Then and Now in the Kenya Colony by Willis R. Hotchkiss

Willis Ray Hotchkiss [1873-1948], Then and Now in Kenya Colony. Forty Adventurous Years in East Africa

This is an account by Willis Ray Hotchkiss [1873-1948] of his 40 years of service with the Africa Inland Mission in Kenya. My thanks to Redcliffe College for making this book, which entered the public domain this year, available for digitisation.

Willis Ray Hotchkiss [1873-1948], Then and Now in Kenya Colony. Forty Adventurous Years in East Africa. London & Edinburgh: Oliphants, 1937. Hbk. pp.160. [Click to visit the download page for this title]

Contents

  • Foreword by Lewis Speery Chafer
  1. The Beginning of the Trail
  2. Heading into the Unknown
  3. Adventures by the Way
  4. Our Troubles Begin
  5. A Rhino Saves the Situation
  6. Down in the Depths
  7. Testing and Proving the Promise
  8. The Beginning in Lumbwa
  9. Some Side Lights on Missionary Work
  10. Meet a Great Medicine Man
  11. Progress is Not Always Forward
  12. The Curse of Babal Still Here
  13. Some Strange Things
  14. Flying Over Africa

Foreword

…. Mr. Hotchkiss went out as one of the first missionaries of the Africa Inland Mission. That he achieved much under God for that great movement in its early days is disclosed in one terse sentence written by the late Charles Hurlburt, founder of the Mission, to Mr. Hotchkiss’ mother regarding the early crisis in the Mission : ” Surely through your faithful son God has saved this work for His own glory.” The reading of this thrilling narrative in manuscript form has stirred my own heart as few missionary records have ever done. The book will claim a large place in missionary literature. Christian character and courage are both contagious, and none can avoid the uplift who will read this modest record of Mr. Hotchkiss’ great life and service.


Lewis Sperry Chafer, page 6

Short Introduction to Christian Missions by Eugene Stock

Eugene Stock [1836-1928], A Short Handbook of Missions

Eugene Stock, who also wrote the massive 4-volume History of the Church Missionary Society, provides a brief – but nonetheless comprehensive – introduction to Christian missions. My thanks to the Cambridge Centre of Christianity Worldwide for providing a copy of this public domain title for digitisation.

Eugene Stock [1836-1928], A Short Handbook of Missions. London: Longmans, Green, and Co., 1904. Hbk. pp.214. [Click to visit the download page for this title]

Contents

  • Prefatory Note
  1. What is a Mission?
  2. The Purpose of Missions
  3. The Motive of Missions
  4. The Need of Missions
  5. The Methods of Missions
  6. The Mission Agencies
  7. The Missionaries
  8. The Administration of Missions
  9. The Support of Missions
  10. Missions and Governments
  11. The World’s Population: Races, Languages, Religions
  12. Non-Christian Religions and Christianity
  13. Objections and Criticisms
  14. Seventeen Centuries of the Christian Era
  15. The Eighteenth Century
  16. The Nineteenth Century—1801–1840
  17. The Nineteenth Century—1841–1872
  18. The Nineteenth Century—1872–1900
  19. General Progress since 1872
  20. Results of Protestant Missions
  21. Testimonies
  22. Some Notable Missionaries
  23. Some Prominent Native Christians
  24. Some Auxiliary Helpers of Missions
  25. Missions of the Greek and Roman Churches
  26. Mission to the Jews
  27. Fields to be Worked
  28. Obstacles to be Encountered
  29. Opportunities and Resources
  30. “In This Generation”?
  31. Edification of Converts
  32. Building the Visible Church
  33. Aid for the Daughter Churches
  34. “I Believe in the Holy Ghost”

Appendix

  1. Some Books for Study
  2. Chronological Table

Prefatory Note

The last few years have seen a great change in the attitude of the Christian public towards what are called Foreign Missions. There was in the past a great deal of earnest sympathy with them, and liberal support of them, although in comparatively limited circles; but the principles and methods, the history and environment, of Missions, were not systematically studied. It is in this respect that the change is apparent. Old missionaries on their forty or fifth or sixth furloughs say that, as they go about the country to preach and speak in behalf of the cause, they find an intelligent knowledge and appreciation of the work which is new. It is partly a cause and partly a result of this increase of knowledge that missionary books of all kinds are multiplying, and find a ready sale.

But still, for the direction of the study now becoming less uncommon, some more definite guidance seems to be called for…

Page v.

Biography of Daniel Mtusu by Donald Fraser

Daniel Mtusu (frontispiece)

This biography of Malawian Christian Daniel Mtusa was written by Donald Fraser, based on Mtusu’s own account of his life. My thanks to Redcliffe College for making a copy of this public domain title available for digitisation.

Donald Fraser [1870-1933], The Autobiography of an African. Retold in Biographical Form & in the Wild African Setting of the Life of Daniel Mtusu. London: Seeley, Service & Co Ltd., 1925. Hbk. pp.210. [Click to visit the download page for this title]

Contents

  1. The Red Land and the Red Chief
  2. The Child
  3. The Herd-Lad
  4. The House-Boy
  5. The Contest
  6. War
  7. Restless Desires
  8. Discussions
  9. The Decision
  10. The Baptism
  11. The Witness
  12. A Shameful Assault
  13. Citizenship
  14. Adventures
  15. The Teacher
  16. Pioneering
  17. Beulah Land
  18. A Filibuster
  19. An Adventorous Journey
  20. Tempting Offers
  21. A Village Flitting
  22. The Evangelist
  23. Perils of the Way
  24. The Preacher
  25. His Character
  26. His Death
  • Author’s Note

Author’s Note

A few years ago I asked Daniel Mtusu, the subject of this book, to write for roe an account of his life. He had completed it to a period a little beyond the time of his baptism, and was contemplating a further instalment when he died. His friend, the Rev. Andrew Mkochi, completed the story for me. I have rewritten in English what they have told me in their own language, and have added a certain amount of background to their pictures, so as to make them more intelligible to readers at home. I have followed throughout their account of events, and especially Daniel’s own story of his youth and mental awakening.

My thanks are due to Rev. Charles Stuart, Miss Genner and to my wife for revising what I have written, and for many valuable suggestions. Rev. Alex. A. Russell has most kindly seen the book through the press, a work which I could not do personally, as I am in Nyasaland and my publisher in London…

Page 8

Massacre at Sianfu

E.R. Beckman [1866-?], The Massacre at Sianfu and Other Experiences in Connection With the Scandinavian Alliance Mission of North America

This is an account of the experiences of members of the Scandinavian Alliance Mission of North America in China, during the Xinhai Revolution of 1911. My thanks to Redcliffe College for providing a copy of this public domain title for digitisation.

E.R. Beckman [1866-?], The Massacre at Sianfu and Other Experiences in Connection With the Scandinavian Alliance Mission of North America. Chicago: J.V. Martenson, 1913. Hbk. pp.138. [Click to visit the download page for this title]

Contents

  • Preface
  • The Scandinavian Alliance Mission
  • Field of Work in China of the Scandinavian Alliance Mission of North America
  • During Our Sojourn in the Homelands
  • Forebodings of the Revolution
  • The Revolutionary Outbreak
  • The Attack
  • Mr W.T. Vatne
  • Our Stay at the Military Academy
  • The Funeral
  • Confusing Conditions in General
  • The Journey to the Coast
  • Foreigners Murdered and Illtreated in Other Parts of the Country
  • Sympathy Shown Me at Shanghai and Other Places
  • Mr W.T. Want’s Account to the President
  • From Shanghai to Stockholm by the Siberian Route
  • New Trials

Preface

The terrible incident which took place at Sianfu, China, when the revolution broke out there in October 1911, has greatly stirred up the feelings of a large number of friends of the Mission in the homelands.
I have repeatedly been asked to relate the story of this outrage by which some of my fellow workers and I were cruelly beheaded our dear ones, whose blood was shed, so to speak, to saturate the gospel seed which had been sown du1·ing the preceeding years; and how I succeeded to rescue my youngest child, a four year old girl, by running through the raging mob, which pursued and hunted me throughout the night.
In order to satisfy the many friends who wished to know the details of this incident and still avoid the hard task of continually repeating this heartrenching story, a book was published in the Swedish language soon after I arrived in Sweden on my way from China relating this sorrowful event.

Page 5

Crusader in Kashmir by Ernest F. Neve

Ernest Frederic Neve [1861-1946], A Crusader in Kashmir. Being the Life of Dr Arthur Neve, with an Account of the Medical Missionary Work of Two Brothers & Its Later Developments Down to the Present Day

A biography of Arthur Neve, medical missionary to Kashmir, written by his younger brother. My thanks to Redcliffe College for providing a copy of this public domain book for digitisation.

Ernest Frederic Neve [1861-1946], A Crusader in Kashmir. Being the Life of Dr Arthur Neve, with an Account of the Medical Missionary Work of Two Brothers & Its Later Developments Down to the Present Day. London: Seeley, Service & Co. Ltd., 1928. [Click to visit the download page for this title]

Contents

  1. Arthur Neve—Early Days
  2. Evolution of a Medical Mission
  3. A Practical Idealist
  4. Arthur Neve, Pioneer & Travellers
  5. The Campaign Extended
  6. Last Years of Service
  7. Medical Missions: Their Utility & Influence
  8. Medical Missions: Their Place & Power
  9. The Kashmir Medical Missions Hospital
  10. In the Wards
  11. Full Speed Ahead
  12. The Problem of Leprosy
  13. Is Leprosy Contagious?
  14. Can Lepers be Cleansed?
  15. Amongst the Villages
  16. A Land of Rovers & Mountain Passes
  17. A Mountain Climb
  18. Further Afield
  19. Near the Roof of the World
  20. Aims & Achievements
  • Index

Introduction

Has the Church of Great Britain, using the word in its widest acceptation, at all adequately heard or acted upon the call to go over and help India? Has there ever been manifested more than a minute fraction of the zeal in carrying on a modern crusade in India which was shown by the heroic and chivalrous but misguided hordes who poured Eastward to recover an empty Sepulchre and who fought the Moslem with his own weapons?

Taking India as a whole, the Church of Christ is in contact chiefly with three great groups of peoples the Hindus, the Mohammedans and the Depressed classes.

It is common knowledge that the last group is very accessible to Christian teaching. Many thousands have been baptized both in the south, where the work of the Indian Bishop of Dornakal is well known, and also in the north, where the chief numerical additions to the Church have been from this class.

Page 11

African Idylls by Donald Fraser

Donald Fraser [1870-1933], African Idylls. Portraits & Impressions of Life on a Central African Mission Station

An account of the work of Donald Fraser, a notable missionary to Malawi. My thanks to the Cambridge Centre for Christianity Worldwide for making this public domain title available for digitisation.

Donald Fraser [1870-1933], African Idylls. Portraits & Impressions of Life on a Central African Mission Station, 3rd edn. London: Seeley, Service & Co., Ltd., 1923. Hbk. pp.229. [Click to visit the download page for this title]

Contents

  1. Our African Home
  2. A School in Central Africa
  3. An African Beadle
  4. A Holiday on the Hills
  5. Lost in the Bush
  6. “The Needy One”
  7. The Motor Fiend
  8. The Aftermath
  9. A True Knight
  10. A Wanderer Returned
  11. Waterfinisher—A Carrier
  12. The Beloved Madman
  13. From Death to Life
  14. Man’s Gratitude to Man
  15. Magic
  16. Central African Vignettes

Chapter 1: Our African Home

The station stands in a wide, open space surrounded on all sides by a broad belt of trees. The dense wood has been cut, and in its place a low, creeping dub grass has been planted, beloved of the herd of cattle that roams around in the months when the grass is green and succulent. Here and there are wide, spreading trees, and on both sides of the main roads avenues of oranges and mangoes, blue gums and cypresses, are gradually creeping up, promising to make a brave show in the future. Winds blow all day through the station during the dry season, bringing freshness and vigour that were strangers to the thick wood, and causing some irritation to the resident who loves a quiet peace, and not a little confusion to the modest native, whose dress is but a loose girdling of calico.

Pages 17-18.

History of the Presbyterian Mission to China and Formosa

James Johnston [1819-1905], China and Formosa. The Story of the Mission of the Presbyterian Church of England

This is a well-illustrated history of the work of the English Presbyterian mission in China and Formosa (now Taiwan). My thanks to the Cambridge Centre for Christianity Worldwide for providing a copy of this rare public domain title for digitisation.

James Johnston [1819-1905], China and Formosa. The Story of the Mission of the Presbyterian Church of England. London: Hazell, Watson & Viney, Ltd., 1897. Hbk. pp.400. [Click to visit the download page for this title]

Contents

  • Preface
  1. Origin of the China Mission of the Presbyterian Church of England
  2. The Mission Field
  3. The People and Their Disposition Towards Us
  4. The Practical Religion of the Chinese
  5. The Planting of the Mission
  6. Times of Blessing
  7. The Story of the Amoy Mission
  8. The Story of the Shatow Mission
  9. The Story of the Formosa Mission
  10. A Retrospect
  11. Looking Forward
  12. The Story of the Amoy Mission (continued)
  13. The Story of the Amoy Mission (continued)
  14. The Story of the Shatow Mission (continued)
  15. The Story of the Shatow Mission (continued)
  16. The Story of the Formosa Mission (continued)
  17. The Story of the Formosa Mission (continued)
  18. The Story of the Singapore Mission
  19. Facts and Reflections
  20. Other Missions in China
  • Appendix
  • Index

Preface

In writing the history of the Mission of the Presbyterian Church of England during the last fifty years, at the request of several of its Missionaries, and with the approval of the Committee, my great aim has been to bring the remote near, and to make the strange familiar. To do this I have endeavoured, by descriptions of the country and its people, to bring the field of labour, and the nature of the work, before the minds of our people at home, and by allowing the Missionaries to tell their own tale of difficulties, trials, and sorrows, and of triumphs, encouragements, and joys, in their own words, to bring them near to the hearts of all interested in the progress of the kingdom of God in heathen lands.

In this my chief difficulty has been the modest reserve of the Missionaries in all that was personal…

Page vii

Beyond the Pir Panjal by Ernest F. Neve

Ernest Frederic Neve [1861-1946], Beyond the Pir Panjal. Life and Missionary Enterprise in Kashmir

Dr Ernest Neve “…joined his brother, Arthur Neve, MD (1858-1919), at Srinagar, Kashmir in 1886, working at the Church Missionary Society’s Hospital, to which he eventually became consulting surgeon in 1923. While working in India he won the Gunning-Lister prize from Edinburgh University in 1889. In 1892 he founded the Kashmir Government Leper Asylum and was for many years its honorary superintendent. Neve was an excellent administrator and a general surgeon who accomplished a great deal of sound work, while living as a devout Christian in a predominantly Muslim country.” [Plarr’s Lives of the Fellows]

My thanks to the Cambridge Centre for Christianity Worldwide for maing this public domain itle available for digitisation.

Ernest Frederic Neve [1861-1946], Beyond the Pir Panjal. Life and Missionary Enterprise in Kashmir. London: Church Missionary Society, 1914. Hbk. pp.178. View in PDF format pdf [This material is in the Public Domain]

Contents

  • Preface
  1. The Vale of Kashmir
  2. Historical Epochs
  3. The People
  4. Srinagar
  5. The Kashmir Mission School
  6. The Kashmir Medical Mission
  7. The Mission Hospital
  8. Village Life
  9. Medical Mission Camp Work
  10. A Glimpse of Kashmiri Tibet
  11. The Upper Indus Valley
  12. Sphere of Influence of Medical Mission Work
  13. Development of Kashmir

Chapter 1: The Vale of Kashmir

Kashmir owes much of its fame to its varied phases of beauty. These are partly due to the seasons. But the different alti-tudes, with their countless slopes· and upland meadows, some with northern and others with southern aspect, con-tinually provide a simultaneous presentation of the beauties of successive seasons. In the hottest summer weather, for instance, when in the valley the temperature is over 90° F. in the shade, when the air is laden with moisture and mos-quitoes abound, a ride or drive of 30 miles and a climb of 3000 feet will take us to where the atmosphere is fresh and cool. Another two or three thousand feet of ascent will bring us to snow and to early spring flowers such as primulas and anemones. And looking down from the heights to the plain below, ‘\ith its masses of foliage dimly discernible in the midst of the heat haze, we appreciate the effect of alti-tude on climate.

Page 1

Missionary Principles and Practice by Robert E. Speer

A handbook on missionary principles by the American Presbyterian missiologist Robert Elliott Speer [1867-1947]. My thanks to Redcliffe College for providing a copy of this public domain book for digitisation.

Robert E. Speer [1867-1947], Missionary Principles and Practice. A Discussion of Christian Missions and of some Criticisms upon them, 3rd edn. New York/London: Fleming H. Revell Co., 1902. Hbk. pp.552. [Click to visit the Robert Speer page to download this and other titles by this author]

Contents

  • Preface
  • Part I. General Principles Stated
  1. Missions—Primary and Essential in Christianity
  2. Common Honesty and Foreign Missions
  3. The Need of the Non-Christian World for Christ
  4. What are Christian Missionaries Trying to Do?
  5. The Aim of Christian Missions
  6. The Science of Missions
  7. The Kind of Men Needed in Foreign Missions
  8. Some Current Criticisms of Missions
  9. The Assumption Underlying Missionary Criticism
  10. Missions and Spiritual Life
  11. Missionaries and Their Rights
  12. Christianity the Solitary and Sufficient Religion

    Part II. General Principles Applied
  13. The Iniquity of Christian Missions in China
  14. Are the Missionaries Responsible for the Troubles in China?
  15. The Scuttle Policy in China
  16. Has Missionary Work in China Been Worth While?
  17. Minister Wu’s Confucian Propaganda
  18. A Roman Catholic View of Missions in China
  19. Higher Education in Missions with Special Reference to Conditions in China
  20. Truth or Tolerance
  21. Some Missionary Aspects of Paul’s First Itineration
  22. Some Missionary Aspects of Paul’s Second Itineration

    Part III. Need and Results
  23. Impressions of Christian Missions in Asia
  24. Persian Mohammedans and Mohammedanism
  25. Glimpses of Life on a Persian Highway
  26. On the Corpse Road
  27. Why Christianity Appeals to the Japanese
  28. Shosaburo Aoyama, A Japanese Christian Gentleman
  29. Four Life Stories
  30. Pastor Tsiang’s Story
  31. A Chinese Preacher
  32. Two Korean Christians
  33. Missionary Biographies
  34. Missionary Heroism I Have Known
  35. Li Hung Chang and Christian Missions
  36. The Civilizing Influence of Missions
  37. The Propagation of Christianity in the Last Century

    Part IV. Privilege and Duty
  38. The Missionary Spirit of the Christian Life
  39. Christ, the Desire of the Nations
  40. What Christ Has Done for Woman
  41. Prayer and Missions
  42. The Holy Spirit and Missions
  43. The Resources of the Christian Church
  44. The Evangelization of the World in this Generation
  45. The Speedy Bringing of the World to Christ

100 Years of Gospel Work Among the Telugu People of India

Eustace Blake Bromley [1882-1946], They Were Men Sent From God. A Centenary Record (1836-1936) of Gospel Work in India amonst Telugas in the Godavari Delta and neighbouring parts.

This is an account of the men and women who worked among the Telugu people of the Indian states of Andhra Pradesh and Telangana between 1836 and 1936. The copy of the book kindy provided by Redcliffe College of digitisation was signed by the author. This title is in the public domain.

Eustace Blake Bromley [1882-1946], They Were Men Sent From God. A Centenary Record (1836-1936) of Gospel Work in India amonst Telugas in the Godavari Delta and neighbouring parts. Bangalore: The Scripture Literature Press, 1937. Hbk. pp.199. [Click to visit the download page]

Contents

  • Foreword
  1. Introductory
  2. Christian Contacts Prior to Missionary Occupation
  3. Preparation of the Chosen Instruments
  4. The Voyage to Madras, 1830
  5. Mr Anthony Norris Groves and India
  6. Madras in 1836
  7. In Masulipatam, 1836, 1837
  8. Settlement in Narsapur, 1837
  9. Early Struggle and Trials, 1837, 1838
  10. The Antarvedi Festival
  11. The Situation Gets More Depressing, 1838, 1839
  12. Palakol Occupied and Narsapur Reoccupied, 1839-1842
  13. Dawn at Last! 1842
  14. Proving God in Quiet Plodding, 1843-1847
  15. Andhradesa’s Debto to Christian Laymen
  16. Dowlaishweram, 1847, 1848
  17. The Godavari Delta Mission
  18. Station Work in the Early Times
  19. Converts From Caste, 1850, 1851
  20. Mr. Beer’s Systematic Itinerations
  21. Mr. Beer’s Closing Labours and Death, 1852, 1853
  22. The Situation Met With Fortitude, 1854, 1855
  23. Mr. Heelis Joins the Mission
  24. Evangelising the Hill Peoples, 1856-1858
  25. Subbareddi’s Rebellion, 1858
  26. The Gospel Borne Still Farther Afield, 1859, 1860
  27. “Which Doeth Great Things Past Finding Out”
  28. The Planting of Village Churches
  29. Mr. John Beer and the Narsapur School
  30. The Passing of Mr. Bowden
  31. Mrs. Bowden’s Home Call and Family Succession
  32. The Macraes and Amalapuram Field
  33. The Rounding Off of Our Story
  • Index

Foreword

The one thousand mile train journey from Madras to Calcutta skirting the Bay of Bengal is full of interest, revealing as it does the real Hindu India. In contrast to the West Coast, signs of Mohammedans, Portuguese and Parsees arc rare. Palm trees, ghauts, temples, tanks, rice-fields, sacred rivers and thatched roof villages are the predominant features of the landscape. Beside these things of immemorial antiquity the modern gifts of India’s best friend, are not incongruous and need no apology; railways, canals, roads, bridges and dams, holding in check the forces of famine and flood.

Leaving Madras by die night mail one is usually awakened before dawn by the noisy passage of the train over the many spans of the Kistna Bridge, nearly three hundred miles northwaird. One hundred: miles farther north-east is the great River Godavari. Roughly between these two rivers and in the neighbourhood of their deltas is the area known to Christians all over the world as the Godavari Mission Field.

Page i.