In the Tiger Jungle – Jacob Chamberlain

Jacob Chamberlain [1835-1908], In the Tiger Country and Other Stories of Missionary Work Among the Telugus of IndiaJacob Chamberlain served for 37 years as a missionary to the Telugu people of India. This book records a number of his adventures. My thanks to Redcliffe College for providing me with a copy of the book to scan. This title is in the Public Domain.

Jacob Chamberlain [1835-1908], In the Tiger Country and Other Stories of Missionary Work Among the Telugus of India. New York: Fleming H. Revell Co., 1896. Hbk. pp.218.  [Download complete book in PDF]

Contents

Introduction by the Rev. F.E. Clark, D.D.
Preface, by the Author

  1. In the Tiger Jungle: Does God Hear Prayer?
  2. The Man with the Wonderful Books
  3. Encounter with a Ten-Foot Serpent, and its Results
  4. The Gospel River in India: How it Flows
  5. The Gospel River in India: The “Gospel in Song”
  6. The Gospel River in India: The Fleet-Footed Tract
  7. Establishing a New Station: Varieties in Mission Work
  8. Gospel Preaching Tours
  9. Gospel Preaching at Hindu Fairs
  10. Treated with a Shower of Stones
  11. A Fruitful Preaching Tour
  12. Our Village Cathedral
  13. The Building and Opening of a Free Reading-Room at Madanapalle
  14. A Brahman on the Bible
  15. The Village Magistrate’s Death
  16. Narasappa’s Mother; or, Christ’s Hidden Ones
  17. An Audience of Monkeys
  18. The Stick-to-it Missionary
  19. Unhatchable Ink-Bottles; or, Taught by a Hen
  20. Winding Up a Horse
  21. Baptism of a Brahman
  22. Bimgani Ramanna; or, Unreckoned Fruits
  23. The Margosa-Tree and the Hindu Temple

Preface

Urgent requests from many sources, some from personal friends, others from entire strangers, by letter and in person, that there might be issued in book form a collection of sketches and other articles which have appeared from my pen in a wide range of periodicals in America and other lands during the past years, have led me, on the eve of my return to India, to prepare such a collection, only to find that I had gathered far more material than should appear in one volume.

I have therefore selected a small portion of the material I had prepared, and present it in this volume. My selection may not always have been wise; in fact, I have not brought in one half of the articles that have been specially asked for, lest the book be so bulky as to be forbidding. That can, however, be remedied by the issue of another series, should it be called for. I have also in preparation a more pretentious work on India and the Hindus, which, if God spare my life, I hope to be able after a time to present to those interested in the Orient. [Continue reading]