100 Years of Gospel Work Among the Telugu People of India

Eustace Blake Bromley [1882-1946], They Were Men Sent From God. A Centenary Record (1836-1936) of Gospel Work in India amonst Telugas in the Godavari Delta and neighbouring parts.

This is an account of the men and women who worked among the Telugu people of the Indian states of Andhra Pradesh and Telangana between 1836 and 1936. The copy of the book kindy provided by Redcliffe College of digitisation was signed by the author. This title is in the public domain.

Eustace Blake Bromley [1882-1946], They Were Men Sent From God. A Centenary Record (1836-1936) of Gospel Work in India amonst Telugas in the Godavari Delta and neighbouring parts. Bangalore: The Scripture Literature Press, 1937. Hbk. pp.199. [Click to visit the download page]

Contents

  • Foreword
  1. Introductory
  2. Christian Contacts Prior to Missionary Occupation
  3. Preparation of the Chosen Instruments
  4. The Voyage to Madras, 1830
  5. Mr Anthony Norris Groves and India
  6. Madras in 1836
  7. In Masulipatam, 1836, 1837
  8. Settlement in Narsapur, 1837
  9. Early Struggle and Trials, 1837, 1838
  10. The Antarvedi Festival
  11. The Situation Gets More Depressing, 1838, 1839
  12. Palakol Occupied and Narsapur Reoccupied, 1839-1842
  13. Dawn at Last! 1842
  14. Proving God in Quiet Plodding, 1843-1847
  15. Andhradesa’s Debto to Christian Laymen
  16. Dowlaishweram, 1847, 1848
  17. The Godavari Delta Mission
  18. Station Work in the Early Times
  19. Converts From Caste, 1850, 1851
  20. Mr. Beer’s Systematic Itinerations
  21. Mr. Beer’s Closing Labours and Death, 1852, 1853
  22. The Situation Met With Fortitude, 1854, 1855
  23. Mr. Heelis Joins the Mission
  24. Evangelising the Hill Peoples, 1856-1858
  25. Subbareddi’s Rebellion, 1858
  26. The Gospel Borne Still Farther Afield, 1859, 1860
  27. “Which Doeth Great Things Past Finding Out”
  28. The Planting of Village Churches
  29. Mr. John Beer and the Narsapur School
  30. The Passing of Mr. Bowden
  31. Mrs. Bowden’s Home Call and Family Succession
  32. The Macraes and Amalapuram Field
  33. The Rounding Off of Our Story
  • Index

Foreword

The one thousand mile train journey from Madras to Calcutta skirting the Bay of Bengal is full of interest, revealing as it does the real Hindu India. In contrast to the West Coast, signs of Mohammedans, Portuguese and Parsees arc rare. Palm trees, ghauts, temples, tanks, rice-fields, sacred rivers and thatched roof villages are the predominant features of the landscape. Beside these things of immemorial antiquity the modern gifts of India’s best friend, are not incongruous and need no apology; railways, canals, roads, bridges and dams, holding in check the forces of famine and flood.

Leaving Madras by die night mail one is usually awakened before dawn by the noisy passage of the train over the many spans of the Kistna Bridge, nearly three hundred miles northwaird. One hundred: miles farther north-east is the great River Godavari. Roughly between these two rivers and in the neighbourhood of their deltas is the area known to Christians all over the world as the Godavari Mission Field.

Page i.

History of the Church in Armenia

Malachia Ormanian [1841-1918], The Church of Armenia. Her History, Doctrine, Rule, Discipline, Liturgy, Literature, and Existing Condition

This history of the church in Armenia was originally published in French.

Malachia Ormanian [1841-1918], The Church of Armenia. Her History, Doctrine, Rule, Discipline, Liturgy, Literature, and Existing Condition. Oxford: A.R. Mowbray & Co., Ltd., [1912]. Hbk. pp.271. [Click to visit the download page for this book]

Contents

  • Introduction by Bishop Welldon
  • Preface
  • List of Armenian Names With Their Equivilents in English
  • Preface to the French Edition
  • Introductory
  1. Origin of the Armenian Church
  2. The Primitive Era of the Armenian Church
  3. The Complete Conversion of Armenia
  4. Formation of the Ecclesiastical Hierachy
  5. The Armenian Church in the Fourth Century
  6. The Beginning of Armenian Literature
  7. The Armenian Church in the Fifith Century
  8. The Council of Chalcedon
  9. A Succession of Quarrels
  10. A Return to the Quarrels
  11. Peregrinations of Patriarchs
  12. The Patriarchal Set of Cilicia
  13. Attempts Toward Union
  14. Leanings Toward Unity
  15. The Return to Etchmiadzin
  16. The Patriarchate of Constantinople
  17. A Period of Awakening
  18. A Survey of the Eighteenth Century
  19. A Survey of the Nineteenth Century

    Doctrine
  20. The Principles of Dogmas
  21. The Dogmas of the Armenian Church
  22. The Profession of Faith
  23. The Spirit of Tolerance
  24. The Doctrine of Sacraments
  25. Precision in Doctrine

    Rule
  26. Organisation of the Hierarchy
  27. The Armenian Hierarchy
  28. Ecclesiastical Functions

    Discipline
  29. The Clergy and Celibacy
  30. The Ecclesiastical Revenues
  31. The Laity in the Church
  32. The Name of the Church

    Liturgy
  33. The Church Buildings
  34. The Ministers of Worship
  35. The Obligations of Worship
  36. The System of the Calendar
  37. The Dominical Festivals
  38. The Commemoration of Saints

    Literature
  39. A General Survey
  40. The Latest Signs

    The Present Time
  41. The External Aspect
  42. The Various Sects
  43. The National Character
  44. The Influence of the Church

Appendices

  1. Chronology of Supreme Patriarchs
  2. Statistics of Armenian Dioceses
  • Index


Timothy Richard of China

Timothy Richard in the Library at Shanghai

Timothy Richard was born in Wales and was converted during the 1859-60 Revival. He responded to the call to overseas service and served with the Baptist Missionary Society in China. He became convinced that the indigenous church should be self-supporting and that evangelism was best done by native Chinese Christians. The Ex-patriate missionaries should devote their time to working with the intelligentsia of China and combine outreach with development. After the Boxer uprising of 1900 he was instrumental in the establishment of Shanghai University.

My thanks to Redcliffe College for making a copy of this public domain title available for digitisation.

William E. Soothill [1861-1935], Timothy Richard of China. Seer, Statesman, Missionary & Most Disinterested Adviser the Chinese Ever Had. London: Seeley, Service & Co. Ltd., 1924. Hbk. pp.330.

Visit the Timothy Richard page for the download link for this title and other resources.

Contents

  1. Foreword
  2. Early Life in Wales
  3. China in the Sixties
  4. Pioneering in Shantung & Manchuria
  5. Chefoo
  6. Farewell to Chefoo
  7. Ch’ing-Choo-Fu
  8. Famine Relief: Shantung
  9. Famine Relief: Shansi
  10. Pioneering in Shansi
  11. Developments in Shansi
  12. T’ai-yuan, Ch’ing-Chou & Peking
  13. First Furlough
  14. In Exile
  15. Christian Literature Society: Work in Shanghai
  16. Chino-Japanese War
  17. T’ien-T’ai
  18. Enlightening the Government on Missions
  19. The Reform Society
  20. Second Furlough
  21. The Reform Movement
  22. Second Furlough
  23. The Reform Movement
  24. The Boxer Madness
  25. The Shansi University: A Dream Fulfilled
  26. Between the Boxers & The Revolution
  27. Conferences at Home
  28. Visits to Japan & Korea
  29. The Revolution
  30. Buddhism
  31. Home Again
  • Index

Foreword

Dr Timothy Richard the subject of this biography, which must have been a labour of love to Professor Soothill, his co-worker in later years, was for over forty years an outstanding personality in China, and gained the respect and esteem of the Chinese people in a degree which it has been given to few foreigners to attain. My recollection of him dates from the seventies of last century, when he and a few other devoted missionaries threw themselves into the formidable task of organizing relief work in connection with an appalling famine in Shansi, and laid the foundation of all the subsequent efforts which have been made with so much success to cope with these constantly recurring calamities in China. Dr Richard’s work in Shansi brought him into close relations with the ruling classes, and convinced him of the necessity of diffusing throughout the country a knowledge of the humanitarian principles and methods of government practised in the West…

Biography of Archibald Orr Ewing

Archibald Orr Ewing [1857-1930]
Archibald Orr Ewing [1857-1930]

Archibald Orr Ewing [1857-1930] was born into a wealthy family in Scotland. Deeply influenced by his experience of the revival in Glasgow led by D.L. Moody in 1882 and by attending the Keswick Convention in 1885 he devoted himself to missionary service. He served with the China Inland Mission from 1886 to 1911.

My thanks to Book Aid for making a copy of this public domain title available for digitisation.

Marshall Broomhall [1866-1937], Archibald Orr Ewing. ‘That faithful and wise Steward’. London: China Inland Mission, 1930. Hbk. pp.150. [Click to visit the download page]

Contents

  • Foreword
  • A Celebrated Lawsuit
  • Things Temporal
  • Things Eternal
  • A Living Gospel
  • A Willing Servant
  • A Living Sacrifice
  • A Comforter of Many
  • A Cheerful; Giver
  • A Man in Christ
  • A Better Possession
  • Epilogue

Foreword

There are many men and women who have gladly devoted their lives to the mission field; there are many others who have generously given of their substance for the same cause; but only a few have been privileged to do both. Archibald Orr Ewing was one of these few. Though as a young man he inherited wealth, and had this world’s best before him, he definitely, unostentatiously, and wholly placed himself and his possessions on God’s altar for service.

Every soul is a sanctuary, and its true history can, at best, only be known in part by others. ‘The secret things belong unto the Lord our God; but the things that are revealed belong unto us and to our children for ever.’ That so much can be revealed of the inner history of Archibald Orr Ewing’ s life is due to the wealth of material placed at the writer’s disposal…

Page vii.

James Gilmour and His Boys

James Gilmour and His Boys

The “Boys” of the title are James Gilmour’s two sons, James and Willie. They had been sent back from China to England to school after the death of their Mother. This book is a selection of James Gilmour letters to them.

My thanks to Redcliffe College for providing a copy of this public domain title for digitisation.

Richard Lovett [1851-1904], James Gilmour and His Boys. London: Religious Tract Society, 1894. Hbk. pp.288. [Click to visit the download page]

Contents

  1. Introduction
  2. The Boyhood and Youth of James Gilmour
  3. Adventures in Central Mongolia
  4. Life And Work in Eastern Mongolia
  5. Second Visit to England, and Closing Years
  6. Last Days
  7. Pen-Pictures For Children, By Mr. Gilmour

Introduction

This volume is very different from all its forerunners in the New Year Gift Book Series; but I think the readers of it will find that it can well hold its own both in interest and in helpfulness with any of them. Some of those were biographies of great missionaries; some were descriptions of heathen children to whom your gifts were bringing the light and joy of the gospel; some were accounts of thrilling adventures and hard work done for Jesus Christ in North America, in New Guinea, in China, in India, in Mongolia, and in other distant parts of the earth.

The book is partly a biography, partly a series of adventures, partly a story of work done for Jesus Christ and of very hard trials bravely endured for Him and from love to sinful men…

page.9.

Your will find more material about James Gilmour here.

History of the Bible in China by Marshall Broomhall

Marshall Broomhall [1866-1937], The Bible in China

Marshall Broomhall provides a history of the translation of the forty versions of the Bible that were available in China by 1934. My thanks to Redcliffe College for providing a copy of this public domain title for digitisation.

Marshall Broomhall [1866-1937], The Bible in China. London: The China Inland Mission, 1934. Hbk. pp.190. [Click here to visit the download page]

Contents

  • Foreword
  • Our Obligations
  • By Way of Introduction

Part 1: The Bible in Preparation

  • Nestorian Pioneers
  • Under the Great Khans
  • In the Footsteps of Xavier
  • A New Force in Old China
  • Morrison and Marshman
  • The Delegates; Version
  • Gutzlaff and the Taiping Rebels
  • The People’s Bible
  • Unon Versions
  • Chinise Dialects
  • For the Tribes
  • The Scriptures in Manchu
  • Among the Mongols

Part 2: The Bible in Action

  • The Colporteur’s Task
  • The Colporteur’s Reward
  • Wise unto Salvation
  • The Power of the Word

Part 3: The Bible a Uniting Force

  • A Great Fellowship

Appendices

  • The Nestorian Tablet
  • List of Versions and Translations

Foreword

It is one hundred years since Robert Morrison died in China, and one hundred and twenty years since his Chinese translation of the New Testament was published. It is not unfitting that the centenary of Morrison’s death should see the remarkable story of the Bible in China published. It seems somewhat strange that this has not been done before. And now, by one of those unexpected coincidences which do occur, two records are being issued at the same time. On the very day on which we write this foreword-the whole book being finished-we have received from China a copy of the Rev. A. J. Garnier’s brochure of some eighty pages, entitled Chinese Versions of the Bible. Happily the two efforts do not clash.

Mr. Garnier’s concise pamphlet has been prepared, as his preface states, to be the basis of a Chinese Appendix to his translation of Professor G. Milligan’s The New Testament and its Transmission…

p.vii.

Behind the Ranges. Fraser of Lisuland S.W. China

James Outram Fraser [1886–1938]
 James Outram Fraser [1886–1938]
James Outram Fraser [1886–1938] was an English missionary who divided his time between China and Burma, working amongst the Lisu people who lives along the border. He worked on translating the New Testament in the Lisu language and established churches that were both funded and led by the Lisu converts.

My thanks to OMF International (UK) for their permission to place this in-copyright book on-line. It may be downloaded and used for free educational purposes, but may not be sold for profit without written permission from the copyrgiht holder. My thanks to Book Aid for making a copy available for digtisation.

Mrs Howard Taylor (aka. Mary Geraldine Guinness [1865-1949], Behind the Ranges. Fraser of Lisuland S.W. China. London & Redhill: Lutterworth Press & China Inland Mission, n.d. Hbk. pp.253. [Click to visit the download page]

Contents

  • Foreword
  1. Beginnings
  2. Young Life
  3. The Real Issue
  4. Mountain Men
  5. Missionary in Charge
  6. Banished to Burma
  7. Lisuland Again
  8. A Challenge
  9. A Decision
  10. Powers of Darkness
  11. A Fruitful Interlude
  12. The Prayer of Faith
  13. The Sword-Ladder Festival
  14. ‘Who Teacheth Like Him ?’
  15. The Letter Never Written
  16. ‘I Sent You To Reap’
  17. Love and Patience
  18. Blood of His Own
  19. A New Call
  20. ‘Good Ground’
  21. ‘A Hundredfold’
  22. The End in View
  23. Love’s Endurance
  24. Love’s Reward
  25. Marriage and Wider Ministry
  26. Fulfilment and Translation
  • Farewell

Study of World Evangelisation by David Jenks

The title explains sufficiently the scope of his book. It does not attempt to be a history of evangelisation, still less to be a history of modern missions. It is a study of evangelisation in relation to general history, a study in the way in which God speaks through history.

From the Preface
David Jenks [1866-1935], A Study of World Evangelisation.

My thanks to the Cambridge Centre for Christianity Worldwide for making a copy of this public domain title available for digitisation.

David Jenks [1866-1935], A Study of World Evangelisation. London: Student Christian Movement, 1926. Hbk. pp.168.

Contents

  • Preface
  1. The First Three Centuries
  2. The Decay of the Roman Empire
  3. Christian Monasticism
  4. Eangelisation mainly outside the Roman Empire (fourth to seventh century)
  5. The Conversion of the British Isles
  6. The Rise of Mohammedanism
  7. The Conversion of Central Europe
  8. The Crusades
  9. Evangelisation from the Ninth Century
  10. The New World
  11. The early Jesuit Missions
  12. The Struggle for the New World (first phase)
  13. North America and the French Missions
  14. The Struggle for the New World (second phase)
  15. The Beginning of Protestant Missions
  16. The Present Time
  17. The Modern Evangelisation of India
  18. Africa
  19. The Far East
  20. The Islands of the Pacific
  21. The Mohammedan World
  22. The Measure of the Task
  • Notes
  • A Short List of Dates
  • Bibliography
  • Index

Chapter 1: The First Three Centuries

1. “The Acts of the Apostles” is the earliest Church History, the forerunner of Eusebius and Bede and Burnet and others who have written of their own times. St Paul’s letters form the first missionary correspondence. One cannot point to a date when the New Testament times ended and ordinary Church history began; miracles did not cease on the death of the last Apostle, nor was St Paul supernaturally aided by a gift of foreign languages. A study of the evangelisation of the world passes imperceptibly from the days of the Apostles, through the extension of the Church in the Roman Empire and beyond, until one comes down to the modern societies with their staffs of expert workers. In one continuous enterprise from the Day of Pentecost until to-day the Holy Spirit in the Body of Christ on earth has manifested His power.

Pastor Hsi. Confucian Scholar and Christian by Geraldine Taylor

Pastor Hsi (Xi Shengmo)
Pastor Hsi (Xi Shengmo). Source: Wikipedia

Thanks largely to this book, there is more written about Pastor Hsi (Xi Shengmo) than any other 19th protestant Chinese Christian.  Hsi is notable for the way that he, rather than western missionaries, led the work of establishing churches and clinics for opium users in the areas where he worked.

My thanks to OMF International-UK for their permission to digitise and host this important book. It may be downloaded and used for free educational purposes, but not sold for profit without the explicit written permission of the copyright holder.

Geraldine Taylor [1865-1949], Pastor Hsi: Confucian Scholar and Christian, 23rd edn. London: China Inland Mission, 1900. Hbk. pp.293. [Click to visit the download page]

Contents

  • Editorial Note
  • Foreword
  • Introduction
  • Extracts from the Introduction written for the first edition by D.E. Hoste
  1. The Home of His Childhood
  2. Wedding an Unknown Bride
  3. Winning a Reputation
  4. The Swift Descent
  5. Dark Days in Shansi
  6. Light at Last
  7. Fishers of Men
  8. Drawing in the Net
  9. The Living Christ
  10. Stronger than All the Powers of the Enemy
  11. Called to Life Service
  12. The Great Change
  13. “Conqueror of Demons”
  14. Early Success and Failure
  15. Growing in Grace
  16. Starving the Village Idols
  17. Under-Shepherds: A Problem
  18. Light on the Problem
  19. Finding His Life-Work
  20. A Visit to the Capital
  21. How the Work Spread
  22. How God Provided
  23. A Fresh Advance
  24. Reinforcements
  25. Not Against Flesh and Blood
  26. For the Work of the Ministry
  27. West of the River
  28. A Winter’s Work at Hungtung
  29. Through Fire and Through Water
  30. A Wealthy Place
  31. The Burden and Heat of the Day
  32. The Refuges as Mission Stations
  33. The Middle Eden
  34. Ready to Depart
  35. Higher Service
  • Hymn by Pastor Hsi

History of Protestant Missions in India from 1706 to 1881

Matthew Atmore Sherring [1826-1880] & Edward Storrow [1818-1907], The History of Protestant Missions in India from their Commencement in 1706 to 1881This would appear to be a very significant work for those interested in early missionary work in India. It covers all of the major mission agencies involved from 1706 to 1881 and summaries the progress that had been made by the end of that period.

My thanks the Cambridge Centre for Christianity Worldwide for providing a copy of this book for digitisation. The title is in the public domain.

Matthew Atmore Sherring [1826-1880] & Edward Storrow [1818-1907], The History of Protestant Missions in India from their Commencement in 1706 to 1881. London: Religious Tract Society, 1884. Hbk. pp.463. [Click to visit the download page]

Contents

  • Preface
  1. Protestant Missions in India During the Eighteenth Century
  2. Missions in Calcutta and its Vicinity
  3. Missions in Bengal, Excluding Calcutta and its Vicinity
  4. Missions Among the Kols and Santals
  5. Missions in the North0-Western Provinces, Oudh, and Rohilkhand
  6. Missions in the Punjab
  7. Missions in Central India, including Rajpootana, Holkar’s Country,the Central Provinces, the BErars, and the Nizam’s Dominions
  8. Missions in the City and Presidency of Bambay
  9. Missions of Basle Evangelical Society in the Southern Marathi Country, Canara, and Malabar
  10. Missions in Bellary and the Mysore
  11. Missions of the Church Missionary Society in North Travancore and Cochin
  12. Missions of the London Missionary Society in South Travancore
  13. Missions of the Church Missionary Society, and of the Society for the Propagation of the Gospel in Foreign Parts, in the Province of Tinnevelly
  14. Missions in the Province of Madura, of the American Board of Commisioners for Foreign Missions, and of the Society for the Propagation in Foreign Parts
  15. Missions in Tanjore, Trichinopoly, Coimbatore, and the Neelgiris
  16. Missions in the Provinces of Arcot and Salem
  17. Missions in the City of Madras an its Vicinity, including the Province of Chingleput
  18. Missions in the Provinces of Cuddapah, Kurnool, and Nellore
  19. Missions in the Kistna abd Godavery Districts, and in Vizagapatam and Ganjam
  20. Summary of the Agencies and Results of Protestant Missions in India
  • Appendix A
  • Appendix B
  • Index

Preface

The aim of this work is to show historically what Protestant Missions have accomplished in India since their commencement in the beginning of the last century. In pursuance of this object, I have collected together all the important events of these Missions, and have presented them in a succinct and consecutive narrative, thus striving to give a complete view, as in a panorama, of their operations and achievements. Notwithstanding the numerous reports which have been £or many years issued by missionaries concerning their respective fields of labour, it has hitherto been well-nigh impossible to gain an adequate and distinct conception of the wonderful work which has been accomplished in the evangelization of the people of India. While leaving matters of unnecessary detail, I have endeavoured to furnish an outline of the various methods, plans, and projects which have been pursued in the formation and growth of the Indian Protestant Church, sufficiently minute to be correct, and yet so compacted together and interwoven as to suffer neither in unity nor comprehensiveness….