Protestant Missions in South America to 1900

Harlan P. Beach, F.P.L. Josa, J. Taylor Hamilton, H.C. Tucker, C.W. Drees, I.H. La Fetra, T.B. Wood & T.S. Pond, Protestant Missions in South America
Endpiece: Missionary Map of South America. Click image to download larger version

This college textbook covers the progress of Protestant Missions up to 1900 in most of the countries of South America. It also includes a superb colour map as an endpiece. My thanks to Redcliffe College for providing me with a copy if the book to scan. This title is in the public domain.

Harlan P. Beach, F.P.L. Josa, J. Taylor Hamilton, H.C. Tucker, C.W. Drees, I.H. La Fetra, T.B. Wood & T.S. Pond, Protestant Missions in South America. New York: Student Volunteer Movement, 1907. Hbk. pp.239. [Click to download complete book in PDF]

Contents

Preface

  1. Geographical and General. By Harlan P. Beach
  2. British Guiana. By Canon F.P.L. Josa
  3. Dutch Guiana, or Surinam. By Prof. J. Taylor Hamilton
  4. Brazil. By H.C. Tucker
  5. Republics of the Plata River. By Rev. C.W. Drees
  6. Chile. By Rev. I.H. La Fetra
  7. The Land of the Incas. By Rev. T.B. Wood
  8. Colombia. By Mrs T.S. Pond
  9. Veneszuela. By Mrs. T.S. Pond
  10. South America as a Mission Field. By Rev. T.B. Wood
  • Appendix A. – Bibliography
  • Appendix B. – General Statistics concerning South American Countries
  • Appendix C. – South American Missionary Statistics for 1900.
  • Analytical Index
  • Map Index
  • Missionary Map of South America

Preface

This text-book is one of a series, prepared primarily for the use of mission study classes in colleges and other institutions of higher learning, but also largely for study classes in churches and young peoples’ societies. The somewhat peculiar typography and paragraph arrangement are ac-counted for by the fact that an experience of six years has proven the desirability of some such aid to the busy student or reader. The Analytical Index at the close has likewise been found useful in the class-room, as well as to the reader who desires to learn at a glance the scope of the volume. [Continue reading]

26 Years of Missionary Work in China by Grace Stott

Grace Stott [?-1922], Twenty-Six Years of Missionary Work in ChinaGeorge & Grace Stott served with the China Inland Mission in southeastern Zhejiang province. The Biographical Dictionary of Chinese Christianity summarises their career as follows:

George Stott, the first missionary to Wenzhou, was a Scottish Protestant who worked with his wife, Grace. He arrived in China in 1866 and remained for over twenty-two years (1866-1888). (Grace Stott arrived two years after her husband and was involved with the Wenzhou church for almost thirty-eight years 1870-1908, fulltime until 1895). George Stott was one of the first two missionaries to be sent by China Inland Mission (CIM). While in Wenzhou, he and Grace began primary schools, preacher training courses, and several small congregations.

Grace Stott [?-1922], Twenty-Six Years of Missionary Work in China. London: Hodder & Stoughton, 1897. Hbk. pp.366. [Click to download complete book in PDF.]

Preface

The work of God recorded in these pages is no longer an experiment, and it is well that Mrs. Stott has been able, during her furlough, to put in more permanent form some of the incidents which many of us have heard with deepest interest from her own lips in missionary meetings, or on more private occasions.

It has been my privilege to be acquainted with this work from its commencement. With earnest prayer I commended Mr. Stott to God for his difficult journey, for in those times Wunchau was not a free port, and the eight days’ overland travel through unknown and mountainous country would have been somewhat formidable for a good walker, while for one on crutches it was much more so. He left Scotland, however, believing that “the lame should take the prey,” and he was spared to do so to no small extent. [Continue reading]

Biography of Alexander Duff, Missionary to India

Thomas Smith [1817-1906], Alexander Duff, D.D., LL.D.This is a copy of the Thomas Smith’s 1883 biography of the the noted missionary to India, Alexander Duff [1806-1878]. As the author points out, he had both an intimate knowledge of his subject and the co-operation of Duff’s official biographer Mr George Smith. My thanks to Redcliffe College for providing me with a copy of this book to scan. This title is in the public domain.

Thomas Smith [1817-1906], Alexander Duff, D.D., LL.D. London: Hodder & Stoughton, 1883. Hbk. pp.200. [Click to download complete book in PDF]

Chapter 1

In one important respect this volume differs from those which have hitherto appeared in the series to which it belongs. They had as their object the revival of memories which had faded; this, the perpetuation of a memory which is still fresh in the minds of many who will read it. They treated of “men worth remembering,” with whom their several authors had no personal associations; this treats of one who very lately lived and moved and had his being among us, and the memory of whose intimate personal friendship, long enjoyed, is to the author a very precious treasure. This difference is certainly in some respects advantageous, in others it will probably prove to be disadvantageous, to the author. It is, of course, an advantage to a biographer to have had an intimate knowledge of him whose doings he is to record, and whose character he is to delineate and estimate. [Continue reading]

Marie Christlieb’s Uphill Road in India

Marie Louise Christlieb [1868-1946] carried out evangelistic work in the villages of Hospet – present day Karnataka – in SW India in 1893, despite opposition from male colleagues. In this book she describes her work between 1906-1926 and is based on correspondence with a friend with whom she shared her first period of service in India. My thanks to Redcliffe College for providing a copy to scan. This title is in the public domain.

Marie Louise Christlieb [1868-1946], An Uphill Road in India. London: George Allen & Unwin, Ltd., 1927. Hbk. pp.253. [Download complete book in PDF]

Foreword

The following ·pages – as the dedication conveys – are collected from a correspondence covering a period of over twenty years. The friend to whom it was addressed shared the first period of service in India with the writer; of the beginning of their missionary work there is, therefore, no detailed record. The letters begin when the writer returned to India alone.

As they contained a great deal of merely personal interest some editing had to be done, also a few additions made here and there, as the public at home could not be counted upon to possess the knowledge of India as the recipient of the letters. For the sake of clearness in presenting some phase of work absolute chronology could not be observed in the sequence of chapters. All incidents, conversations, etc., are descriptions of current happenings.

The names of most places and of persons still living have been changed.

The book does not pretend to be a presentment of new facts concerning India; It is but a simple human recital of daily experiences among. a much-loved Eastern people. Should it help to provoke anyone to spend thought upon the great dependency to which we are so closely bound it would be great reward. [Continue reading]

A.R. MacDuff’s Memories of Missionary Life in North-Western India

A.R. MacDuff, The Utmost Bound of the Everlasting Hills or Memories of Christ's Frontier Force in North-Western IndiaThe Rev. A.R. MacDuff served as domestic chaplain to the Henry James Matthew Bishop of Lahore [15 January 1837 – 2 December 1898]. In this book he shares some of his experiences serving in the North West of India during the late 19th Century. Many thanks to Redcliffe College for providing me with a copy of the book to scan. This title is in the public domain.

A.R. MacDuff, The Utmost Bound of the Everlasting Hills or Memories of Christ’s Frontier Force in North-Western India. London: James Nisbet & Co., Ltd., 1902. Hbk. pp.279. [Click to download complete book in PDF]

Contents

  • Acknowledgement
  • Introduction
  • Bivouacking With a Bishop in the Bolan Pass
  • George Shirt, Roadmaker to the Great King
  • The Parson Who Laid His Cricket on God’s Altar
  • The Philanthropic Octopus of Kashmir
  • Moti, The Snow Leopard, and How he Became a London Lion
  • Three Earthly Stories with One Heavenly Meaning

Introduction

I was driving through the streets of a certain lakeside and collegiate town in the western portion of New York State and, as all strangers do, was admiring the, rows of umbrageous elms and maples with which its main thoroughfares are lined. Suddenly my companion – who by-the-bye occupied the seat of Jehu-pulled up to the sidewalk, and hailing a passing pedestrian, accosted him thus: “Howdy do? I’ve got your brother’s next-door neighbour with me, and I want to introduce him.” Then the “Man in the Street” made obeisance and confessed to fraternal relationship with the right reverend, the bishop of a vigorous and deeply interesting diocese in China. [Continue Reading]

500 More Missions Books for Digitisation

My thanks to the staff at the Cambridge Centre for Christianity Worldwide for providing me with 500 more missions books for possible digitisation. I have spent the last few days checking the copyright on each one.

Those that I can either get permission to use or are in the public domain have been put into my attic until I can scan them. The rest will be going to a UK Bible College.

This video shows just some of the many interesting titles in the collection

Arthur T. Pierson’s New Acts of the Apostles

Arthur T. Pierson [1837-1911], The New Acts of the Apostles or The Marvels of Modern MissionsArthur T. Pierson’s contribution to the Duff Missionary Lectureship series compares the missionary activities of the 19th Century church to that of the First. My thanks to Redcliffe College for providing me with a copy of the book to scan. This title is in the public domain.

Arthur T. Pierson [1837-1911], The New Acts of the Apostles or The Marvels of Modern Missions. A Series of Lectures Upon the Foundation of the “Duff Missionary Lectureship” Delivered in Scotland in February and March 1893. With a Chromo-Lithographic Map Showing the Prevailing Religions of the World, Their Comparative Areas and the Progress of Evangelisation. London: James Nisbet & Co. Ltd., 1901. Hbk. pp.451. [Click to download the complete book in PDF]

Contents

Introduction

Author’s Preface

Part 1. The New Links of Mission History

  1. The New Chapters
  2. The New Pentecosts
  3. The New Times and Seasons
  4. The New Open Doors
  5. The New Era

Part 2. The New Apostolic Succession

  1. The Calling of the New Apostles
  2. The New Pioneers
  3. The New Apostolate of Woman
  4. The New Lessons

Part 3. The New Visions and Voices

  1. The Leading Voice – The Voice of the Master
  2. The Call to All Disciples
  3. The Vision of the Field
  4. The New Lesson of the Power
  5. The New Ministry of the Spirit

Part 4. The New Converts and Martyrs

  1. The Miracle of Conversion
  2. New Converts and Martyrs
  3. Transformed Communities
  4. The New Witnesses and Workers

Part 5. The New Miracles

  1. The New Miracles
  2. New Opportunities and Preparations
  3. Providential Preservations
  4. New Judgments of God
  5. General Administration
  6. Miracles of Grace
  7. Rapidity of Results
  8. Answers to Prayer

Part 6. The New Motives and Incentives

  1. The Look Forward
  2. The New Order of Things
  3. Medical Missions
  4. The New Activity of Woman
  5. New Lessons from Experience
  6. New Incentives to Giving
  7. The New Appeal of Man
  8. Harmony With God’s Purpose
  9. The Blessed Hope
  10. The New Outlook

Pennell of the Indian Frontier

Norman James Davidson [1860-1936], Pennell of the India FrontierThe story of Theodore L. Pennell [1867-1912] and his work as a medical missionary on the Afghan frontier retold for children. My thanks to Redcliffe College for providing me with a copy of the book to scan. This title is in the public domain.

Norman James Davidson [1860-1936], Pennell of the India Frontier. The Fine Story of Dr. T.L. Pennell’s Life on the Afghan Frontier Told for Boys & Girls. London: Seeley, Service & Co. Ltd., 1927. Hbk. pp.60. [Click to download complete book in PDF]

The family of the Pennells is of ancient West-country origin, and traces its descent from ancestors who were already living at Penhall, in Cornwall, before the Conquest. Subsequently the family moved to Lupton in Devonshire, where they resided for some centuries.

About 1890, John Penhale and Richard Penhale are recorded as being Priors of Plympton Priory, and in 1415, a certain Richard Pennell, who was Canon of Crediton and Exeter, and Vicar of Paignton, became Archdeacon of Cornwall. He was also President of the Consistorial Council.

Among the girls, chief interest is attached to Rosamond, who at the age of six weeks was adopted by her eldest sister, then the wife of the Right Hon. John Wilson Croker. It was only by accident that she eventually learned that her supposed mother was really her sister. She was celebrated for her beauty, and her portrait at the age of seventeen by Sir Thomas Lawrence is a renowned and familiar picture. When a child at Kensington Palace, she was sent for to play with Queen Victoria. The ” Croker Papers ” are full of references to “Nony,” as she was called. [Continue reading]

Thirty Years in Madagascar with the Rev T.T. Matthews

Thomas Trotter Matthews [1842-1928], Thirty Years in Madagascar Thomas Trotter Matthews [1842-1928] was an LMS missionary in Madagascar.

Born in Aberdeen, Scotland, Matthews was influenced by the 1859 revival movement and volunteered to the London Missionary Society. He studied theology at the Congregational colleges in Manchester and Highgate and took some medical studies. He was appointed to Madagascar in 1870 as part of the reinforcement and development of the mission there following the accession of Rànavàlona II, the first Christian monarch, in 1868. [Biographical Dictionary of Christian Mission, p.442.]

My thanks to Redcliffe College for providing me with a copy of this book to scan. This title is in the public domain.

Thomas Trotter Matthews [1842-1928], Thirty Years in Madagascar with Sixty-Two Illustrations From Photographs and Sketches. London: The Religious Tract Society, 1904. Hbk. pp.383. [Click to download complete book in PDF]

Contents

  1. A Land of Darkness
  2. ‘The Killing Times’
  3. From Darkness to Dawn
  4. The Morning Breaking
  5. Bealking Up the Fallow Ground
  6. Early Experiences
  7. Shadow and Sunshine
  8. District Journeys and Incidents
  9. Development and Consolidation
  10. The Dead Past
  11. Progress All Along the Line
  12. Gathering Clouds
  13. Bible Revision and ‘An Old Disciple’
  14. The Light Extending
  15. The Conquest of Madagascar
  16. Trials, Triumphs, and Terrors
  17. The End of the Monarchy
  18. The Triumph of the Gospel
  • Index

Preface

For the facts of the historical introduction I am mainly indebted to the writings of earlier writers and missionaries, and to unpublished native accounts of the earlier years of the mission and of the persecutions; for mine would have been almost impossible had it not been for the labours of those other workers in the same field, and for the native sources I have mentioned. Without such knowledge as this introduction gives no correct conception can be formed of Madagascar and the Malagasy, of the work done for and among them, the present condition and future prospects of the people, and of the future of Christian work in the island. [Continue reading]

Africa Inland Mission Work in Central Africa

Daniel Morison Miller [1888-1965], Central Africa Revisited. A 16,000 Mile Tour Thoughout the Fields of the Africa Inland Mission in Kenya, Tanganyika, Uganda, Congo, Sudan and EgyptDaniel Miller [1888-1965] was the Deputation and Editorial Secretary of the Africa Inland Mission (A.I.M.). In the 1930s he undertook a 16,000 mile tour of A.I.M. stations in Africa and this book records what he found. My thanks to the team at Africa Inland Missions’ UK office who established that no living descendant of the author could be located. If anyone knows who might have inherited the rights to this title, please contact me. My thanks to Redcliffe College for providing me with a copy of the book to scan.

Daniel Morison Miller [1888-1965], Central Africa Revisited. A 16,000 Mile Tour Thoughout the Fields of the Africa Inland Mission in Kenya, Tanganyika, Uganda, Congo, Sudan and Egypt. London: Africa Inland Mission / London & Edinburgh: Marshall, Morgan & Scott, [1938]. Hbk. pp.121. [Click to download complete book in PDF]

Contents

  • Preface
  • Foreword
  1. Africa Through the Years
  2. The Journey Out
  3. Through Mountainous Kenya
  4. The Eldoret Area
  5. In Western Tanganyika
  6. Across the Waterways of Uganda
  7. Back in the Belgian Congo
  8. Through Egypt Via Upper and Lower Sudan
  9. The Goal
  • Epilogue

From the Dust Jacket

A record of a 16,000 mile tour through East and Central Africa. The scenes are vividly portrayed and include descriptions of:- Kenya, with its lofty mountains and picturesque tribes; the Eldoret Area on the edge of the rift valley populated by the “Cliff-dwellers” and other nomadic tribes; Tanganyika with its peace loving Basukumu, living among fantastic rocks and rolling plains. Crossing  Uganda, with its numerous waterways, a pause is made in the West Nile district to review a remarkable piece of missionary work; then follows a description of the Belgian Congo in its tropical setting, inhabited by a great variety of people. The writer turning homewards follows the winding course of the White Nile for 1,300 miles to Khartoum; crosses the scorching desert to the rainless area around Shellal, through Egypt and thus home. [Continue reading]

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