History of the Bible in China by Marshall Broomhall

Marshall Broomhall [1866-1937], The Bible in China

Marshall Broomhall provides a history of the translation of the forty versions of the Bible that were available in China by 1934. My thanks to Redcliffe College for providing a copy of this public domain title for digitisation.

Marshall Broomhall [1866-1937], The Bible in China. London: The China Inland Mission, 1934. Hbk. pp.190. [Click here to visit the download page]

Contents

  • Foreword
  • Our Obligations
  • By Way of Introduction

Part 1: The Bible in Preparation

  • Nestorian Pioneers
  • Under the Great Khans
  • In the Footsteps of Xavier
  • A New Force in Old China
  • Morrison and Marshman
  • The Delegates; Version
  • Gutzlaff and the Taiping Rebels
  • The People’s Bible
  • Unon Versions
  • Chinise Dialects
  • For the Tribes
  • The Scriptures in Manchu
  • Among the Mongols

Part 2: The Bible in Action

  • The Colporteur’s Task
  • The Colporteur’s Reward
  • Wise unto Salvation
  • The Power of the Word

Part 3: The Bible a Uniting Force

  • A Great Fellowship

Appendices

  • The Nestorian Tablet
  • List of Versions and Translations

Foreword

It is one hundred years since Robert Morrison died in China, and one hundred and twenty years since his Chinese translation of the New Testament was published. It is not unfitting that the centenary of Morrison’s death should see the remarkable story of the Bible in China published. It seems somewhat strange that this has not been done before. And now, by one of those unexpected coincidences which do occur, two records are being issued at the same time. On the very day on which we write this foreword-the whole book being finished-we have received from China a copy of the Rev. A. J. Garnier’s brochure of some eighty pages, entitled Chinese Versions of the Bible. Happily the two efforts do not clash.

Mr. Garnier’s concise pamphlet has been prepared, as his preface states, to be the basis of a Chinese Appendix to his translation of Professor G. Milligan’s The New Testament and its Transmission…

p.vii.

Centenary of the Baptist Missionary Society 1792-1892

John Brown Myers [1844/45-1915], editor, The Centenary Volume of the Baptist Missionary Society 1792-1892, 2nd edn.This is a detailed summary of the first hundred years of the Baptist Missionary Society with over 35 illustrations. These are included in greyscale to preserve their quality, which makes the download larger than usual. My thanks to Redcliffe College library for providing a copy of the book for digitisation. This volume is in the public domain.

John Brown Myers [1844/45-1915], editor, The Centenary Volume of the Baptist Missionary Society 1792-1892, 2nd edn. London: The Baptist Missionary Society, 1892. Hbk. pp.344. [Click to download complete book in PDF]

Contents

  • Holding the Ropes by Rev William John Henderson
  • India and Ceylon by Rev Samuel Vincent
  • China by Rev Ricahrd Glover
  • Africa by Rev Edward Medley
  • West Indies by Rev David Jonathan
  • East Europe by Rev William Landels
  • The Orissa Mission by Rev John Clifford
  • Bible Translation by Edward Bean Underhill
  • Appendix

Preface

The Committee of the Baptist Missionary Society publish this Volume on the hundredth anniversary of the existence of the Mission, with the prayerful hope that the perusal of these pages may excite fervent gratitude for past manifestations of Divine favour, and may lead to larger consecration, in view of the world-wide opportunities and urgent claims of the present day. If the century just closing furnishes, in the review of it, abundant occasion for encouragement, what will not the second century of modern missions, upon which we are now entering, witness, provided the Christian Church be faithful, expectant, and zealous l May every reader be prompted to inquire : “Lord, what wilt Thou have me to do?”

Whilst the occasion and scope of this publication do not permit the writers to make more than passing references to the work of kindred institutions, the Committee are not unmindful of the labours connected with other missions… [Continue reading]

William Carey Pioneer Missionary to India’s Millions

John Brown Myers [1844/45-1915], William Carey. The Shoemaker Who Became "The Father and Founder of Modern Missions"John Brown Myers [1844/45-1915] provides us with a brief biography of William Carey – “The Founder of Modern Missions”. The book includes chapters on Carey’s role as a translator, a philanthropist and a naturalist. My thanks to Redcliffe College for providing me with a copy to digitise. This book is in the public domain.

John Brown Myers [1844/45-1915], William Carey. The Shoemaker Who Became “The Father and Founder of Modern Missions”. Kilmarnock: John Ritchie, [1905]. Hbk. pp.151. [Click to download complete book in PDF]

Contents

Preface

  1. His Early Years
  2. His Life at Moulton and Leicester
  3. He Offers Himself as a Missionary, and Starts for India
  4. First Experiences
  5. Removal to Serampore
  6. The Serampore Mode of Life
  7. Three Important Events
  8. Various Circumstances
  9. Carey as a Translator
  10. Carey as a Philanthropist
  11. Carey as a Naturalist
  12. Carey and Serampore College
  13. Conclusion

Chapter 1: The Early Years

If Thomas Fuller, the author of the “Worthies of England,” himself a Northamptonshire man, had died a century after instead of exactly a century before William Carey was born, he might have written a work restricted to the worthies of his own county, and to those two hundred years, as voluminous and interesting as his well-known folio. From Dryden, whose birthplace, like his own, was the village of Aldwinkle, down to John Clare, who may be regarded as the English Robert Burns, how many celebrities, and that not alone of poet fame, would have received biographical notice! The dwellers in the midland shire may well be proud of the eminent men who have been born upon its soil. [Continue reading]

History of Bible Translations Up to 1939

R. Kilgour [1867-1942], The Bible Throughout the World. A Survey of Scripture TranslationsKilgour’s history of Bible translation was written to serve as a record of what had been achieved by the beginning of World War II. It  also indicated which people-groups were still waiting for a Bible in their own language. The volume contains numerous illustrative maps, which I have included in greyscale. My thanks to Redcliffe College for providing me with a copy of the book to scan.

R. Kilgour [1867-1942], The Bible Throughout the World. A Survey of Scripture Translations. London: World Dominion Press, 1939. Hbk. pp.208. [Download complete book in PDF]

Contents

  1. Early Versions of Scripture
  2. The Bible Throughout Europe
  3. The Bible Throughout Africa
  4. The Bible Throughout Asia
  5. The Bible Throughout America
  6. The Bible Throughout the Pacific Islands
  7. The Unfinished Task

Index

Maps

  1. Europe, Asia Minor, etc.
  2. Northern Africa
  3. Central and Southern Africa
  4. India and Burma
  5. Eastern Asia
  6. North and Central America
  7. South America
  8. Australia, etc.
  9. East Indian Archipelago

Introduction

This book has been prepared for the practical purpose of supplying information on the extent of Scripture translation, recording briefly what has been done, and, by inference, suggesting what remains to be accomplished. It does not necessarily follow, however, that Bible translation is needed for all the spaces unmarked on the language maps. Some are sparsely populated. In others there are often tribes speaking or. understanding some of the neighbouring languages or dialects in which Scriptures already exist. It has been estimated that, if they were able to read, at least nine-tenths of mankind are now supplied with some portion of God’s Word in a tongue they could understand.

This record could not have been compiled without the information so fully and reliably collected by my former colleagues, the late Rev. T. H. Darlow and Dr. H. F. Moule, in the Historical Catalogue of Printed Bibles issued in 1911 and now out of print. The accuracy and scholarship of this work become increasingly impressive the more one uses it. It gives details, not only of the books then in the Bible House Library, but of any others known to have been printed by any organization, a system also followed in this survey. [Continue reading]