By Canoe to Cannibal-Land by John Henry Holmes

John Henry Holmes [1866-1934], By Canoe to Cannibal-Land

This is a fictionalised account of missionary life in Papua New Guinea. My thanks to Redcliffe College for providing a copy of this title for digitisation.

John Henry Holmes [1866-1934], By Canoe to Cannibal-Land. London: London Missionary Society, 1923. Hbk. pp.144. [Click to visit the download page for this title]

Contents

  • Foreword
  1. Where Lari Found God
  2. Westward Bound
  3. Who is Avi?
  4. In the Ravi River
  5. Golgotha—A Place of Skulls
  6. A Night of Surprise
  7. A Morning Dip
  8. Sunday at Ravi
  9. A Day of Surprises
  10. Cross Currents
  11. Homeward Bound

Foreword

By Canoe to Cannibal-land” is a Papuan story of a missionary journey in the Gulf of Papua, New Guinea, told by Papuan boys in a Papuan way. The story is written in this way so that readers may discover what the thoughts of the Papuans are and what they talk about to one another. The names of the boys, men, rivers and villages have all been changed into easier forms to enable British readers to read and utter them. The ” Old Man” of the story was, as will be guessed, a missionary, and was so named, as a Papuan form of respect, when he was not called Homu.

Page 6

6 Missionary Heroes of Africa

Cover: John C. Lambert [1857-1917], Missionary Heroes in Africa. True Stories of the Intrepid Bravery and Stirring Adventures of Missionaries with Uncivilised Man, Wild Beasts and the Forces of Nature

There are numerous volumes in the “Missionary Heroes” series, consisting of short biographies written to inspire and challenge young people by their examples. The “heroes” covered in this volume are:

My thanks to Redcliffe College for providing a copy of this public domain book for digitisation.

John C. Lambert [1857-1917], Missionary Heroes in Africa. True Stories of the Intrepid Bravery and Stirring Adventures of Missionaries with Uncivilised Man, Wild Beasts and the Forces of Nature. London: Seeley, Service & Co. Ltd., [1909]. Hbk. pp.156. [Click to visit he download page for this title]

Contents

  • Prefactory Note
  • Introduction
  1. “The Hero of Uganda”
  2. The Lion-Hearted Bishop
  3. Pioneers in Nyasaland
  4. Wortrekkers in Barotseland
  5. A Pioneer in Garenganze
  6. A Tramp Through the Great Pygmy Forest

Introduction

In a “foreword” which he contributes to Dr. Jacob Chamberlain’s attractive missionary book, In the Tiger Jitng-le, Dr. Francis E. Clark expresses the opinion that one need not patronize sensational and unhealthy fiction to find stirring adventure and thrilling narrative, and then goes on to say:-

“There is one source which furnishes stories of intense and dramatic interest, abounding in novel situations and spiced with abundant adventure ; and this source is at the same time the purest and most invigorating fountain at which our youth can drink. To change the figure, this is a mine hitherto largely unworked; it contains rich nuggets of ore, which will well repay the prospector in this new field.”

The field to which Dr. Clark refers is the history of modern Christian missions. His meaning is that the adventurous and stirring side of missionary experience needs to be brought out, and emphasis laid upon the fact that the romantic days of missions are by no means past.
There are stories which are now among the classics of missionary romance. Such are the expedition of Hans Egede to Greenland, the lonely journeys of David Brainerd among the Indian tribes of the North American forests, the voyage of John Williams from one coral island of the Pacific to another in the little ship which his own hands had built, the exploration of the Dark Continent by David Livingstone in the hope of emancipating the black man’s soul.

But among missionary lives which are more recent or less known, there are many not less noble or less thrilling than those just referred to; and the chapters which follow are an attempt to make this plain.

There is, of course, a deeper side to Christian missions-a side that is essential and invariable – while the elements of adventure and romance are accidental and occasional. If in these pages the spiritual aspects of foreign mission work are but slightly touched upon, it is not because they are either forgotten or ignored, but simply because it was not part of the writer’s present plan to deal with them. It is hoped, nevertheless, that some of those into whose hands this book may come will be induced by what they read to make fuller acquaintance with the lives and aims of our missionary heroes, and so will catch something of that spirit which led them to face innumerable dangers, toils, and trials among heathen and often savage peoples, whether in the frozen North or the burning South, whether in the hidden depths of some vast continent or among the scattered “islands of the ocean seas.”

Pages 9-11

‘For His Sake’: Elsie Marshall’s Life of Consecration and Devotion to China

Elsie Marshall [1869-1895]

Elsie Marshall served in China with the Church of England Zenana Mission Society until her untimely death in 1885. This is her story, told through extracts of her letters. My thanks to Redcliffe College for providing a copy of this public domain title for digitisation.

Elsie Marshall [1869-1895], ‘For His Sake’. A Record of a Life consecrated to God and devoted to China. Extracts From the Letters of Elsie Marshall, Martyred at Hwa-Sang, August 1, 1895, 6th edn. London: The Religious Tract Society, n.d. Hbk. pp.208. [Click to visit the download page for digitisation]

Contents

  • Introductory Memoir
  1. The Voyage Out
  2. Arrival in China
  3. At Fuh-ning
  4. At Kulianf, on the Hills near Foochow
  5. At Fuh-ning
  6. At Ku-cheng
  7. At Work in the District
  8. Kuliang For Hot Months and Journeys
  9. Sek-Check-Du
  10. Work Disttributed by the Vegetarian Riots, Which Ended in the Massacre at Hws-Sang, Ku-Cheng, August 1, 1895
  11. Extracts from Letters

Introductory Memoir

A short sketch of the life of the writer of the following record of missionary work in China will perhaps enhance its interest for the general reader, and make clear some of the personal allusions, which could not be well omitted without breaking the continuity of the letters. The letters themselves are published in the hope, and with the earnest prayer, in which it is certain the writer would (and perchance does) join, that their perusal may stir up still greater zeal in hastening forward the King’s business in the land of Sinim, which recent events-and not least amongst them the martyrdoms at Ku-cheng-will assuredly open up to the ‘ Divine Enterprise of Missions’; and lead many to adopt what she found to be the happiest of all lives: to give up home ‘for His sake,”in order to go and tell the love of Jesus to those who have never heard.

Page 3

Zenana Bible and Medical Missions in India

Cover: Ella Mary Weatherley [1870-1921], From West to East. Being the Story of a Recent Visit to Indian Missions

Ella Mary Weatherley was the Honorary Secretary of the Zenana Bible and Medical Mission (ZBMM) (which today has become Interserve). In around 1909 she undertook a tour of ZBMM station across India and this book is the substance of her report.

My thanks to Redcliffe College for providing a copy of this public domain title for digitisation.

Ella Mary Weatherley [1870-1921], From West to East. Being the Story of a Recent Visit to Indian Missions. London: Zenana Bible and Medical Mission, [1910]. Hbk. pp.128. [Click to visit the download page for this title]

Contents

  • Introduction
  1. Port Said
  2. Bombay
  3. Nasik
  4. Manmad
  5. Agra
  6. Cawnpore
  7. Lucknow
  8. Khurja and Bulandshahr
  9. Dehli
  10. Lamore and Kasur
  11. Benares
  12. Gorakhpur
  13. Allahabad
  14. Sultanpur
  15. Jaunpur
  16. Patna
  17. Valtoha
  18. Patti
  19. Parantij—Bombay
  20. Panchgani anbd Sholapur

Introduction by the Right Rev E.G. Ingram, D.D. [1851-1926]

I have lately been travelling over much of the ground covered by Miss Weatherley, and it is a pleasure to write a few words by way of calling attention to the sort of information she is now in a position to afford to those who are willing to know the facts about our thin Missionary fighting line.

First of all let me say that I am a great believer in the value of the impression a visitor is in a position to convey. Again and again during my Far Eastern journeys Missionaries have said, “It would never have occurred to us to put that down.” And they admitted that probably their very familiarity with the scenes in the midst of which they live has made them a little absent-minded as to the sort of facts the workers in the homeland want most to hear about. So true it is that “lookers on see most of the game!”

Then again I am anxious to say again and again that it is necessary for the Home base and the front to be intelligently and sympathetically linked together. Though doubted whether the Mission wants the casual visitor, there can be no doubt that anyone who comes from the Home Committee with a desire to give to fellow-workers the right hand of fellowship, and to get to understand their problems at first hand, will receive a warm welcome and will do much good.

Such a visit as that described in the following pages will be a distinct asset. Everything Miss Weatherley reads or hears will come to her now with a new intelligence, and the word in season will come easy both in Conference and in Committee.

The stages are constantly changing. The sort of work and worker needed yesterday may not be wanted to-morrow. The emergence of an indigenous Christianity means greater changes still. The Missionaries will do better work in proportion as they realize they have an intelligent and co-operative base behind them.

Schwartz of Tanjore by Jesse Page

Jesse Page, Schwartz of Tanjore.

Christian Friedrich Schwartz was a German Lutheran missionary who served in India for 48 years. I have tried to find the date of death for the author of this biography, Jesse Page. Finding no record of his birth or death I contacted the only one of his publishers still in existence and they agreed with my conclusion that the name was pseudonymous. As he, whoever he was, was almost certainly dead before 1948, judging by the date of his first book I am assuming that his works are in the public domain. If anyone can throw any further light on this, do get in touch with me. My thanks to the Cambridge Centre for Christianity Worldwide for making this book available for digitisation.

Jesse Page, Schwartz of Tanjore. London: SPCK, 1921. Hbk. pp.203. [Click to visit the Christian Friedrich Schwartz page for the download link for this title]

Contents

  • Preface
  1. How Christianity Came to India
  2. the Friar and the Lutheran
  3. From College to Mission Field
  4. In Touch with the Brahmins
  5. Amid War’s Alarms
  6. A Glimpse of the Man Himself
  7. Wayside Work
  8. In First Touch with Tanjore
  9. As Peacemaker with Hyder Ali
  10. The Strain Begins to Tell
  11. Tuljajee and Serfogee
  12. Responsilities and Patience
  13. A Noble Defence on Missions
  14. The Shadows Lengthen
  15. The Home Going
  16. The Memory of the Just
  • Index

Preface

There is one reason; amongst others, why the memory of Christian Frederick Schwartz deserves to be kept green in the history of missions. It is not generally known that the consuming passion for the conversion of the heathen which burned in the soul of Henry Martyn was kindled at the torch of this veteran witness for the faith. While still a student at Cambridge, Martyn was profoundly impressed by reading his journal and letters, and when he himself arrived in India, ten years after the death of Schwartz, he took counsel with many who, like Dr. Kerr, could stir his heart with first-hand stories of the venerable missionary they had known and loved so well. Happily for us, these records which moved Martyn so deeply are still preserved, fresh and vivid, a veritable classic in missionary literature.
The age of Schwartz, from a missionary point of view, has scarcely received adequate attention at the hand of the historian…

Page iii

Women’s Missionary Work in India and China

Cover: Glimpses of Women's Missionary Work in India and China.

Written shortly after the Jubilee of the Baptist Missionary Society (1867-1917), this book aims to provide a series of snapshots of the work done by female Baptist missionaries. It is illustrated by six photographic plates from India and China.

My thanks to Redcliffe College for providing a copy of this public domain title for digitisation.

George Hawker [1857-1932], Open the Window Eastward. Glimpses of Women’s Missionary Work in India and China. London: The Carey Press, [1917]. Hbk. pp.170. [Click to visit the download page for this title]

  • Preface
  1. Pioneers
  2. Zenana Echoes
  3. Zenana Schools
  4. Women’s Influence
  5. Village Itineration
  6. Boat-Tours in the Beels
  7. “Going-a-Plaguing”
  8. Famine Relief Work
  9. “Doctor Sahiba”
  10. An Industrial Settlement (Salamatpur)
  11. Education: Dehli, Entally and Ballygunge
  12. India: Review and Outlook
  13. Country Work in Shantung
  14. Bessie Campbell and Her Biographer
  15. Certain Women and their Stories
  16. In the Days of the Second Revolution
  17. The New Opportunity

Chapter 2: Zenana Echoes

When our missionary sisters entered the grudgingly opened doors of the zenanas, they were constrained, more markedly in some districts than in others, to make haste slowly. In a speech delivered in London in 1881, when the Mission was just fourteen years old, the Rev. R. F. Guyton described the evolution of zenana work proper in the city of Delhi, the scene of his own memorable labours. At first our sisters could attempt little more than the establishing of friendly relations by means of conversation on general topics. Later they were able to give lessons in reading, writing and secular subjects. Then they taught lace-work and other, feminine employments, which provided new interests and relieved the monotony of seclusion; and finally, when confidence had been secured and minds opened, they were able to introduce the Scriptures and urge the claims of Christ.

Mr. Guyton was of opinion that this policy of patience was entirely justified, and that more precipitate evangelism would have resulted in exclusion. Since that time zenana doors have been opening ever more swiftly and widely, and if the missionary staff were immensely increased, the members of it and their native assistants would find more than enough to do of actual gospel work.

In reading this address of Mr. Guyton’s, and relating it to other records, one is driven to reflect upon the appalling amount of inane and trivial talk which must have afflicted our women missionaries, taxing their patience to the point of exhaustion, in those early days, and, indeed, all the way along. Of course small talk is not peculiar to any race or to either sex, and if the conversation of the world were stenographed for a single day, and the, volume of it appraised by some commissioned angel of adequate endurance, it is gravely doubtful whether the talk of women would be adjudged to be vainer or more wearisome than that of men. That men think lightly of women’s matters is irrelevant. The angel critic, superior to masculine limitations and unbiased by masculine conceit, would weigh with equal scales….

Pages19-20.

Missions of the CMS and CEZMS in the Punjab and Sindh by Robert Clark

Robert Clark [1825-1900]

Robert Clark was one of the first two missionaries from the Church Missionary Society to arrive in the Punjab and founded the CMS mission station at Amrtisar, the CMS Afghan Mission in Peshawar and the Kashmir Mission. He was therefore well qualified to write this history of the work in the region. My thanks to the Cambridge Centre for Christianity Worldwide for making this public domain title available for digitisation.

Robert Clark [1825–1900], The Missions of the Church Missionary Society and the Church of England Zenana Missionary Society in the Punjab and Sindh. London: Church Missionary Society, 1904. Hbk. pp.280. [Click to visit the Robert Clark page for the download link for this title and others]

Contents

  • Prefatory Note
  1. Tthe Commencement of the Punjab Mission
  2. The Missionaries
  3. Statistics of the Society
  4. The Geographica; Position of the Mission Stations
  5. The People of the Punjab and Sindh
  6. The Creeds of the People of the Country
  7. Amritsar and its Institutions
  8. Batála
  9. Uddoké. The Story of the Late Rev. Pundit Khabak Singh
  10. Nárowál
  11. Anjála and Khutrain
  12. Bahrwál, Near Atárí
  13. The Tarán Táran Village Mission
  14. Jandiála
  15. The Clarkábád Agricultural Settlement
  16. Low Caste Converts and Apostasies
  17. Lahore
  18. Simla and Kotgarh
  19. Kangra
  20. Kashmír
  21. Pesháwar and Hazára
  22. The Deraját: Bannú, Dera Ismail Khán, and Tank
  23. The Belúch Mission
  24. Multán
  25. Quetta
  26. Karáachi
  27. Hyderabad
  28. Sukkur
  29. The Political Aspect of Missions
  30. Missions to Mohammedans
  31. Our Need of Chosen Agents
  32. Organisation
  33. Conclusion

Appendices

  1. Statistical Tables, 1873 to 1902
  2. Christian Literature Prepared by Members of the C.M.S. and the C.E.Z.M.S. in the Punjah and Sindh
  • Index

Lilian Mary Edward’s Work in India

Cover: Lilian Mary Edwards [1877-1945], A Welsh Woman's Work in India

Lilian Mary Edwards was the daughter of the Principal of the Baptist College in Cardiff. In this book she tells the story of her missionary service in India in order to encourage others in Wales [and beyond] to respond to the need there.

My thanks to Redcliffe College for making a copy of this public domain book available for digitisation.

Lilian Mary Edwards [1877-1945], A Welsh Woman’s Work in India. Caerphilly: Self-published, [1940]. Hbk. pp.98. [Click to visit the download page for this title]

Contents

  • Foreword
  1. The Call
  2. First Years in India
  3. Camping
  4. Zenana Visiting
  5. Women and Girls
  6. Festivals
  7. Temples
  8. Friends
  9. Daily Work in India
  10. Last Words

Chapter 1: The Call

In reviewing the lives of God’s children, we discover that they do not make their own lives, or choose their own paths. As Jeremiah writes, “It is not in man that walketh to direct his steps.” We assuredly know that our lives are in the hands of Another, and that they are intended to accomplish a purpose. We are to fit in with others “as stones fitly framed together groweth into a holy temple.” We cannot say with Henley the poet, in his “Invictus,” “I am master of my fate.”

My paternal grandfather would have rejoiced to know that his granddaughter had become a missionary. He was a farmer and monumental sculptor, living in a small village in Carmarthenshire. He kept himself well informed of missionary progress, by taking regularly the missionary magazine then issued. He not only kept himself well-informed but took care to impart the knowledge to others by reading the missionary news in the week-night meetings. In those days not everyone could read. He was so much venerated in that place that one is reminded of Job, as described “old men rose when they saw him, young men hid themselves and the princes refrained from speaking.” Not in his case the princes, but young men, if speaking or acting undesirably, saw my grandfather coming along, were heard to say in subdued tones, “Here’s John Edwards.” Prayer, inspired by the Holy Ghost, accomplishes God’s work. I became a missionary as the fulfilment of my mother’s prayer, realized twenty-five years after her death…

Page 1

Church of England Zenana Missions in India and Sri Lanka

A.D., Until the Shadows Flee Away. The Story of the C.E.Z.M.S. in India and Ceylon

The zenana missions were outreach programmes established in British India with the aim of converting women to Christianity. From the mid 19th century, they sent female missionaries into the homes of Indian women, including the private areas that male visitors were not allowed to see (zenana). Gradually these missions expanded from purely evangelical work to providing medical and education services. Hospitals and schools established by these missions are still active, making the zenana missions an important part of the history of Christianity in India.

“Zenana Missions”, Wikipedia

My thanks to the Cambridge Centre for Christianity Worldwide for making this public domain book available for digitisation.

A.D., Until the Shadows Flee Away. The Story of the C.E.Z.M.S. in India and Ceylon. London: Church of England Zenana Missionary Society, n.d. Hbk. pp.247. [Click to visit the download page for this title]

Contents

Part 1: Outlines and Impressions

  1. India and its Peoples
  2. India Past and Present
  3. Religions of India
  4. Condition of India and its Women
  5. India’s Women at the Crossing of the Way
  6. Folk-lore
  7. “Little Kings”
  8. The Church of England Zenana Missionary Society

Part 2: The Story of Work Amongst the Women of India and Ceylon

  1. The Border-Lnd and Over
  2. Through the Sindh to the Sea
  3. The Land of the Five Rivers
  4. The Plain of the Ganges
  5. The Central Provinces
  6. In the Telugu Country
  7. Madras and the Plateau of Mysore
  8. The Blue Mountains and the Lords of the Hills
  9. The Sacred Hedge
  10. The Land of the Conch Shell
  11. The Shining Land
  • Afterword—As the Stars
  • Appendices

Robben Island. Thirty-Four Years of Ministry Amongst the Lepers of South Africa

Cover: James Wescott Fish [1852-1937], Robben Island. An Account of Thirty-Four Years' Gospel Work Amongst Lepers of South Africa.

Robben Island, located in Table Bay, South Africa, was used from the 17th Century on as a prison, an animal quarantine station and, from 1845, a Leper Colony. In this book James Wescott Fish records his lifetime of service amongst the lepers there.

My thanks to Redcliffe College for making a copy fo this public domain title available for digitisation.

James Wescott Fish [1852-1937], Robben Island. An Account of Thirty-Four Years’ Gospel Work Amongst Lepers of South Africa. Kilmarnock: John Ritchie, 1924. Hbk. pp.210. [Click to visit the download page for this title]

Contents

  • Introduction
  1. Foreword
  2. The Early History of Robben Island (by G.F. Gresley)
  3. The History of Leprosy
  4. Thirty-Four Years’ Work Amongst the Lepers (by James W. Fish)
  5. A Never-to-be-Forgotten Day
  6. Gospel Tent Work in South Africa
  7. Our First Visit to Robben Island
  8. Eight Days with the Lepers
  9. The Love of Christ Constraineth
  10. Gospel Work among the Soldiers During the Boer War
  11. A Visit to Pondoland
  12. Back to Robben Island
  13. Trophies of Grace among the Lepers
  14. “Lonely Hearts to Cherish”
  15. A Terrible Scourge
  16. Visits to the Transvaal
  17. Visitors to the Island
  18. “Faith Healers” at Robben Island
  19. “One Soweth, Another Reapeth”
  20. Home Again to England

Chapter 2. The Early History of Robben Island

Probably but few of the residents on the sea coast of Cape Colony, give more than an occasional passing thought to the little barren-looking patch of land, situated at the month of Table Bay, known as Robben Island, or the Isle of Seals. It is, however, an object of much interest to those who arrive for the first time in South Africa by the mail steamers. For who can be unmoved on first hearing of the inhabitants who are inmates of its various institutions – the Law-breakers, the Lunatics, and the Lepers.

Few places probably, so small and insignificant-looking, can boast of having played so important a part in the history of a vast multitude of people, as can this little island in the rise, progress, and present welfare of the Cape Colony. I make no apology, therefore, in calling the attention of the readers of my narrative to the Island’s early history. And I claim for it more than a momentary passing attention. I ask for a respectful and reverential regard. And I assert that it has a right to such, for the pages of South African history tell of strange events here in the far-off past, and the existence of ancient ruins on the island, recently brought to light, speak of busy scenes, and many hands at work, in days long gone by.

Pages 10-11.