John Hunt Pioneer Missionary to Fiji

John Hunt [1811-1848] was a Methodist missionary to Fiji.

Hunt arrived in Fiji with his wife in 1839… His main task with Bible translation; he completed the New Testament and had begun the work on translating the Old Testament before his untimely death from dysentery. He was a person of deep religious feeling whose beauty of character and total devotion made a strong impact on the Fijians, even when they did not accept his faith. He respected the Fijian culture and learned to know it well, recognizing both its bad and good qualities. He worked to develop forms of worship that made use of Fijian cultural styles. [Biographical Dictionary of Christian Missions, p.311]

My thanks to Redcliffe College for providing a copy of this book for scanning. This title is in the public domain.

Joseph Nettleton [1835-1914], John Hunt. Pioneer Missionary and Saint. London: Charles H. Kelly, [1906]. Hbk. pp.124. [Click to download the complete book in PDF]

Contents

  1. “In the Days of Thy Youth”
  2. The Ernest Student and Missionary-Designate
  3. First Impressions of Fiji and the Fijians
  4. The Translator-in-Chief of the Holy Scriptures
  5. Somosomo; or, Reasonable Expectation Disappointed
  6. Viwa: Revivals and Native Pastors
  7. Entire Sanctification
  8. “In Journeyings Oft”
  9. Early and Triumphant Death
  10. Testimonies to Character and Usefulness

Preface

I count it a great honour to have been requested to write the life of John Hunt for the ‘Library of Missionary Biography.’ I entered into his labours, and was a debtor to him as a pioneer. I landed first on Viwa after leaving England in 1860, and went straight from the ship’s boat to his grave. There under the palm-trees, on bended knees, I consecrated myself to carry on the work which he commenced with so much heroism and devotion. I used the textbooks in the college for training native pastors which he had prepared. The aromatic saintliness of his life fell like a benediction upon me. I was a better man, and more efficient as a missionary, for the influence of his life and the inspiration of his work. [Continue reading]

 

 

John Smith Martyr-Teacher to the Slaves of Demerara

David Chamberlin [1870-1944], Smith of Demerara (Martyr-Teacher of the Slaves)John Smith [1790-1824] served with the London Missionary Society in Guyana (then British Guyana).

In August 1823 a slave revolt broke out, and Smith, whose sympathies with the slaves were well known, was accused of aiding and assisting the rebellion. He was tried, convicted, and sentenced to death. His sentence was remitted, but he died in prison before word reached the colony. Smith was the only missionary who could be said to have been martyred by the West Indian Plantocracy. [Biographical Dictionary of Christian Missions, p.627.]

My thanks to Redcliffe College for providing a copy of this book for digitisation. This title is in the public domain.

David Chamberlin [1870-1944], Smith of Demerara (Martyr-Teacher of the Slaves). London: Colonial Missionary Society, 1923. Pbk. pp.112. [Click to download the complete book in PDF]

Contents

  • Preface
  • Introduction
  1. John Smith
  2. Life on the Plantations
  3. The Perseverance of “The Saints”
  4. The Rising
  5. The Rising Suppressed
  6. The Court Martial
  7. From the Court to the Grave
  8. In the House of Commons
  • Appendix – British Guyana
  • Chronology

Introduction

The Slaver, the Gold-seeker and the Pirate have stamped the brand of infamy upon the story of the Spanish Main. But, in the very days when the Atlantic was being reddened by the worst atrocities of the traffic in human beings, a brief drama. of another kind was wrought out in Demerara. A plain and humble man, with dogged integrity, was making a great fight for the right to give instruction to the plantation slaves. His battle ended in seeming failure, but he won the war, – and Time, the great teacher of perspective, has placed the name of John Smith on the world’s Roll of Honour. [Continue reading]

London Missionary Society – Gleanings From Many Lands

George Cousins [1842-?], Gleanings From Many Fields, 3rd edn.This book represents a summary of the achievements of the London Missionary Society over 100 years since its foundation. It is drawn from accounts of its workers across the all the countries that the L.M.S. had worked in. There are fifty illustrations in this volume. My thanks to Redcliffe College for providing me with a copy of the book to scan. This title is in the public domain.

George Cousins [1842-?], Gleanings From Many Fields, 3rd edn. London: London Missionary Society, 1896. Hbk. pp.216. [Click to download complete book in PDF]

Contents

  • Preface
  1. Natives and Native Ways
  2. Cruel Customs That Christ is Conquering
  3. Child Life and Amusements
  4. Stories of Wild Beasts
  5. Perils by Land and Water
  6. In the Land of Idols
  7. Progress in “The Middle Kingdom”
  8. Light in the Great Dark Continent
  9. Madagascar and the Malagasy
  10. Isles of the Southern Ocean
  11. Rescuing the Negroes of the West Indies
  12. Faithful Unto Death
  13. Native Workers For Christ
  14. Schools and Scholars
  15. Among the Sick and Suffering
  16. Women to the Rescue

Chapter 1: Natives and Native Ways

The South Sea Islanders, like many of their more civilized fellow-creatures, are very fond of feasting. They believe m p1es and puddings quite as much as. you do, and not only at Christmas time, but at all seasons of the year. Theirs, however, are much larger than yours. Fancy a pie ten or twelve feet round! And a roly-poly three hundred feet long, and about as thick as a man’s body! You could not eat many of those Christmas pies, or many slices of those puddings, I am sure! It would not be a very easy matter to make and cook such large pies and puddings in England, but the natives find no difficulty in making or eating them. To make the puddings, they simply dig a trench, fill it with wood, upon which they place stones. [Continue reading]

Samuel Hebich of India – Master Fisher of Men

George S. Thomssen 1855-1921], Hebich of India. Master Fisher of MenGerman missionary Samuel Hebich [1803-1868] served for 25 years as leader of the Basel Mission in southwest India. His entry in the Biographical Dictionary of Christian Missions notes in part:

Hebich was exceptionally successful in the conversion of young British officers, although his autocratic inclinations made him a difficult person to work with. His rather oversimplified revivalist preaching and his uncompromising fight against Hindu “paganism” aroused considerable criticism in India and Europe… Still, when Hebich retired after 25 years of service, a solid foundation had been laid on which an Indian church could be built. [p.286]

My thanks to Redcliffe College for providing a copy of this book for digitisation. This title is in the public domain.

George S. Thomssen 1855-1921], Hebich of India. Master Fisher of Men, 2nd edn. Mangalore, India: Basel Mission Book & Tract Depository. 1915. Hbk. pp.315. [Click to download complete book in PDF]

Contents

  1. The Successful Fisher of Men
  2. Hebich pays the Price
  3. Preparing for Life’s Work
  4. Establishing the Basal Mission in India
  5. Mission Work and Worry
  6. Work Begun among Europeans
  7. One Door Shut, Another Opened
  8. The Work of the Lord in Cannamore
  9. A New Departure in Missions
  10. Hebich and His Fellow-Missionaries
  11. Native Assistants
  12. Life in the Mission Compound
  13. Work at Heathen Festivals
  14. European Assistants
  15. A Remarkable Revival
  16. Work Old and New
  17. A Worthy Son
  18. When Greek Meets Greek
  19. Lengthening the Cords
  20. Hebich’s Own
  21. Fire
  22. On Tour
  23. Storm and Stress
  24. Last Work in India
  25. Eight More Years at Home
  • Appendix: A Letter from General J.G. Halliday

History of the Melanesian Mission

Eliza Suzanna Armstrong [1836-1908], The History of the Melanesian MissionEliza Susanna Armstrong provides a detailed history of the Melanesian Mission from 1841 to 1899. This region includes what is today Papua New Guinea, Fiji, Vanuatu and the Solomon Islands. My thanks to Redcliffe College for providing a copy of this book for digitisation. This title is in the public domain.

Eliza Suzanna Armstrong [1836-1908], The History of the Melanesian Mission. London: Isbister & Co. Ltd., 1900. Hbk. pp.372. [Download complete book in PDF]

Contents

Part 1

  1. 1841-48. The Melanesian Mission
  2. 1849-52. The Australian Board of Missions
  3. 1853-56. John Coleridge Patteson
  4. 1857-58. Winter School at Lifu
  5. 1858-61. Consecration of John Coleridge Patteson

Part 2

  1. 1861-62. Establishment at Mota
  2. 1863. Peril and Success
  3. 1863-64. In the Australian Colonies
  4. 1864. Deaths of Edwin Nobbs and Fisher Young
  5. 1865-66. The Tree Forts

Part 3

  1. 1867. S. Barnabas, Norfolk Island
  2. 1868-69. The Labour Trade in Melanesia
  3. 1870. Internal Management of Mission
  4. 1871.
  5. The Bishop’s Last Journey

Part 4

  1. 1871-72. Mr. Codrington as Head of the Mission
  2. 1873. The First Melanesian Priest
  3. 1874. The New Southern Cross
  4. 1875. Mr. Codrington in the Islands
  5. 1876. Mr. Selwyn’s Tour
  6. 1871. The Consecration of John Richardson Selwyn

Part 5

  1. 1877. The Way Open to Santa Cruz
  2. 1878. In the Santa Cruz Islands
  3. 1879. Teachers’ Meeting at Mota – Census
  4. 1880. Consecration of S. Barnabas
  5. 1881. Justice Done in the Floridas
  6. 1882. Ordination of Charles Sapibuana
  7. 1883. Great Advance in Florida
  8. 1884. Memorial Cross at Nukapu
  9. 1885. Clement Marau at Ulawa
  10. 1886. Mrs. J. Selwyn’s Visit to the Islands
  11. 1887. Retirement of Dr. Codrington
  12. 1888. The Parliament of the Floridas
  13. 1889. The Baptism of Soga
  14. 1890. Serious Illness of the Bishop
  15. 1891. The Bishop Leaves for England – His Resignation
  16. 1892. Visit of the Bishop of Tasmania
  17. 1893. British Protectorate in the Solomons

Part 6

  1. 1894. The Consecration of the Cecil Wilson
  2. 1895. S. Luke’s, Siota
  3. 1896. Women’s Work in the Mission
  4. 1897. Difficulties in Queensland
  5. 1898. Death of Bishop John Selwyn
  6. 1899. The Jubilee of the Mission

 

William Carey: A Biography (1853)

Joseph Belcher, William Carey: A Biography.Joseph Belcher’s 1853 biography of William Carey was intended to be a more attractive, concise and readable work than that produced by Carey’s nephew, the Rev Eustace Carey. The latter work, the first biography of this subject, was regarded as heavy going, even by the standards of the day. My thanks to Redcliffe College for providing me with a copy of the book for digitisation. This title is in the public domain.

Joseph Belcher, William Carey: A Biography. Philadelphia: American Baptist Publication Society, 1853. Hbk. pp.306. [Click to download complete volume in PDF]

Preface

The question may, probably, be asked by some who take up this volume, Why publish a new life of a man who has been dead nearly twenty years? And especially, when a former Memoir, written by an able ex-missionary, a near relative of its subject, and personally acquainted with him, has been extensively circulated? Allow me, gentle reader, to write a few words in reply.

WILLIAM CAREY is one of the names which no section of the Christian church will ever permit to die. The pioneer, of modern missionaries, he strikingly illustrates the grace of God in his own personal history, and shows us the kind of agency which God usually employs in accomplishing the designs of his mercy to our fallen world. His example presents great encouragement to Christians of every class to labor for God, while it exhibits the spirit. and temper in which all services for the highest interests of the world must be accomplished. The life of CAREY will always be kept before the church of Christ; and no objection to two biographies of this extraordinary man can be made, so long as we have more than one of the illustrious MILTON, of the never-dying BUNYAN, of the zealous WHITEFIELD, or of the immortal WASHINGTON. [Continue reading]

Three Closed Lands: China, Bhutan and Nepal

John Anderson Graham [1861-1942], On the Threshold of Three Closed Lands. The Guild Outpost in the Western Himalayas
The “Three Closed Lands” are China, Bhutan & Nepal
This is an account of the Eastern Himalayan Mission of the Church of Scotland written in 1897. It was located near the borders of three countries which foreign missionaries were not allowed to enter – China, Bhutan and Nepal. Its 178 pages contain no less than 132 illustrations!

My thanks to Redcliffe College for providing me with a copy to digitise. This title is in the public domain.

John Anderson Graham [1861-1942], On the Threshold of Three Closed Lands. The Guild Outpost in the Western Himalayas, 2nd edn. Edinburgh: R & R Clark, Ltd. / London: A & C Black, 1897. Pbk. pp.178. [Click to download complete book in PDF]

Contents

  • Preface to Second Edition
  • Introduction
  1. The Way Thither
  2. From the Church Tower
  3. The Village
  4. God’s Acre
  5. The Memorial Church
  6. The Ministry of Healing
  7. Teaching
  8. The Hill Crofters
  9. Among the Tea Gardens
  10. A Himalayan Parish
  11. The Care of the Churches
  12. Handing the Torch
  13. Holding the Ropes
  14. The St. Andrew’s Colonial Homes

Introduction

This brightly written account of one of the most interesting and prosperous Missions in India needs no introduction for the benefit of those for whom it is principally intended-the members of the Congregations, Associations, Branches, and Guilds scattered through-out the country, who are already acquainted with the work, who perhaps already support it with their contributions, or have helped to send out some of the workers, and whose warmer interest and more active assistance will be called out by a perusal of this vivid narrative.  [Continue reading]

Story of the London Missionary Society in the South Seas

George Cousins [1842-?], The Story of the South SeasThe work of the London Missionary Society in the Pacific Ocean through its “Missionary Ships” is truly inspiring. In this heavily illustrated book George Cousins (editorial Assistant and Assistant Foreign Secretary of the London Missionary Society) draws on a number of sources to retell the story. My thanks to Redcliffe College for providing a copy of the book for scanning. This title is in the public domain.

George Cousins [1842-?], The Story of the South Seas. London: London Missionary Society, 1894. Hbk. pp.246. [Click to download complete book in PDF]

Contents

  1. The Good Ship “Duff” and Her Strange Cargo
  2. “The Night of Toil”
  3. The Overthrow of Idolatry
  4. Spreading Out
  5. Carrying the Light to Other Groups
  6. The “Messenger of Peace” and Her Useful Work
  7. The Martyred Missionary Polynesia
  8. Further Extension
  9. Teaching and Training Heathen Converts
  10. Joining Hands to Save New Guinea
  11. Summing Up, or Work and Workers in the Older Stations
  12. Other Labourers in the Southern Ocean

Preface

This book is the outcome of the revived interest in the South Seas which the effort to build the steamer John William’s has created. In reading old books descriptive of the early days of the mission I came across so many striking facts unknown to the present generation that a desire to put these facts together in a short connected story grew strong within me.

The first few pages repeat what appears in the opening chapter of “From Island to Island,” but in an altered form. The remainder is newly written. The books to which I am specially indebted are: Ellis’s “Polynesian Researches,” Williams’s “Missionary Enterprises,” Buzacott’s “Mission Life in the Pacific,” Turner’s” Nineteen Years in Polynesia,” Murray’s” Western Polynesia,” and” Forty Years’ Mission Work,” Gill’s “Gems from the Coral Islands,” Dr. Steele’s “New Hebrides and Christian Missions,” “The Night of Toil,” by the author of the “Peep of Day,” and an article entitled “Christian Work in Polynesia,” which appeared in” The Missionary Review of the World. [Continue reading]

Fifty Years in China with Griffith John

R. Wardlaw Thompson [1842-1916], Griffith John. The Story of Fifty Years in ChinaThis is R. Wardlaw Thompson’s [1842-1916] detailed account of Griffith John’s fifty years of service in China with the London Missionary Society. My thanks to Redcliffe College for providing a copy of the book for digitisation. This title is in the public domain.

R. Wardlaw Thompson [1842-1916], Griffith John. The Story of Fifty Years in China. London: The Religious Tract Society, 1908. Hbk. pp.552. [Download complete book in PDF]

This book contains a superb contemporary map of China. Click on the map below for a larger image.

Map of China

Contents

  • Preface
  1. Early Life and Training for Ministry
  2. The Great Decision and the Open Door
  3. Shanghai
  4. In Journeyings Oft
  5. The T’Ai-P-ing Rebels
  6. Hankow at Last
  7. The Power of the Preacher
  8. Development and Extension
  9. Yet Further Afield
  10. In Defence of Missions
  11. The First Furlough
  12. Growing Work and Widening Influence
  13. Evangelising by the Pen – Colportage
  14. Hiau-Kan
  15. Home Again
  16. Sorrow – Anxiety – Honour
  17. Translating the Scriptures
  18. Years of Excitement and Change
  19. Hunan
  20. New Movements and the Old Missionary
  • Index

Chapter 1. Early Life and Training For the Ministry

The life of a great missionary, who has spent many years and endured many perils in the prosecution of his great enterprise, who has become known and honoured in many circles beyond the Society with which he is most immediately connected, whose voice has been listened to and whose judgment has been respected by native leaders and British officials, cannot fail to present abundant material for interesting and profitable study. The story of his work, the expression of his opinions, the observation of his character, and the principles which have ruled his life are all of value.

To this has to be added, in the case of Griffith John, all the interest arising from the fact that he has spent the past fifty years in China. [Continue reading]

Zenana Missions Work Fuh-Kien Province, China

Mary Elizabeth Darley [c.1870-1934], The Light of the Morning. The Story of the C.E.Z.M.S. Work in the Kien-Ning Prefecture of the Fuh-Kien Province China.This is the fascinating account of the Zenana mission work of Mary Elizabeth Darley [c.1870-1934]. She served in China with the Church of England Zenana Mission Society and was supported by the Ladies’ Auxiliary of the Dublin University Fuh-Kien Mission. My thanks to Redcliffe College for providing a copy of the book to scan. This title is in the public domain.

Mary Elizabeth Darley [c.1870-1934], The Light of the Morning. The Story of the C.E.Z.M.S. Work in the Kien-Ning Prefecture of the Fuh-Kien Province China. London: Church of England Zenana Missionary Society / Marshall Brothers, 1903. Hbk. pp.251. [Download complete book in PDF]

Contents

  • Introduction
  1. First Impressions
  2. Some Village Christians
  3. The Story of Golden Sister
  4. The “Ten-Commandments Inn” Woman
  5. Summer Sketches
  6. “They are Waiting Everywhere!”
  7. An Itinerating Tour
  8. A Strange Experience
  9. Shadows Steal Across the Sky
  10. Clouds Cover the Blue
  11. “He Maketh the Storm to Cease!”
  12. A Leper, and Blind
  13. A Station Class
  14. Fields Already White
  15. Binding the Sheaves
  16. Toil and Sure Reward

One story that caught my wife’s eye as she was looking through this book was the ministry among Buddhist “prayer-women” and the account of the conversion of one of them at the age of 75.

Extract from p.141 onwards

“We have lately come in close contact with old Mrs. Ho, who for the last thirty years has been busily engaged in prayer-chanting. In the third month of last year she came to our house amongst a crowd of forty or fifty other women a tidy, clean old lady, seventy-five years old, very small, and well-behaved. I gave her tea, and she stroked my hand, and said, ‘ I cannot understand what you say with so many visitors here; may I wait till they are gone, and then you can slowly tell me about your religion?’

“Willingly I asked her to wait, and for five hours that old lady sat eagerly listening to what I was saying, and trying to understand. When the rush of visitors was over, I was able to talk to her alone for some time. She was very much interested, and, I think, was convicted of the truth on that first Sunday.

“Every week she came regularly to Church, and we could tell that a real work was going on in her heart. Then a difficulty arose. She was receiving payment for prayers she was saying for several families, and had been prepaid for the next three months. As this payment had been paid in kind, and not in cash, she did not know what to do. [Continue reading]

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