Visit to All Nations Christian College

Visit to All Nations Christian College 1

Yesterday I had another chance to visit All Nations Christian College in Hertfordshire. Easneye Mansion was formerly the country home of the Buxton Family, and was designed the same architect as the National History Museum in Kensington. It now houses the largest specialist missiological library in Europe, with over 50,000 books and several hundred journals, some of which are very rare. Set within the grounds of a wooded estate it looks like a wonderful place to prepare for missionary work.

With more and more students wanting to study remotely the challenge the College faces is to make as many of the resources in the library as possible available online – which was the reason for my being invited. My thanks to the faculty and support staff for making this such a worthwhile visit.

You can read my interview with Dr Mark Galpin, All Nation’s head of postgraduate studies, here.

Christian Missions and Social Progress: A Sociology of Missions

James S. Dennis [1842-1914], Christian Missions and Social Progress. A Sociological Study of Foreign Missions, 3 Vols.

James S. Dennis’s seven Lectures on the Sociology of Christian Mission are notable for both their detail (they run to 1,629 pages!) and the huge number of photographs included in each volume. This presented some difficulties for digitisation and the file sizes of the downloads and larger than usual as a result.

My thanks to Redcliffe College for providing a set of these public domain books for digitisation.

James S. Dennis [1842-1914], Christian Missions and Social Progress. A Sociological Study of Foreign Missions, 3 Vols. Edinburgh & London: Oliphant Anderson & Ferrier, 1899. Hbk. pp.468+486+675. [Click here to visit the download page for these volumes]

Contents

Volume 1

  • Lecture 1: The Sociological Scope of Christian Missions
  • Lecture 2: The Social Evils of the Non-Christian World
  • Lecture 3: Ineffectual Remedies and the Causes of Their Failure
  • Lecture 4: Christianity the Social Hope of the Nations

Volume 2

  • Lecture 5: The Dawn of a Sociological Era in Missions
  • Lecture 6: The Contribution of Christian Missions toi Social Progress

Volume 3

  • Lecture 6: The Contribution of Christian Missions to Social Progress (continued)

Preface to Volume 1

The Students’ Lectures on Missions at Princeton Theological Seminary, which form the basis of the book now issued, were delivered by the author in the spring of 1896. The subject treated-” The Sociological Aspects of Foreign Missions “- was suggested to him by the students themselves, especially by members of the Sociological Institute and of the Missionary Society of the Seminary, with the special request that it be chosen for consideration. It has proved an absorbing and fruitful theme. The interest which it elicited was shown by requests from the faculties of Auburn, Lane, and Western Theological Seminaries to have the course repeated at those institutions after its delivery at Princeton. The lectures were limited to an hour each, but in preparing them for publication they have been recast, for the most part rewritten, and greatly expanded. This is especially true of the second lecture, and will be so in the case of the sixth, which will appear in the second volume…

p.vii

Robert and Louisa Stewart in Life and Death

Mary E. Watson, Robert and Louisa Watson. In Life and Death

Robert and Louisa Stewart were both born in ireland and served with the Church Missionary Society in China, where they died in the Kucheng Massacre of 1895. This book was written by Louisa’s sister and is the standard biography of the couple.

My thanks to Redcliffe College for making this public domain title available for digitisation.

Mary E. Watson, Robert and Louisa Watson. In Life and Death. London: Marshall Brothers, 1895. Hbk. pp.243. [This title is in the public domain]

Contents

  • Preface
  1. Some Reminiscences of Robert Stewart
  2. Ambassadors For Christ
  3. The Whirlwind
  4. The Joyful Sound
  5. Native Boys and Girls at School
  6. Christ Magnified
  7. “Possessions”
  8. Hands Clasped
  9. Strong Consolation
  10. “Called, and Chosen, and Faithful

Chapter 2

Various proposals have been made as to writing a Life of Robert and Louisa Stewart ; but they have all been declined.

Lives so truly lived in secret with God are not easy to record. And even if the attempt were successfully made, is there not a danger of exalting the human and losing sight of the fact that “all things are of God?”

It has been thought, therefore, that it is sufficient for God’s glory, to print some letters lately received, and supply a few details of the earlier times. Their letters were not kept, at Mr. Stewart’s earnest request.

Feeling that anything too personal would have been repugnant to the feelings of our dear brother and sister, we refrain from writing their biographies; but we know their wish would be that we should write and print anything that would awaken love and sympathy for China and the Chinese-anything that would show the friends who have helped through prayer and by their gifts that the need now is not less, but greater….

Pages 17-18.

Leprosy Mission in India, Japan & China

John Jackson [1853-1917], In Leper-Land. A Record of 7,000 Miles among Indian Lepers, with a Glimpse of Hawaii, Japan, and China

This is John Jackson’s record of his 7,000 mile tour (in about 1900) through India, China and Japan on behalf of the Mission to Lepers, now The Leprosy Mission.

My thanks to Redcliffe College for providing a copy of this public domain book for digitisation.

John Jackson [1853-1917], In Leper-Land. A Record of 7,000 Miles among Indian Lepers, with a Glimpse of Hawaii, Japan, and China. London: The Mission to Lepers, [1914]. Hbk. pp.208. [Click here to visit The Leprosy Mission page for the download link for this book and related titles]

Contents

  1. Bombay
  2. Pui and Poladur
  3. Nasik
  4. Wardha and Raipur
  5. Chandkuri
  6. Mungeli
  7. Purulia
  8. Purulia (continued)
  9. Asansol
  10. Raniganj and Bhangalpur
  11. Calcutta
  12. The Cry of the Children
  13. An Indian Snowstorm
  14. Almora
  15. Almora to Chandag
  16. Chandag Heights—The Place
  17. Chandag Heights—The Worker
  18. Chandag Heights—The Work
  19. Moradabad, Rurki, and Dehra Dun
  20. Saharanpur, Ludhiana, ad Ambala
  21. Tarn Taran
  22. Ramachandrapuram
  23. Sholapur, Poona, and Miraj
  24. A World Tour

Chapter 1

This volume is the record of a Tour extending to 7,000 miles of Indian travel and occupying a period of twenty weeks, exclusive of the voyages out and home. My primary purpose was to ascertain by personal observation the real condition of the lepers of India, and to obtain a direct insight into the work of ministering to their physical and spiritual needs. It was fitting, therefore, that my first visit to any place of public interest should be to the ” Homeless Leper Asylum,” as it is officially termed, at Matunga, Bombay. The drive of five miles through the city presented to my unfamiliar gaze more features of interest than one pair of eyes could apprehend. While trying to seize the points of a group full of life and colour on the right, figures and scenes of beauty or squalor, but picturesque in either case, were escaping me on the left….

page 15

Oxford Centre for Mission Studies Library

SS Philip and James Parish Church
SS Philip and James Parish Church. Source: OCMS Website.

This morning I took a short break from the BETH Conference to visit the Oxford Centre for Mission Studies, which is only 5 minutes walk from Wycliffe Hall in the former St Philips and St James Church on Woodstock Road. The Centre has a library of over 18,000 missions books and journals, which focuses “… on the Two-Thirds World (Africa, Asia, Oceania, Latin America) and cover both the Humanities (Theology, Biblical studies, Religious studies) and the Social Sciences (Anthropology, International Development, Diaspora/Refugee Studies, Research Methods).” [Source]

Library of the Oxford Centre for Mission Studies,taken from the upper gallery
Library of the Oxford Centre for Mission Studies,taken from the upper gallery

Despite the size of the church it is crammed with bookcases, which surround the study carrels.

Library of the Oxford Centre for Mission Studies,taken from the upper gallery
Library of the Oxford Centre for Mission Studies,taken from the upper gallery
Library of the Oxford Centre for Mission Studies
Library of the Oxford Centre for Mission Studies
Library of the Oxford Centre for Mission Studies
Library of the Oxford Centre for Mission Studies

If you are a serious student of Christian Missions then this library should certainly be on your list of places to visit.

From Japan to Jerusalem by Bishop Graham Ingram

E. Graham Ingram [1851-1926], From Japan to Jerusalem

Graham Ingram, the former bishop of Sierra Leone, was the Home Secretary on the Church Mission Society. In this book he records his eight months of travel during 1909-1910 to CMS mission stations across Japan, China, Israel anf Egypt.

A copy of this handsome and well illustrated public domain volume was kindly provided by Redcliffe College for digtisation.

E. Graham Ingram [1851-1926], From Japan to Jerusalem. London: Church Missionary Society, 1911. Hbk. pp.232. [Click to visit the download page for this title]

Contents

  • Introductory
  1. The First Stage
  2. On the Siberian Railway
  3. A Foreword on Japan
  4. In Japan—Osaka
  5. In Japan—Nara, Tokushima and Kyoto
  6. In Japan—The Hokkaido
  7. In Japan—Tokyo, Hiroshima, etc.
  8. In Japan—Kiu-Shiu
  9. A Foreword on China
  10. In China—Shanghai, Hang-chow and Shaou-hing
  11. In China—Ningpo and T’ai-chow
  12. In China—At Shanghai Again
  13. In China—Fuh-Kien Province
  14. In China—Fuh-Kien Province (continued)
  15. In China—Canton
  16. In China—Kong Kong
  17. A Foreword on India and Ceylon
  18. Ceylon
  19. In India—Tinnevelly
  20. In India—Madras, Calcutta and Nadiya
  21. In India—Benares and Allahabad
  22. In India—Lucknow, Cawmpore, Agra, Dehli and Peshawar
  23. In India—Lahore, Amritsar, Tarn Taran and Batala
  24. In India—Meerut, Nasik and Bombay
  25. A Foreword on Palestine and Egypt
  26. In the Holy Land—Jaffa and Jerusalem
  27. In the Holy Land—Nazareth and Lake of Galilee
  28. In Egypt—A Week in Cairo
  • Conclusion

Introductory

The story of eight months of 1909-10 spent on the frontiers of Christendom is now sent forth for general information. It is the story of a soldier spared for a short time from his base of operations to see how the battle fared at the front and to encourage the fighting line. The importance of this record arises from more reasons than one.

A great many people are now travelling. They are found on all the great roads–north and south and east and west. They see what they go to see. Many of them, like the present writer, feel it to be their plain duty to write a book on their return! The reader must judge as to whether the ordinary globe-trotter has met with phenomena such as the following pages show forth. Travellers are very much at the mercy of their guide books….

Page 1

Missionary Heroes of Asia by John C. Lambert

John C. Lambert [1857-1917], Missionary Heroes in Asia.

Six brief accounts of missionaries and their adventures in Asia, including James Gilmour, Jacob Chamberlain and George Leslie Mackay.

My thanks to Redcliffe College for providing a copy of this public domain title for digitisation.

John C. Lambert [1857-1917], Missionary Heroes in Asia. True Stories of the Intrepid Bravery and Stirring Adventures of Missionaries with Uncivilised man, Wild Beasts and the Forces of Nature. London: Seeley, Service Co Ltd., n.d. Hbk. pp.158. [Click to visit the download page for this title]

Contents

  • Introduction
  1. In the Steppes and Deserts of Mongolia [James Gilmour]
  2. In the Country of the Telugas [Jacob Chamberlain]
  3. A Japanese Romance
  4. “From Far Formosa” [George Leslie Mackay]
  5. A Heroine of Tibet
  6. “The Saviour of Liao-Yang”

Introduction

In a “foreword ” which he contributes to Dr. Jacob Chamberlain’s attractive missionary book, In the Tiger Jungle, Dr. Francis E. Clark expresses the opinion that one need not patronize sensational and unhealthy fiction to find stirring adventure and thrilling narrative, and then goes on to say:-

There is one source which furnishes stories of intense and dramatic interest, abounding in novel situations and spiced with abundant adventure; and this source is at the same time the purest and most invigorating fountain at which our youth can drink. To change the figure, this is a mine hitherto largely unworked; it contains rich nuggets of ore, which will well repay the prospector in this new field.”

The field to which Dr. Clark refers is the history of modern Christian missions. His meaning is that the adventurous and stirring side of missionary experience needs to be brought out, and emphasis laid upon the fact that the romantic days of missions are by no means past….

Page 9

Pearls From the Pacific by Florence Young

Florence Young
Florence Young [Frontispiece]

Florence Young [1856-1940] was born in New Zealand the daughter of Plymouth Brethren émigrés from England. She was sent back to England for her education and, following the death of her parents, she moved to Queensland, Australia. Deeply influenced by her Brethren upbringing, and by the teaching of the Keswick Convention, she began a work among the Melanesians in Queensland and later in the Solomon Islands. She was the founder of the Queensland Kanaka Mission (QKM), which became the South Sea Evangelical Mission (SSEM).

My thanks to Redcliffe College for making a copy of this public domain title available for digitisation.

Florence Selina Harriet Young [1856-1940], Pearls from the Pacific. London & Edinburgh: Marshall Brothers, 1925. Hbk. pp.256. [Click here to visit the Florence Young page for the download link for this title and other material about this remarkable lady]

Contents

  • Foreword
  1. Birth, 1856-1859, N.Z.
    Parentage
    Return To New Zealand, 1860-1865, N.Z.
    My Mother
    Invercargill and Victoria, 1866-1871, Vic.
    School in England, 1871-1874, Eng.
  2. From Darkness to Light, 1874, N.Z. 
    Sydney, England, and Continent, 1878-1881, Eng.
  3. Fairymead, 1882-1886,  Q’ld.
    Queensland Kanaka Mission, 1886-1887 Q’ld.
    England and India, 1888-1889, Eng. & India
  4. Call to China, 1890-1891, China
    Testing, 1891, China
    Yang-Chau and Kao-Iu, 1891-1892, China
    Gain After Loss, 1892, China
  5. Inland China, 1892, China
    Kuei-K’I, 1892, China
    Shang-Ts’ing, 1893, China
    Letters, 1893, China
    Ho’k’eo, 1893-1894, China
    Another Change, 1893-1894, China
    Ien-Shan, 1894, China
    Conflict, 1894,  China
  6. Return to Australia, 1894-1895, Aus, N.Z.
    “Not In Vain”, 1896, Q’ld.
    Back to China, An-Ren, 1897, China
    House Building, 1898-1899, China
    Boxer Outbreak, 1900, China
    England and Switzerland, 1901-1902, Eng., Switz.
  7. Progress in Queensland, 1899-1900, Q’ld.
    Further Testimonies, 1901-1903, Q’ld.
    North Queensland, 19012-1902, Q’ld.
  8. The Regions Beyond, 1900-1904, Sol. Islands
    Solomon Islands, 1904, Sol. Islands
    First Journey to Malaita, 1904, Sol. Islands
    Initiatory Difficulties, 1904, Sol. Islands
  9. The Spirit of Prayer in Queensland, 1905, 
    Second Journey to Malaita, 1905, Sol. Islands
    Revival in Queensland, 1906, Q’ld.
    The Year of Jubilee, 1906, Q’ld.
    Retrospect of Work in Queensland, 1882-1906, Q’ld.
  10. “Come Over and Help Us”, 1907, Sol. Islands
    Guadalcanar and Makira, 1908, Sol. Islands
    “Is Anything Too Hard For the Lord”, 1909, Sol. Islands
    Call Upon Me in the Day of Trouble”, 1909, Sol. Islands
    Sinorango, 1909, Sol. Islands
    “A Little Child Shall Lead Them”, 1909, Sol. Islands
    “Nobody Come Along You-Me”, 1909, Sol. Islands
    “The Terror By Night”, 1910, Sol. Islands
    “Behold I and the Children Which God Hath Given Me”, 1910, Sol. Islands
    “Rennell” Island, 1910, Sol. Islands
  11. The Martyr’s Crown, 1911, Sol. Islands
    England and Palestine, 1912-1913, Eng., Pales.
    “Do It With Thy Might”, 1913,  Sol. Islands
    “What I Do Thou Knowest Not Now”, 1913, Sol. Islands
    “Some Believed”, 1913, Sol. Islands 
    “She Loved Much”, 1913, Sol. Islands 
    The Lame Take the Prey”, 1913, Sol. Islands
    The Enduement of Power, 1914, Sol. Islands 
    Fellow Workers, Sol. Islands 
    “The Valley of the Shadow”, Sol. Islands
  12. The Ship and the School, Sol. Islands 
    Our Library, Sol. Islands 
    Baptisms, Sol. Islands 
    Sydney Office, Sydney 
    “Make Us All Intense For Thee”, 1924, Sol. Islands

Foreword

The following pages form a thrilling account of God’s work in the far off Islands of the South Seas, written by one whose own record of service is honourable and enviable. She tells the story of God’s grace with characteristic modesty and clear intention of ascribing all the glory of that which she recounts to Him. Christians in Great Britain know all too little of the work of the Kingdom in the more remote fields such as this one, of which these chapters tell. And thus to be brought face to face with the claim and challenge of such a story as is here unfolded cannot fail to bring the blessing of enlargement of heart and sympathy to every reader. For no privilege is more enriching than that of sympathetic and prayerful fellowship with those who are spending their treasure of life in Christ’s service on the furthermost frontier. Very heartily do I commend the perusal of what my friend, Miss Young, has written to the generous response and appreciation of the people of God in every land. They will surely read it with pleasure and profit; and rise with, I trust, newly strengthened desire to share to the utmost in all that the Lord of the Harvest is doing through His surrendered servants.

J Stuart Holden

Cobra’s Den and Other Stories of Missionary Work among the Telugas of India

Jacob Chamberlain [1835-1908], The Cobra's Den, and other stories of missionary work among the Telugus of India.

Jacob Chamberlain was a Medical Missionary from Connecticut who served in India amongst the Teluga people.

Chamberlain effectively used his medical and surgical work to open the way for Christian teaching. Considered one of the most enterprising of modern missionaries, he is credited in large measure for the marked success and rapid growth of the Christian church in India. His amazing experiences became the primary material for tracts and books.


Florence R. Scott, Evangelical Dictionary of Christian Missions, p. 172

My thanks to Redcliffe College for providing a copy of this public domain title for digitisation.

Jacob Chamberlain [1835-1908], The Cobra’s Den, and other stories of missionary work among the Telugus of India. New York / Chicago: Fleming H. Revell Co., 1900. Hbk. pp.270. [Click to visit the Jacob Chamberlain page for the download link to this book and other material]

Contents

  • Introductory
  1. The Cobra’s Den
  2. The Snake-Bitten Hindu’s Story
  3. The Angry Mob and the Story of the Cross
  4. The Surgeon’s Knife Dethrones a Hindu Idol
  5. Yes, or No? Instructions Wanted
  6. Those Torn-Up Gospels
  7. The Hindu Judge’s Opinion of the Bible
  8. Marketing the Bible
  9. A Medico-Evangelistic Tour
  10. Hinduism as It Is
  11. “Lord Ganésa” and Little Rámaswámi
  12. A Brahman’s Testimony
  13. A Daybreak Audience and a Chase for a Tiger
  14. The Spotted Tiger Foiled
  15. The Heat of India: How I Keep My Study Cool
  16. Oddities of Travel in India
  17. A Missionary Sanitarium
  18. How the “Cut” Cuts
  19. How Hindu Christians Give
  20. A Merchant of Means Join Us
  21. “Break Cocoanuts Over the Wheels”
  22. The Weaving of India Rugs or God’s Plans in Our Lives
  23. “Despondent Missionaries”
  24. The Change of Front in India
  25. Vernacular Preaching: Is it Ineffective?”
  26. A Unique Missionary Meeting on the Himálayas
  27. The Oriental “Bride of the Lamb”

Preface

The exceedingly kind reception given on both sides of the Atlantic, to “In the Tiger Jungle and Other Stories of Missionary Work among the Telugus” seems to indicate that such simple sketches of incidents in the life and work of any earnest, observant missionary have a place of some importance, in quickening the interest of both young people and older in all that pertains to the spread of the Kingdom, and that another collection of such sketches may not be out of place. Indeed, many urgent requests, from both friends and strangers, in Europe, Asia, and America, have been received, that at the earliest date another such collection should be issued. As these requests have come largely from acknowledged leaders in the church in the Home Lands, as well as from fellow-missionaries in different countries, and from Missionary Secretaries of many Societies and Boards, the call can no longer be left unheeded…Page 7

Strong Tower – an Account of the Nosu Church of Tibet by Marshall Broomhall

Marshall Broomhall [1866-1937], Strong Tower.

Marshall Broomhall wrote this book in order to make known the challenges that the Nosu Christians of Tibet were facing in the 1940s. My thanks to Book Aid for providing a copy of this public domain title for digitisation.

Marshall Broomhall [1866-1937], Strong Tower. London: China Inland Mission, 1947. Hbk. pp.256. [Click here to visit the download page for this title]

Contents

  • List of Illustrations
  • Introduction
  1. Vignette of a Nosu
  2. Early Days
  3. Country and People
  4. Background to Adventure
  5. Hand to the Plough
  6. New Horizons
  7. Plots and Perplexities
  8. The Heat of Day
  9. The Manager
  10. Scattered Outposts: I
  11. Scattered Outposts: II
  12. Bittersweet
  13. Weathering Storms
  14. Brief Interlude
  15. Terror by Night
  16. Hors De Combat
  17. Back to the Fray
  18. Hard Pressed
  19. Alarms and Excursions
  20. Cast Upon God
  • Epilogue
  • Historical Note
  • Glossary