Stories and Surveys of Missionary Enterprise in India

William C. Irvine [1871-1946], W, Redwood, A.C. Rose, W. Wilcox, eds., Indian Realities. Stories and Surveys of Missionary Enterprise in India by Workers from Assemblies in the Homelands

As the title suggests, this is an overview of missionary work in India published about 1937. It features a large number of black and white photographs. My thanks to Redcliffe College for making a copy of this public domain title available for digitisation.

William C. Irvine [1871-1946], W, Redwood, A.C. Rose, W. Wilcox, eds., Indian Realities. Stories and Surveys of Missionary Enterprise in India by Workers from Assemblies in the Homelands. Bangalore, India: The Scripture Literature Press, [1937]. Hbk. pp.210. [Click to visit the download page for this title]

Contents

  • Prologue
  • Introductory
  1. the Godavari District
  2. Pilgrim Preachers
  3. Bihar abd Northern India
  4. Hospital Work and Witness
  5. The Belguam District
  6. The Good News in Print
  7. The Kanarese Field
  8. No Mean Cities
  9. Shall the Prey be Taken from the Mighty
  10. The Lepers are Cleansed
  11. Travancore and Cochin
  12. Work Among Women
  13. In Tinnevelly
  14. Among the Children in School and Orphanage
  15. Pondocherry
  16. The Depressed Missions
  17. Our Indian Fellow-Workers
  18. Much Land to be Possessed
  19. Suggestions for Prospective Workers
  • Epilogue
  • Appendix I
  • Appendix II
  • Map of India

Indian Realities; of course the half cannot be told, either the dark or the bright, but we have gathered some of them into a bundle within the covers of this book. Our object is, frankly, to share them with you, who although you have so many of your own burdens to carry, cheerfully fulfil the law of Christ by shouldering your neighbours’.

Here is a grim village specimen, dated this year of grace 1937, September. “A report of a man being sacrificed to propitiate the Rain God in Gunpur village, near Hahan Thesil, Bombay Presidency, where drought is prevailing this year, has been re-ceived here. It is alleged that the victim was decoyed from another village. In chains, with his forehead smeared with ash and vermilion and with a garland round his neck, the man was paraded through the streets to the accompaniment of the beat of drums, and shortly after he was beheaded with a sharp axe before the village temple. The head was placed reverently by the villagers before the deity. On re-ceiving the news of the human sacrifice, the Police from the adjoining Tehsil arrived on the scene and seized the body and arrested twenty-five persons, in-cluding the headman of the village, the perpetrator of the crime, and the priest who officiated at the ceremony.” 

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Pearls of the Pacific: Samoa and Other Islands of the South Seas

Victor Arthur Barradale [1874-1947], Pearls of the Pacific. Being Sketches of Missionary Life and Work in Samoa and other Islands in the South Seas

Victor Arnold Barradale wrote two books that drew on his three years of missionary service in Samoa. Both had very similar titles. This is the earlier and more heavily illustrated of the two. My thanks to Redcliffe College for making a copy of this public domain title available for digitisation.

Victor Arthur Barradale [1874-1947], Pearls of the Pacific. Being Sketches of Missionary Life and Work in Samoa and other Islands in the South Seas. London: London Missionary Society, 1907. Hbk. pp.192. [Click to the Victor Barradale page where you will find the download links to his books]

Contents

  • Preface
  1. Samoa and Other Pearls
  2. The First Missionary Ships
  3. More Missionary Ships
  4. Samoa: As it Was
  5. Hoisting the Flag
  6. People, Houses and Food
  7. Play
  8. Climate, Clothing, Animals and Insects
  9. Seasons and Souls
  10. Trades and Employments
  11. Samoa: As it is—Home Life and Industries
  12. School Life
  13. The Malua Institution
  14. Churches
  15. Sunday Schools
  16. The Foreign Mission Work of the South Seas Churches
  17. More Foreign Missionary Work

Press Release: Operation Mobilisation Archive

Operation Mobilisation: Logos II

International missions archive to move to Leuven

On 19 October in Leuven, Belgium, Operation Mobilisation International (OM) will formally signify the transfer of the organisation’s records to EVADOC, Belgium’s archive for Protestantism and Evangelicalism. The archive will include sixty years of material which covers Bible smuggling into Soviet Russia, shipwreck, overland passage to India, mountain adventures in the Himalayas, and the growth of a movement estimated to have touched the lives of nearly one billion people worldwide. Linked with KADOC-KU Leuven, Catholic University of Leuven, Evadoc is a leading research unit in the history of evangelicalism and protestantism in the Low Countries. Evadoc’s first task will be to catalogue the materials. OM’s formal declaration of the transfer of its archives will take place at Evadoc’s 10 year anniversary Study and Meeting day, at the Evangelical Theological Faculty, Sint-Jansbergsesteenweg 95-97, 3001 Leuven, Belgium.
 
Aaldert Prins, spokesman for EVADOC, said today: “The OM archive is one of the greatest treasures of the modern protestant missionary movement. I am delighted that OM has chosen to entrust its records to EVADOC.”
 
George Verwer, founder of Operation Mobilisation, said today “Dr. Louis Palau said the story of OM is ‘one of the most thrilling, visionary, motivating stories in the history of Christian missions’. More than 100,000 young and older people have now served with this movement – often among the least reached peoples on earth. It’s their written reports and stories that have shaped OM’s legacy. That’s why today I’m thankful to EVADOC for this significant step we have taken together to conserve our history. As OM’s archives move to Leuven and become more widely available for historical missions research, my prayer is that many will be encouraged to believe God for even greater things than OM’s early pioneers could ever have imagined!” Dr. George Verwer, founder of Operation Mobilisation

OM was founded by three young students, still in their teens, in 1957, who took a Dodge truck full of Christian literature down to Mexico from Moody Bible Institute, Chicago. In 1960 the mission organisation, then called Send The Light (STL), began to work in Europe, opening a Christian book store in Spain despite religious restrictions imposed by General Franco. The pioneer workers went on to smuggle Bibles and Christian literature into Soviet Russia and Eastern Europe. Shortly afterwards the organisation was renamed Operation Mobilisation. During the 1960s, 1970s and 1980s, OM teams travelled overland from Zaventem, Belgium, to the Middle East, North Africa and the Indian sub-continent.
 
In 1971 OM launched its first ship, Logos. This was followed in 1977 by the Doulos, then the world’s oldest still operating passenger vessel and largest floating book-shop. In 1988 the Logos sank off the coast of Argentina, resulting in the dramatic rescue of all on board. Within a year, Logos was replaced with Logos II, and in 2009 Logos II was replaced by a much larger ship, Logos Hope. OM ships have visited 483 different ports in more than 150 countries around the world. 48 million visitors have come on board. 
 
From 1989 to 2001, OM’s Love Europe programme saw more than 30,000 young people travel to cities and rural areas ranging from Lisbon to Moscow and Oslo to Istanbul to share a message of hope and love through, music, art, dance, the printed word and intercultural contact.
 
OM Belgium celebrated its 50th anniversary in 2015 and OM international its 60th anniversary in 2017. EVADOC is therefore delighted to participate in conserving the heritage of this significant international mission organisation.
 
Further information on OM is available at www.om.org.

ENDS

For further media information and interviews, please contact Martin Turner, national director of OM, Belgium, at [email protected], or on +447753683337 (English, French and Dutch)

Notes for editors:

1 EVADOC vzw is the Protestant-Evangelical Archive and Documentation Centre for Belgium and works closely with KADOC-KU Leuven, Catholic University of Leuven.

2 Operation Mobilisation (OM) is an international Christian missions organisation, separately registered in the USA, UK, Germany, France, the Netherlands, Belgium, and most other countries in which it operates. In Belgium, OM is based at Fabrieksstraat 63, 1930 Zaventem, and registered as Operatie Mobilisatie vzw, Opération Mobilisation asbl.

General contact with OM in Belgium is be via [email protected]

Life of George Grenfell: Congo Missionary and Pioneer

https://missiology.org.uk/book_life-of-george-grenfell_hawker.php

This is a detailed and well-illustrated biography of the George Grenfell, pioneer missionary to the Congo. The endpiece is an extremely detailed map of Equatorial West Africa. My thanks to Redcliffe College for making a copy of this public domain title available for digitisation.

George Hawker [1857-1932], The Life of George Grenfell. London: The Religious Tract Society, 1909. pp.587. [Click to visit the George Grenfell page for this the download link to this title and other material on this missionary]

Contents

  • Introduction
  1. Early Years
  2. College Days
  3. At the Cameroons
  4. At the Cameroons (continued)
  5. Pioneering in the Lower Congo
  6. The Coming of the ‘Peace’
  7. The Coming of the ‘Peace’ (continued)
  8. Boat Journey to the Equator
  9. The First Voyage of the ‘Peace’
  10. From Autumn, 1884, to Autumn, 1887
  11. From Autumn, 1884, to Autumn, 1887 (continued)
  12. Forward Movements on the Upper River
  13. The Seizure of the ‘Peace’ and the Coming of the ‘Goodwill’
  14. The Lunda Expedition
  15. Bolobo and Yakusu—1893 to 1896
  16. Missions and Social Results
  17. ‘In Journeyings Often’
  18. Up the Aruwimi
  19. Illness and Last Furlough
  20. Letters to His Children
  21. Balked by the State
  22. To Yalemba at Last!
  23. ‘The Death of “Tata” Finished’

Introduction

When I was requested by the Committee of the Baptist Missionary Society to write the biography of my friend and former fellow-student, George Grenfell, it was stipulated that the volume should contain a section of about a hundred pages to be contributed by an expert (Sir Harry Johnston, if possible), in which the scientific side of Grenfell’s work should be duly discussed and appraised. Subsequently, Sir Harry Johnston· consented to undertake this task. But when Grenfell’s papers and journals came to hand, it was apparent that two or three chapters included in a general biography would be quite inadequate for the worthy treatment of Grenfell’s scientific achievements. It was therefore arranged that Sir Harry Johnston should write a separate ,vork, an arrangement in which I cordially concurred.
That work has been published under the title George Grenfell and the Congo, and has secured the high encomiums of competent critics…

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Visit to All Nations Christian College

Visit to All Nations Christian College 1

Yesterday I had another chance to visit All Nations Christian College in Hertfordshire. Easneye Mansion was formerly the country home of the Buxton Family, and was designed the same architect as the National History Museum in Kensington. It now houses the largest specialist missiological library in Europe, with over 50,000 books and several hundred journals, some of which are very rare. Set within the grounds of a wooded estate it looks like a wonderful place to prepare for missionary work.

With more and more students wanting to study remotely the challenge the College faces is to make as many of the resources in the library as possible available online – which was the reason for my being invited. My thanks to the faculty and support staff for making this such a worthwhile visit.

You can read my interview with Dr Mark Galpin, All Nation’s head of postgraduate studies, here.

Christian Missions and Social Progress: A Sociology of Missions

James S. Dennis [1842-1914], Christian Missions and Social Progress. A Sociological Study of Foreign Missions, 3 Vols.

James S. Dennis’s seven Lectures on the Sociology of Christian Mission are notable for both their detail (they run to 1,629 pages!) and the huge number of photographs included in each volume. This presented some difficulties for digitisation and the file sizes of the downloads and larger than usual as a result.

My thanks to Redcliffe College for providing a set of these public domain books for digitisation.

James S. Dennis [1842-1914], Christian Missions and Social Progress. A Sociological Study of Foreign Missions, 3 Vols. Edinburgh & London: Oliphant Anderson & Ferrier, 1899. Hbk. pp.468+486+675. [Click here to visit the download page for these volumes]

Contents

Volume 1

  • Lecture 1: The Sociological Scope of Christian Missions
  • Lecture 2: The Social Evils of the Non-Christian World
  • Lecture 3: Ineffectual Remedies and the Causes of Their Failure
  • Lecture 4: Christianity the Social Hope of the Nations

Volume 2

  • Lecture 5: The Dawn of a Sociological Era in Missions
  • Lecture 6: The Contribution of Christian Missions toi Social Progress

Volume 3

  • Lecture 6: The Contribution of Christian Missions to Social Progress (continued)

Preface to Volume 1

The Students’ Lectures on Missions at Princeton Theological Seminary, which form the basis of the book now issued, were delivered by the author in the spring of 1896. The subject treated-” The Sociological Aspects of Foreign Missions “- was suggested to him by the students themselves, especially by members of the Sociological Institute and of the Missionary Society of the Seminary, with the special request that it be chosen for consideration. It has proved an absorbing and fruitful theme. The interest which it elicited was shown by requests from the faculties of Auburn, Lane, and Western Theological Seminaries to have the course repeated at those institutions after its delivery at Princeton. The lectures were limited to an hour each, but in preparing them for publication they have been recast, for the most part rewritten, and greatly expanded. This is especially true of the second lecture, and will be so in the case of the sixth, which will appear in the second volume…

p.vii

Robert and Louisa Stewart in Life and Death

Mary E. Watson, Robert and Louisa Watson. In Life and Death

Robert and Louisa Stewart were both born in ireland and served with the Church Missionary Society in China, where they died in the Kucheng Massacre of 1895. This book was written by Louisa’s sister and is the standard biography of the couple.

My thanks to Redcliffe College for making this public domain title available for digitisation.

Mary E. Watson, Robert and Louisa Watson. In Life and Death. London: Marshall Brothers, 1895. Hbk. pp.243. [This title is in the public domain]

Contents

  • Preface
  1. Some Reminiscences of Robert Stewart
  2. Ambassadors For Christ
  3. The Whirlwind
  4. The Joyful Sound
  5. Native Boys and Girls at School
  6. Christ Magnified
  7. “Possessions”
  8. Hands Clasped
  9. Strong Consolation
  10. “Called, and Chosen, and Faithful

Chapter 2

Various proposals have been made as to writing a Life of Robert and Louisa Stewart ; but they have all been declined.

Lives so truly lived in secret with God are not easy to record. And even if the attempt were successfully made, is there not a danger of exalting the human and losing sight of the fact that “all things are of God?”

It has been thought, therefore, that it is sufficient for God’s glory, to print some letters lately received, and supply a few details of the earlier times. Their letters were not kept, at Mr. Stewart’s earnest request.

Feeling that anything too personal would have been repugnant to the feelings of our dear brother and sister, we refrain from writing their biographies; but we know their wish would be that we should write and print anything that would awaken love and sympathy for China and the Chinese-anything that would show the friends who have helped through prayer and by their gifts that the need now is not less, but greater….

Pages 17-18.

Leprosy Mission in India, Japan & China

John Jackson [1853-1917], In Leper-Land. A Record of 7,000 Miles among Indian Lepers, with a Glimpse of Hawaii, Japan, and China

This is John Jackson’s record of his 7,000 mile tour (in about 1900) through India, China and Japan on behalf of the Mission to Lepers, now The Leprosy Mission.

My thanks to Redcliffe College for providing a copy of this public domain book for digitisation.

John Jackson [1853-1917], In Leper-Land. A Record of 7,000 Miles among Indian Lepers, with a Glimpse of Hawaii, Japan, and China. London: The Mission to Lepers, [1914]. Hbk. pp.208. [Click here to visit The Leprosy Mission page for the download link for this book and related titles]

Contents

  1. Bombay
  2. Pui and Poladur
  3. Nasik
  4. Wardha and Raipur
  5. Chandkuri
  6. Mungeli
  7. Purulia
  8. Purulia (continued)
  9. Asansol
  10. Raniganj and Bhangalpur
  11. Calcutta
  12. The Cry of the Children
  13. An Indian Snowstorm
  14. Almora
  15. Almora to Chandag
  16. Chandag Heights—The Place
  17. Chandag Heights—The Worker
  18. Chandag Heights—The Work
  19. Moradabad, Rurki, and Dehra Dun
  20. Saharanpur, Ludhiana, ad Ambala
  21. Tarn Taran
  22. Ramachandrapuram
  23. Sholapur, Poona, and Miraj
  24. A World Tour

Chapter 1

This volume is the record of a Tour extending to 7,000 miles of Indian travel and occupying a period of twenty weeks, exclusive of the voyages out and home. My primary purpose was to ascertain by personal observation the real condition of the lepers of India, and to obtain a direct insight into the work of ministering to their physical and spiritual needs. It was fitting, therefore, that my first visit to any place of public interest should be to the ” Homeless Leper Asylum,” as it is officially termed, at Matunga, Bombay. The drive of five miles through the city presented to my unfamiliar gaze more features of interest than one pair of eyes could apprehend. While trying to seize the points of a group full of life and colour on the right, figures and scenes of beauty or squalor, but picturesque in either case, were escaping me on the left….

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Oxford Centre for Mission Studies Library

SS Philip and James Parish Church
SS Philip and James Parish Church. Source: OCMS Website.

This morning I took a short break from the BETH Conference to visit the Oxford Centre for Mission Studies, which is only 5 minutes walk from Wycliffe Hall in the former St Philips and St James Church on Woodstock Road. The Centre has a library of over 18,000 missions books and journals, which focuses “… on the Two-Thirds World (Africa, Asia, Oceania, Latin America) and cover both the Humanities (Theology, Biblical studies, Religious studies) and the Social Sciences (Anthropology, International Development, Diaspora/Refugee Studies, Research Methods).” [Source]

Library of the Oxford Centre for Mission Studies,taken from the upper gallery
Library of the Oxford Centre for Mission Studies,taken from the upper gallery

Despite the size of the church it is crammed with bookcases, which surround the study carrels.

Library of the Oxford Centre for Mission Studies,taken from the upper gallery
Library of the Oxford Centre for Mission Studies,taken from the upper gallery
Library of the Oxford Centre for Mission Studies
Library of the Oxford Centre for Mission Studies
Library of the Oxford Centre for Mission Studies
Library of the Oxford Centre for Mission Studies

If you are a serious student of Christian Missions then this library should certainly be on your list of places to visit.

From Japan to Jerusalem by Bishop Graham Ingram

E. Graham Ingram [1851-1926], From Japan to Jerusalem

Graham Ingram, the former bishop of Sierra Leone, was the Home Secretary on the Church Mission Society. In this book he records his eight months of travel during 1909-1910 to CMS mission stations across Japan, China, Israel anf Egypt.

A copy of this handsome and well illustrated public domain volume was kindly provided by Redcliffe College for digtisation.

E. Graham Ingram [1851-1926], From Japan to Jerusalem. London: Church Missionary Society, 1911. Hbk. pp.232. [Click to visit the download page for this title]

Contents

  • Introductory
  1. The First Stage
  2. On the Siberian Railway
  3. A Foreword on Japan
  4. In Japan—Osaka
  5. In Japan—Nara, Tokushima and Kyoto
  6. In Japan—The Hokkaido
  7. In Japan—Tokyo, Hiroshima, etc.
  8. In Japan—Kiu-Shiu
  9. A Foreword on China
  10. In China—Shanghai, Hang-chow and Shaou-hing
  11. In China—Ningpo and T’ai-chow
  12. In China—At Shanghai Again
  13. In China—Fuh-Kien Province
  14. In China—Fuh-Kien Province (continued)
  15. In China—Canton
  16. In China—Kong Kong
  17. A Foreword on India and Ceylon
  18. Ceylon
  19. In India—Tinnevelly
  20. In India—Madras, Calcutta and Nadiya
  21. In India—Benares and Allahabad
  22. In India—Lucknow, Cawmpore, Agra, Dehli and Peshawar
  23. In India—Lahore, Amritsar, Tarn Taran and Batala
  24. In India—Meerut, Nasik and Bombay
  25. A Foreword on Palestine and Egypt
  26. In the Holy Land—Jaffa and Jerusalem
  27. In the Holy Land—Nazareth and Lake of Galilee
  28. In Egypt—A Week in Cairo
  • Conclusion

Introductory

The story of eight months of 1909-10 spent on the frontiers of Christendom is now sent forth for general information. It is the story of a soldier spared for a short time from his base of operations to see how the battle fared at the front and to encourage the fighting line. The importance of this record arises from more reasons than one.

A great many people are now travelling. They are found on all the great roads–north and south and east and west. They see what they go to see. Many of them, like the present writer, feel it to be their plain duty to write a book on their return! The reader must judge as to whether the ordinary globe-trotter has met with phenomena such as the following pages show forth. Travellers are very much at the mercy of their guide books….

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