford, Cambridge, Cambridge, Durham and Dublin. It’s work was concentrated on Nyasaland (now Malawi) and Zanzibar (now a semi-autonomous part of Tanzania). For more information about the mission, see this Wikipedia article (which does not link to this book yet). This history covers the years 1859-1898 and is now in the Public Domain.

A.E.M. Anderson-Morshead [1845-1928], The History of the Universities’ Mission to Central Africa 1859-1898, 2nd edn. London: Office of the Universities’ Mission to Central Africa, 1899. Hbk. pp.494. [This material is in the Public Domain]

Contents

Author’s Preface
Preface
Chronological Table

  1. The Call to the Work
  2. The Shiré Highlands
  3. War, Famine, and Pestilence
  4. New Ground
  5. A Fellow-Worker
  6. The Church in the Slave Market
  7. Daily Work in the Island and on the Mainland
  8. On the Edge of the Wilderness
  9. Lake Nyasa
  10. Last Days of Bishop Steere
  11. The Mission on the Lake
  12. Christian Villages on the Rovuma
  13. Magila in the Bondé Country
  14. The Usambara Group of Missions
  15. The Years in Zanzibar
  16. The Chief Pastors
  17. A Parting View of the Mission
  18. After Two Years
  19. Slavery

Appendices

  1. Methods of Home Work
  2. Methods of Mission Work
  3. Constitutional History of the Mission
  4. Synodical Action
  5. English Members of the Mission

Alexander Mackay – Missionary Hero of Uganda

Andrew Melrose [1836-1901], Alexander Mackay. Missionary Hero of UgandaAlexander Mackay [1849-1890] was a Scottish pioneer engineer missionary to Uganda and worked with the Church Missionary Society. John Roxboxborough notes that: “Mackay’s spiritual depth and practical skills were popularized by his sister’s biography and admired for generations.” [Evangelical Dictionary of World Missions, 589]. This biography written by Andrew Melrose [1836-1901], who also wrote under the name E.A. MacDonald, and is in the Public Domain.

Andrew Melrose [1836-1901], Alexander Mackay. Missionary Hero of Uganda. London: Sunday School Union, n.d. Hbk. pp.144. [Download entire book in PDF]

Contents

  1. A Good Beginning
  2. Chossing His Life Work
  3. On African Soil
  4. Dangers and Difficulties
  5. A Visit to Lkonge
  6. Arrival at Uganda
  7. King Mtesa
  8. Disappointment
  9. Labour and Results
  10. Strange Tasks
  11. Building the ‘Eleanor’
  12. King Mwanga
  13. Uganda Martyrs
  14. Good-bye to Uganda
  15. Friends and Fellow-workers
  16. Last Days

Preface by The Rev. T. C. Wilson (C.M.S.)

It was in the early part of 1876 that I made the acquaintance of A. M. Mackay, when, having offered for the mission to Uganda, I went up to London to meet those who were to be my fellow-missionaries in the ‘Dark Continent.’ He sailed before me to Zanzibar, but we met again / there for a short time. Then I left the coast with our first caravan, and a long time was to elapse before we were to see each other again.

Two years passed; Lieutenant Smith and Mr. O’Neill had been murdered in December 1877, when in the summer of 1878, having been nearly a year alone in Uganda, I heard from Mackay that he was sending up some stores to Kagei (at the southern end of the Nyanza) in charge of a native. Mtesa allowed me to go to meet this man, and after a voyage of more than a month in native canoes, one evening a point near Kagei came in sight. The canoe-men were weary, and wanted to stop for the night where we were; ‘it was too far,’ ‘it was getting dark,’ ‘they did not know the bay.’ I over-came their scruples, took a paddle and guided the canoes. [Continue reading]

Zenana Missions in India

What were Zenana Missions? Zenana refers “…to the part of a house belonging to a Hindu or Muslim family in South Asia which is reserved for the women of the household.” These women were almost completely isolated from wider society and had no access to any kind of medical care. Male missionaries could not preach the Gospel to them, but female missionary doctors could – hence the growth in the late 19th Century of Zenana medical missions. This little book provides some stories from the life of one of these pioneering ladies. It appears by kind permission of the Church Missionary Society.

Charlotte S. Vines, A Woman Doctor On the Frontier. London: Church of England Zenana Mission, 1925. Pnk. pp.78. [Click to download in PDF format]

Contents

The Avalache

  1. A Jigsaw Puzzle
  2. Our Hospital
  3. Our Road
  4. Fatama
  5. Martha and Mary
  6. The Cripple
  7. Zargulla
  8. A Frontier Village
  9. Little Jewel
  10. A Sunday Case
  11. The Village of Eggs
  12. Witchcraft
  13. The Donkey Woman

The Cross

The Avalanche

In a lovely upland valley, one of the hillsides was covered with a forest of great trees. The view was very beautiful; on this side of the valley snow-on that, a wooded slope. We wandered into that wood; it was damp and dark, the sun could scarcely penetrate it, and many dank weeds flourished.

We went up another year and, looking towards our forest, saw but a great bare hillside; all down the valley huge trunks of trees lay scattered and the hill was cropped and brown as if some giant had reaped it with a mighty scythe. Our view was spoilt; our hill all scarred and ugly. What had happened?

Said the hillmen: “In the winter, when no man may live here, there was a mighty avalanche; it swept down the valley and everything in its course was torn up-even the earth was ploughed bare.” Our servants, who cared nothing for the view, said: “Great good fortune has come to us! See. the wood for lighting our fires and for burning has come down right to our very tents! We have but to step out and there is our wood.”

Next year again we went up and looked toward our mountains. Oh, the change! New life had come; the whole hillside was a tender, lovely green. We climbed, and lo! the hillside was covered with wonderful flowers-green grass and flowers. An old shepherd pointed upwards and said: “That snow did us a great benefit; now our animals can feed well and we can watch them easily.”

Yet we, with our short sight, had said: ” Oh, how cruel-why do such things happen?” [Continue reading]

Story of the London Missionary Society by C.S. Horne

C. Silvester Horne, The Story of the L.M.S. with an Appendix Bringing the Story up to the Year 1904, new ednI cannot think of the London Missionary Society without their work in the Pacific Ocean coming to mind. The transformation of the people of the Pacific Islands by the power of the Gospel was truly dramatic and accounts found their way into popular culture through such books as The Coral Island. Much of the information in R.M. Ballantyne’s book was drawn from accounts of missionary’s working there, as Ballantyne had never travelled in the Pacific.

The L.M.S.’s innovative use of missionary ships is noteworthy and their legacy can be found today in such ministries as Mercy Ships and Operation Mobilisation. The work of the L.M.S. however was truly global, reaching Africa, Asia and South America. This book provides a comprehensive account of its work up to 1904. It contains a great many pictures which I wanted to include in greyscale to preserve their quality, so the file size of this book is much higher than usual (22MB).

C. Silvester Horne, The Story of the L.M.S. with an Appendix Bringing the Story up to the Year 1904, new edn. London: London Missionary Society, 1908. Hbk. pp.460. [Click to download in PDF]

Contents

  1. Laying the Foundation
  2. The South Seas
  3. South Africa
  4. India
  5. China
  6. British Guiana
  7. Madagascar
  8. Expansion in Polynesia
  9. Southern and Centra; Africa
  10. Progress in India
  11. Further Work in China
  12. Developments in Madagascar
  13. North China and Mongolia
  14. New Guinea
  15. Summary

Appendix
Index

The London Missionary Society Steamship "John Williams"

 

George Smith’s Short History of Christian Missions

George Smith [1856-1942], Short History of Christian Missions From Abraham and Paul to CareyGeorge Smith’s Short History of Christian Missions provides an overview of Missions from Abraham up to 1901. The treatments are necessarily brief, but should prove of interest to students. The fact that it went though eight editions indicates at the very least that it was considered useful in its day. This book is now in the Public Domain.

George Smith [1856-1942], Short History of Christian Missions From Abraham and Paul to Carey, 8th edn, Livingstone, and Duff. Edinburgh: T & T Clark, n.d. Hbk. pp.252.  [Click to download complete book in PDF]

Contents

Introduction

Part 1: Jadaic Preparation, B.C. 2000 to A.D. 70

1. The Missionary Covenant – Foundation of the City of God in History

2. Judaism the First Missionary Religion

3. Christ the King of the Missionary Host – the Missionary Charge

4. The Holy Spirit the Leader of the Missionary Host

Part 2 – Latin Preparation, A.D. 70 to 1792

5. The Roman Empire Subdued by the City of God

6. The Conversion of the Scots and English

7. The Conversion of the Goths and Franks

8. The Conversion of the Teutons and Northmen

9. Mission to Slavs, Mohammedans, and Jews

10. The Reformation Only Indirectly Missionary

11. The Dawn of Modern Missions – The Danish-Halle and Moravian Missions

12. The Dawn of Modern Missions – The English in North America and in India

13. The Missionary Compromise of the Latin Church with Heathenism

Part 3 – English-Speaking Universal Evangelization, 1792-1913

14. Foundation of English Missions – William Carey the First English Missionary to India, 1791-1834

15. The Great Missionary and Bible Societies, 1792

17. The Churches Become Missionary, 1830

18. Evangelical Missions and Mankind

Index

 

Mary Slessor The Dundee Factory Girl by J.J. Ellis

J.J. Ellis [1853-?], Mary Slessor. The Dundee Factory Girl who became a Devoted African MissionaryThe story of Mary Mitchell Slessor’s [1848-1915] work in Calabar, Nigeria was truly remarkable, as Andrew C. Ross notes in the Biographical Dictionary of Christian Missions. [p.624.]:

Her life is an example of Christian inculturation, but regrettably it was trivialized by a romantic “white queen of Okoyong” attitude toward her in Britain.

J.J. Ellis [1853-?], Mary Slessor. The Dundee Factory Girl who became a Devoted African Missionary. Kilmarnock: John Ritchie, n.d. Hbk. pp.80. [Click to download in PDF]

Contents

Foreword

  1. A Young Christian who was old enough to win souls
  2. A Loyal Missionary with Ideas and Visions of her own
  3. A Bold Pioneer who greatly dared for Christ; A Call for Courage in our Work for God
  4. A Good “Ma” who was also a Great Queen. A Proof that Love always conquers
  5. A Poor Woman who was enriched by what she gave above; A Sure method of securing True Wealth

Chapter 1

“One of the deepest instincts of our ·nature teaches the preciousness of severity,” said John Addington Symonds, but it is hard to believe him while the soul stings with injustice, hardship, or pain. Mary Slessor born at Gilcomston by Aberdeen, 2nd December, 1848, was educated under the harshest conditions, but she was kept sweet by the love of God in her frail mother. She had few advantages, and many crushing difficulties, but she shows what can be done by those who have few chances, but who are Christ’s, and are willing to be nothing, that He may be glorified. First the lassie was brought out of nature’s darkness and at once set to work to carry the light to others, and all her days she went forward carrying the lamp to show everyone the way to happiness and peace.

Her father was a shoemaker, and at times sober, kindly and tender. But he lacked a saving interest in Christ, and before long became a victim of the drink sin. Gradually the octopus arms tightened their grip, and the more they grasped the less the deluded man desired to be free. Mary’s mother was one of those sweet, frail women for whom a bad man has a fascination. The mothering instinct is useful but it can be perverted as it was in this case, for that husband grew the worse the more he was loved.  [Continue reading]