Pioneering for Christ in the Sudan – Johanna Veenstra

Johanna Veenstra [1894-1933], Pioneering for Christ in the SudanJohanna Veenstra tells the story of her life of service in Africa. Note that Sudan at that time referred to huge tract of land stretching across the centre of Africa and not just the boundaries of the modern nation of that name. There are a number of unique photographs contained in this volume which I have attempted to reproduce as clearly as possible. My thanks to Redcliffe College for providing me with a copy of this book to scan. This title is in the public domain.

Johanna Veenstra [1894-1933], Pioneering for Christ in the Sudan. London & Edinburgh: Marshall Brothers Ltd., [1926]. Hbk. pp.190. [Click to download in PDF]

Contents

Farewell
The Call to Service
Preparation for Service – I
Preparation for Service – II
“In Journeyings Often…”
The Call of the Sudan
Getting Acquainted
Entering the Cannibal District
The Power of Spirit Worship
The Moral Life of the Dzompere
“In Perils in the Wilderness – I”
“In Perils in the Wilderness – II”
The Task of a Pioneer Missionary
The Dispensary Work of Lupwe
The Boarding School at Lupwe
Evangelistic Work
First Fruits
The First Convert From Among the Dzompere
“Suffer the Little Children to Come”
A Few Questions Answered
Problems and Difficulties
“Is it Nothing to You?”

Preface

When coming home for this second furlough, there was not even a remote desire in my heart to write a book and tell of my experiences during five years of service in the Dark Continent; I have never thought myself capable of performing such a task; and even now I hesitate to set this work before the public.

One day this summer our kind Director of Missions, Dr. H. Beets (Christian Reformed Church), approached me on this subject of writing a book. At first his suggestion made no impression whatsoever upon my mind. Later on I was confronted with the fact that I was compelled to refuse many invitations to speak in the different churches and tell of the Lord’s work in the Sudan. For lack of time it became impossible to travel about in so many states of the Union and in Canada, to reach all the people interested in the spread of the gospel in this needy field. A physical complication – overstrain of the vocal cords – also forced me to limit the amount of speaking appointments. [Continue reading]

 

Missions in South America From Cape Horn to Panama

Robert Young, From Cape Horn to Panama. A Narrative of Missionary Enterprise Among the Neglected Races of South America, by the South American Missionary Society, 2nd edn.This is an official record of work undertaken by the South American Missionary Society up to 1905, beginning with an account of the ministry of Captain Allen F. Gardiner [1794-1851]. My thanks to Redcliffe College for providing a copy to scan. This book is in the public domain.

Robert Young, From Cape Horn to Panama. A Narrative of Missionary Enterprise Among the Neglected Races of South America, by the South American Missionary Society, 2nd edn. London: South American Missionary Society, 1905. Hbk. pp.212. [Click to download complete book in PDF]

Contents

  1. Captain Allan F. Gardiner, R.N.
  2. Hope Deferred, Not Lost
  3. A Chapter of Disasters
  4. Further Disasters
  5. The Turning of the Tide
  6. Opening of Mission Stations on the Islands
  7. The Darkness Passing Away
  8. Among the Patagonians
  9. Evangelistic Work – Chaplaincies – Seamen’s Missions
  10. Among the Indians of the Paraguayan Chaco
  11. Among the Mapuché Indians of Araucania
  12. Among the Tribes and Romanists of Brazil
  13. The Isthmus of Panama

Concluding Remarks
Appendix
Index

Prefatory Note to the First Edition

In the year 1895, the author wrote a series of articles in The Mission World under the general title of “The Land of Fire,” giving the pathetic history of the Fuegian or Patagonian Mission, begun by Captain Alien F. Gardiner. These articles, which excited a good deal of interest at the time, form the substance of the following volume. At the request of the Committee of the South American Missionary Society, the whole has been carefully· revised, extended, brought up to date, and cast into the form of a book. Any value attaching to it is due mainly to the remarkable events it records. [Continue reading]

History of Christianity in Japan

Herbert Moore [1863-1943], The Christian Faith in JapanThis book is a history of the growth of the church in Japan, focusing on the work of the Society for the Propagation of the Gospel in Foreign Parts. My thanks to Redcliffe College for providing me with a copy of the book to scan. This title is in the public domain.

Herbert Moore [1863-1943], The Christian Faith in Japan. Westminster: The Society for the Propagation of the Gospel in Foreign Parts, 1904. Hbk. pp.151. [Click to download complete book in PDF]

Contents

  1. The Country
  2. The People
  3. The Years That Are Past
  4. The Awakening of Japan
  5. Buddhism in Japan
  6. Shinto
  7. The Heritage of the Ages
  8. Re-Laying the Foundations of the Church
  9. S.P.G. Work in Tokyo
  10. S.P.G. Work in Kobe
  11. The Edifying of the Body of Christ
  12. S.P.G. Work in Towns and Villages
  13. The More Distant Work of the Japan Church
  14. Things That Hinder
  15. Things That Help
  16. Looking Forward

Index

Prefatory Note

The aim of this little volume is not to give a complete account of missionary work in Ja pan, still less to provide a general description of the country or the people, but to afford to the general reader a sufficient introduction to both to enable him to appreciate the work which the ‘Holy Catholic Church of Japan’ has already accomplished, and its prospects of development in the immediate future. By far the greater number of professing Christians in Japan at the present time are attached to the Russian or the Roman Missions or to Missions started by various Non-conformist Bodies. It is from no desire to create a false impression of the importance, from a numerical standpoint, of the Japan Church that a detailed account of these other Missions has been omitted. The omission is simply due to exigencies of space. The Rev. Herbert Moore, to whom the Society is indebted for writing this account of its work, was a member of the St. Andrew’s Brotherhood, Tokyo, from 1891 to 1895 and was afterwards a missionary at Kobe for two years. [Continue reading]

Church Planting in Madagascar

William Kendall Gale [1882-1935], Church Planting in MadagascarWilliam Kendall Gale [1873-1935], who served with the London Missionary Society (LMS), was well qualified to write on the subject of church planting in Madagascar, having established over 200 churches in that country. This book is a compilation of his articles previous published in Word Dominion magazine. My thanks to Redcliffe College for providing me with a copy of the book to scan. This title is in the Public Domain.

William Kendall Gale [1882-1935], Church Planting in Madagascar. London: World Dominion Press, 1937. Pbk. pp.88. [Click to download complete book in PDF]

Contents

Foreword by Dr. Thomas Cochrane

  1. A Cry as of Pain
  2. The People in Darkness
  3. A Door Flung Wide
  4. Tackling the Problem
  5. The Unknown God
  6. Opening a Window
  7. Seeking a Leader
  8. Watering the Seed
  9. The Village of the Emaciated Gogo
  10. William Kendall Gale – The Man and His Work by Harold A. Ridgwell

Foreword

This book has been compiled from articles contributed to World Dominion from time to time by my beloved and lamented friend William Kendall Gale. He and I had many talks together, and much correspondence, on missionary principles.

We of the World Dominion Movement are in touch with an ever-increasing number of missionaries in many parts of the world, who stand for missionary methods which we have advocated for many years, viz., widespread evangelism, with a view to the formation of indigenous churches which, from their inception, shall be self-governing, self-propagating and self-supporting, and which shall undertake the task of the continuous evangelization of their own neighbourhood. William Kendall Gale was one of the best advocates, by pen and in practice, of these methods. In him the London Missionary Society, with which I am proud to have been associated, has the honour of adding to its heroic roll one of the greatest missionaries of modern times.

His was truly an apostolic ministry. He founded over two hundred Christian churches in Madagascar. If every missionary could have the success which Kendall Gale achieved, the world’s mission fields would soon have enough indigenous churches to inaugurate the post-missionary era.

THOMAS COCHRANE.

(Editor of World Dominion)

Livingstone and the Exploration of Central Africa

Sir H.H. Johnston [1858-1927], Livingstone and the Exploration of Central AfricaDavid Livingstone [1813-1873], pioneer medical missionary and explorer is probably the best known of Victorian missionaries. This biography is a “cheap edition” of a volume that originally appeared as part of a series about the world’s greatest explorers and was republished in this format to mark the centenary of Livingstone’s birth. My thanks to Redcliffe College for providing me with a copy to digitise. This book is now in the public domain.

Sir H.H. Johnston [1858-1927], Livingstone and the Exploration of Central Africa. London: George Philip & Son, Ltd., 1912. Hbk. pp.372. [Click to download complete volume in PDF]

Contents

Publisher’s Note

  1. Central Africa – Natural History
  2. Central Africa – Human History
  3. The Hour and the Man: Livingstone’s Upbringing
  4. First Impressions of the Missionary Life
  5. Marries, Teaches, and is Troubled
  6. The Boers, “God’s Chosen People”
  7. Mission-Work; Its Failures and Successes
  8. Missionary Becomes Explorer
  9. Betshuanaland
  10. Fever, Tsetse-Fly, and Horse-Sickness
  11. From the Zambesi to Angola
  12. From Loanda to Quilimane – Across Africa
  13. The Zambesi
  14. Livingstone Returns to England
  15. The Second Zambezi Expedition
  16. Last Visit to England
  17. Four Great Lakes and a Mighty River
  18. The Manyema and Their Land
  19. Stanley Relieves Livingstone
  20. The Death of Livingstone

Chapter 1: Central Africa – Natural History

The history of the southern half of the African continent has widely differed from the northern portion as regards the manner and period in which it has been explored and made known by rates higher than the Negro. More than that, the Negroes inhabiting the long half of the Dark Continent which lies to the south of an irregular border-line commencing at the Cameroons of the West Coast, and passing across the continent to the East Coast at Mombasa, present two very distinct language-stocks, which are totally unrepresented in the northern half of Africa For convenience, I shall call this line dividing Northern from southern Africa the “Bantu Border line,” because it coincides exactly ·with the northern limit of the Bantu language-field. [Continue reading]

Missionary Joys in Japan – Paget Wilkes

Paget Wilkes [1871-1934], Missionary Joys in Japan or Leaves From My Journal. Paget Wilkes [1871-1934] was one of the co-founders of the Japan Evangelistic Band in 1903. This book contains extracts from his diary from his tour of Japan in 1910. According to Wikipedia:

The work of the JEB… has led to the establishment of the Kansai Bible College in Kobe and over 150 churches in Japan.

My thanks to Redcliffe College for providing a copy of this book to scan. This book is now in the public domain.

Paget Wilkes [1871-1934], Missionary Joys in Japan or Leaves From My Journal. London: Marshall, Morgan & Scott Ltd., 1913. Hbk. pp.321. [Click to download complete book in PDF]

Contents

Introduction

  1. London to Japan
  2. Floods
  3. More Floods
  4. “Life in the Lost”
  5. Country Missions
  6. A Peep into the Factories
  7. A Tour South
  8. A Visit to Korea
  9. At a Japanese Exhibition
  10. Here and There
  11. Sunshine and Shadow
  12. With the Children
  13. More Country Missions
  14. A Tour North
  15. A Glimpse of Difficulties
  16. Light and Darkness
  17. Higher Criticism and the Mission Field

Preface

During some fifteen years of missionary life in Japan, I have sent home letter-leaves from my Journal.

Friends have urged me to give them a wider circulation; and so after much misgiving I have consented, hoping that my readers will remember the haste in which they have been written. This volume, then, is a journal describing the work of a commonplace missionary; the line of service resembles what is known in England as that of a Special Missioner.

I have endeavoured to select incidents representing a variety of Christian activities, though all of an evangelistic order- Open-air Preaching, Tent Meetings at Exhibitions, Conventions for the deepening of Spiritual Life, Missions at Schools, Country Itinerating, Personal Dealing, and Testimonies of Salvation from all sorts and conditions of men. I ought perhaps to say a word about the insertion of the verses which preface each chapter.  [Continue reading]

Missionary Heroes of Africa – a Book for Children

Sarah Geraldina Stock [1839-1898], Missionary Heroes of AfricaSarah Stock’s book for children on the Missionary Heroes of Africa provides a summary of the lives of many of the men and women who served on that Continent. It is heavily illustrated in pen and ink, so I have tried to reproduce these images in greyscale. Sadly the title-page seems to be missing and some pages were badly foxed. My thanks to Redcliffe College for providing me with a copy to scan. This book is in the public domain.

Sarah Geraldina Stock [1839-1898], Missionary Heroes of Africa. London: London Missionary Society, 1898. Hbk. pp.204. [Click to download book in PDF]

Contents

Preface

  1. A Talk about Heroes and Africa
  2. The First Heroes of South Africa
  3. Heroes of Sierra Leone
  4. The Hero of Bechuana Land
  5. Heroes of East Africa
  6. The Hero of Central Africa
  7. Heroes of the Shiré Highlands
  8. Heroes of the Niger
  9. Heroes of Zanzibar and Nyassa Land
  10. The Hero of Garenganze
  11. The Little Hero of Tanganyika
  12. Heroes of the Congo
  13. Heroes of Uganda (Part I.)
  14. Heroes of Uganda (Part II.)

A Closing Word

Chapter 2: The First Heroes of South Africa

I daresay you have often heard people talk of going to “the Cape.” The voyage thither is a very pleasant trip, and the air at the Cape is very healthy, so that weak and sickly people who go out there soon get strong again. But what is ”the Cape “? It is part of South Africa which belongs to the English, and has become an English colony. It was not the English who first discovered if. Three hundred years ago some Portuguese, sailing along the coast, came to a rocky headland jutting out into the sea. They called it first the “Stormy Cape,” but afterwards the name was changed to the “Cape of Good Hope,” because by passing round it ships could get into the Indian Ocean, and India could be reached. And in those days ail the merchants wanted to trade with India.

About fifty years later some Dutch ships came to the Cape, and some Dutchmen landed in the beautiful bay called Table Bay below the flat-topped Table Mountain. There they built a fort, and settled down to trade with the natives round about. [Continue reading]

Sixty Years of Ministry to Lepers

Anonymous, Sixty Years of Service 1874-1934 on Behalf of Lepers and Their ChildrenThe Mission to Lepers – later known as The Leprosy Mission – was founded by Wellesley C Bailey. This book, published three years before Bailey’s death at the age of 91 – to which he contributed the foreword – recounts the mission’s history. My thanks to Redcliffe College for providing me with a copy of this book to scan. This title is in the Public Domain.

Anonymous, Sixty Years of Service 1874-1934 on Behalf of Lepers and Their Children. London: The Mission to Lepers, 1934. Hbk. pp.96. [Click to download complete book in PDF]

Contents

  • A Message from the Founder
  • Small Beginnings
  • Growth and Expansion (1874-1924)
  • Ten Year Onward (1924-1934)
  • Lengthening the Stakes – China
  • Breaking Forth – Africa
  • The Children Sat in a New Place
  • The Church Among the Lepers
  • Progress in Treatment for Leprosy, 1934-1934
  • America Contribution
  • Fields and Stations
  • The Missions Support
  • Co-operating Societies and Churches
  • Honorary Officers, Council, Secretaries, &c.

A Message from the Founder

It is to me a source of great thankfulness that I have lived to see the Diamond Jubilee of our beloved Mission and to take a part m the rejoicings, though I fear I shall not be able to be present at any of the special meetings to celebrate the event. Naturally, I look back, and my heart goes up in thankfulness and praise to God for His wonderful dealings with the Mission through all these sixty years. He has provided for its needs, never permitting us to close a year with a deficit. He has provided the workers for the various ministries that have been carried on, the ministry of comfort and help, the ministry of teaching and healing, and of saving the children from falling victims to the disease of their parents, and the giving of an outlook and. interest in life to those who had given up hope in anything. [Continue reading]

History of Christian Missions in Egypt

Charles R. Watson [1873-1948], Egypt and the Christian CrusDespite its somewhat unfortunate title, this book provides a helpful overview of Christian missions in Egypt before focusing on the work of the Presbyterian Church of North America. My thanks to Redcliffe College for providing me with a copy to digitise. This book is now in the public domain.

Charles R. Watson [1873-1948], Egypt and the Christian Crusade. Philadelphia, PA: The Board of Foreign Missions of the United Presbyterian Church of North America, 1907. Hbk. pp.288. [Click to download complete book in PDF]

Contents

Preface

  1. The Country
  2. The People
  3. History
  4. Religions
  5. Early Missionary Efforts
  6. United Presbyterian Mission
  7. Recently Missionary Work
  8. Mission Agencies
  9. Final Victory

Appendix I. Population
II. Occupations
III. Rules for Pronunciation and Spelling
IV. Statistics of Protestant Missions
V. Statistics of American Mission
Bibliography

Index

Preface

To write another book on Egypt, may seem venturesome when there are already in existence whole libraries dealing with the history of the country, its monuments, and its ancient religions; its present political condition, its people and their customs; not to speak of countless books of travel, recording the passing impressions of tourists who have spent from two weeks to two winters in the Nile Valley. It may seem especially daring to attempt to write another book, when in that book it is proposed to touch, though ever so briefly, on most of these great subjects and at the same time to limit the volume to less than three hundred pages.

Yet the justification for another book on Egypt can be found in two directions. In the first place, the very multiplicity of books on Egypt, dealing with special interests in that most interesting country, leaves room for a hand- book which shall undertake to give a comprehensive, if not a profound, view of the country and its people, without allowing that description to develop into a large volume. [Continue reading]

Karl Kumm’s Social and Natural History of the Sudan

Sudan in the 1900's from Kumm, The Sudan, p.19.To understand this book you will need to forget the borders of the modern nation of Sudan because, as the map above shows, in the 1900s “Sudan” referred to a much larger area. Karl Kumm’s work provides a wealth of background information about this region. My thanks to Redcliffe College for providing me with a copy to scan. This book is in the public domain.

H. Karl Kumm [1874-1930], The Sudan. A Short Compendium of Facts and Figures about the Land of Darkness. London: Marshall Brothers, [1907]. Hbk. pp.224. [Download complete book in PDF]

Contents

Introduction

  1. Welcome – White Man
  2. Where is the Sudan, and what is it?
  3. Who has Explored it?
  4. Who has Conquered it?
  5. A Crisis
  6. An Expedition of Investigation
  7. Up to Bautchi
  8. The Last Night at Pioneer Camp
  9. The Open Sore of Africa – Slave Raiding
  10. Only a Woman
  11. The Land of the Lions and Leopards
  12. What Grows in the Land? (Botany)
  13. What makes things grow? (Meteorology)
  14. The Water-ways (Hydrology)
  15. Where are we?

Addenda

Introduction

We were sitting in the little Cur bar church. Outside across the hayfields, the summer winds were blowing, and the big ox-eyed daisies nodded in the sun. Inside, the vicar’s well-known voice was reading morning service, and as he read one saw the scenes the Second Lesson pictured. The pillared aisle and Gothic windows of the church, through which one caught a glimpse of Derbyshire hills and meadows; gave place to inner vision, and we were far away in old Jerusalem.

Instead of organ, choir, and reading desk, one saw in thought the Temple court, the thronging crowds of people, the surging and the tumult of the Apostle Paul’s last day – last hour in that scene. The “Jews which were of Asia” have stirred up the whole city to cast out the man who teaches “all men everywhere” the news of the new King – CHRIST. Swarming from filthy alleys and up steep streets of steps, the rabble of the city has joined with Scribes and Pharisees in one wild howling outcry against Paul. [Continue reading]