History of Protestant Missions in India from 1706 to 1881

Matthew Atmore Sherring [1826-1880] & Edward Storrow [1818-1907], The History of Protestant Missions in India from their Commencement in 1706 to 1881This would appear to be a very significant work for those interested in early missionary work in India. It covers all of the major mission agencies involved from 1706 to 1881 and summaries the progress that had been made by the end of that period.

My thanks the Cambridge Centre for Christianity Worldwide for providing a copy of this book for digitisation. The title is in the public domain.

Matthew Atmore Sherring [1826-1880] & Edward Storrow [1818-1907], The History of Protestant Missions in India from their Commencement in 1706 to 1881. London: Religious Tract Society, 1884. Hbk. pp.463. [Click to visit the download page]

Contents

  • Preface
  1. Protestant Missions in India During the Eighteenth Century
  2. Missions in Calcutta and its Vicinity
  3. Missions in Bengal, Excluding Calcutta and its Vicinity
  4. Missions Among the Kols and Santals
  5. Missions in the North0-Western Provinces, Oudh, and Rohilkhand
  6. Missions in the Punjab
  7. Missions in Central India, including Rajpootana, Holkar’s Country,the Central Provinces, the BErars, and the Nizam’s Dominions
  8. Missions in the City and Presidency of Bambay
  9. Missions of Basle Evangelical Society in the Southern Marathi Country, Canara, and Malabar
  10. Missions in Bellary and the Mysore
  11. Missions of the Church Missionary Society in North Travancore and Cochin
  12. Missions of the London Missionary Society in South Travancore
  13. Missions of the Church Missionary Society, and of the Society for the Propagation of the Gospel in Foreign Parts, in the Province of Tinnevelly
  14. Missions in the Province of Madura, of the American Board of Commisioners for Foreign Missions, and of the Society for the Propagation in Foreign Parts
  15. Missions in Tanjore, Trichinopoly, Coimbatore, and the Neelgiris
  16. Missions in the Provinces of Arcot and Salem
  17. Missions in the City of Madras an its Vicinity, including the Province of Chingleput
  18. Missions in the Provinces of Cuddapah, Kurnool, and Nellore
  19. Missions in the Kistna abd Godavery Districts, and in Vizagapatam and Ganjam
  20. Summary of the Agencies and Results of Protestant Missions in India
  • Appendix A
  • Appendix B
  • Index

Preface

The aim of this work is to show historically what Protestant Missions have accomplished in India since their commencement in the beginning of the last century. In pursuance of this object, I have collected together all the important events of these Missions, and have presented them in a succinct and consecutive narrative, thus striving to give a complete view, as in a panorama, of their operations and achievements. Notwithstanding the numerous reports which have been £or many years issued by missionaries concerning their respective fields of labour, it has hitherto been well-nigh impossible to gain an adequate and distinct conception of the wonderful work which has been accomplished in the evangelization of the people of India. While leaving matters of unnecessary detail, I have endeavoured to furnish an outline of the various methods, plans, and projects which have been pursued in the formation and growth of the Indian Protestant Church, sufficiently minute to be correct, and yet so compacted together and interwoven as to suffer neither in unity nor comprehensiveness….

Twelve Mighty Missionaries by Esthme Ethelind Enock [1874-1947]

Esthme Ethelind Enock [1874-1947], Twelve Mighty MissionariesEsthme Enock’s biographical sketches of 12 famous missionaries has just entered the public domain. This copy was kindly provided by Book Aid for digitisation.

In the table of contents below I have linked to the bibligraphy pages on Missiology.org.uk, where you will find further material on each missionary.

Esthme Ethelind Enock [1874-1947], Twelve Mighty Missionaries. London: Pickering & Inglis, Ltd., 1936. Hbk. pp.95. [Click to visit the download page]

Contents

  1. Pastor Hsi, China
  2. James Chalmers, New Guinea
  3. Alexander Mackay, Uganda
  4. Anthony Norris Groves, India
  5. Alexander Duff, India
  6. John Williams, Erromanga
  7. Samuel Marsden, Maoriland
  8. Samuel Pollard, China
  9. Hudson Taylor, China
  10. C.T. Studd, Central Africa
  11. Dan Crawford, Central Africa
  12. Dr Richard Williams, Tierra Del Fuego

Chapter 1. Pastor Hsi, China

The exact date of Pastor Hsi’s birthday does not seem to be recorded, but he was born probably in the Autumn of 1836. Till he was seven years old the little Hsi lived the usual free life of the son of a Chinese scholar, and was encouraged in every way to be overbearing and self-willed. Then he was sent to school, a school where a shrine of Confucius occupied the place of honour. Here the boy begins the studies which, it is hoped, will make him a “Princely Man.”

But, favourable though circumstances are, they do not satisfy the heart of this boy. At the early age of eight years, as he wandered through the incense-filled Temple and gazed at the hideous idols and vivid representations of punishments and terrors beyond the grave, he would ask himself, what was the use of living. “Men find no good, and in the end—?” he said to himself….

Life and Letters of the Rev. Henry Martyn, B.D.

Henry Martyn
Henry Martyn. Image source: Wikipedia

This collection of the writings of Henry Martyn can be divided into three parts. The first two are selections from his journals and the third drawn from his account of a visit to Shiraz in Persia. My thanks to the Cambridge Centre for Christianity Worldwide for making this book available for digitisation. This title is in the public domain.

John Sargent [1780-1833], The Life and Letters of the Rev. Henry Martyn. London: Seeley & Co., 1885. Hbk. pp.463. [Click to visit the download page]

Contents

  • Preface
  • Preface to 10th Edition
  1. Early life of Henry Martyn – His successful academical career
  2. His advancement in piety – College employments – Decides on becoming a Missionary – His Ordination
  3. Commencement of his Ministerial labours-Collegiate Duties – Applies for a Chaplainship under the East India Company – Visits Cornwall – His sufferings on leaving England
  4. Departure from Eugland – Occurrences during his Voyage – At St. Salvador – And at the Cape of Good Hope – Arrives at Madras – And at Calcutta
  5. Mr. Martyn’s arrival at Calcutta – Residence at Aldeen – Preaches at Calcutta – Is appointed to Diuapore- Leaves Calcutta – Journal of his voyage up the Hoogly and Ganges
  6. Mr. Martyn is fixed at Dinapore – Commences his Ministry – Translations – Disputes with his Moonshee and Pundit – Difficulties respecting the Schools – His happiness in the work of Translation
  7. Mr. Martyn receives intelligence of the death of his eldest Sister – Letters to his friends – Is removed to Cawnpore – Hears of the death of his youngest Sister – Determines to visit Arabia and Persia -Leaves Cawnpore for Calcutta – Departs for Arabia
  8. Mr. Martyn leaves Bengal for Shiraz-Occurrences during his journey – Arrives at Shiraz – Commences a New Translation – Discussions with the Persian Moollahs
  9. First Public Discussion at Shiraz – Mr. Martyn replies to a Defence of Mohammedanism – Interview with the Head of the Soofies – Visits Persepolis – Translations – Discussions
  10. Mr. Martyn leaves Shiraz in order to lay before the King his Translation of the New Testament – Arrives at the camp – Is not admitted to an audience – Proceeds to Tebriz – Severe illness
  11. Mr. Martyn commences his journey homewards, by way of Constantinople – Visits Ech-Miazin – Suffers from fever – Dies at Tocat in Persia – View of his Character – Conclusion
  • APPENDIX: Letters to Miss Grenfell

For more resources on Henry Martyn, visit this page.

Deaville Walker’s Biography of William Carey

William Carey: Frontipiece
William Carey: Frontipiece

Walker’s biography of the great missionary pioneer William Carey [1761-1834] is based on the older works by J.C. Marshman (1859) and Eustace Carey (1836)., but adds new material from his own research. My thanks to the Cambridge Centre for Christianity Worldwide for making a copy of this title available for digitisation. This book is in th public domain.

F. Deaville Walker [1878-1945], William Carey. Missionary Pioneer and Statesman. London: Student Christian Movement, 1926. Hbk. pp.320. [Click to visit the download page]

Contents

  • Editorial Note
  • Author’s Preface
  1. Childhood in the Weavers’ Cottage
  2. Boyhood at the Village School
  3. The Shoemaker’s Apprentice
  4. Early Work as a Voluntary Preacher
  5. Moulton and the Missionary Call
  6. Leicester: Days of Trial and Conflict
  7. The Enquiry: Carey’s First Great Achievement
  8. The Formation of the Baptist Missionary Society
  9. Planning the Campaign
  10. Facing the Problems
  11. The Voyage to India
  12. India When Carey Landed
  13. Arrival in India: Dark Days
  14. Into the Wilderness
  15. Mudnabatty – Carey’s Second Apprenticeship
  16. Planning a Forward Movement
  17. A Refuge Under the Danish Flag
  18. A Wonderful Year At Serampore: The Mission Established
  19. Converts, Trials, and Progress
  20. Carey Becomes a College Professor
  21. Service for Humanity
  22. The Greatest Fight of All
  23. The Scriptures in Forty Languages
  24. Founding a College
  25. Sorrow Upon Sorrow
  26. Carey’s Private Life at Serampore
  27. “Not a Single Desire Ungratified”

Index

Author’s Preface

William Carey’s life-work falls into two distinct periods: the English period when, almost singlehanded, he faced and overcame the prevailing indifference and hostility to missionary effort, thought out a well-developed scheme, published his amazing “Enquiry,” and in the end almost compelled timid and hesitating men to form a Society for the evangelization of the world; and the Indian period, during which he put his ideas into practice, developing almost every form of missionary agency, translating the Scriptures into numerous languages, founding a splendid Christian college, and winning the confidence of one Governor-General after another. From being a simple shoemaker and village preacher, this man became so skilled a linguist that at the age of forty he was appointed Professor of Bengali, Sanskrit, and Marathi in the Governor-General’s college in Calcutta-a post he filled with distinction for thirty years…

For more material on William Carey, go here.

Christianity in the Eastern Conflicts by William Paton

William Paton [1886-1943], Christianity in the Eastern ConflictsIn preparation for the 1938 Oxford Conference on Christian Missions, William Paton the Secretary of International Missionary Council, embarked on a tour of Asia and the Near East. This volume represents a summary of his tour and its findings. My thanks to the Cambridge Centre for Christianity Worldwide for providing a copy of this book for digitisation.

William Paton [1886-1943], Christianity in the Eastern Conflicts. A Study of Christianity, Nationalism and Communism in Asia. London: Edinburgh House Press, 1937. Hbk. pp.224. [Click to visit the download page]

Contents

  • Author’s Preface
  • Introduction
  1. Japan
  2. China
  3. India
  4. The Near East
  5. The Gospel and the New Age
  6. Church, Community and State
  7. The Life and Witness of the Church
  8. The Church and the Social Order
  9. Conclusion
  • Book List
  • Index

Introduction

This book is based chiefly upon the experiences of a journey which it was my good fortune and privilege to undertake during the autumn, winter and spring of 1935-6. Travelling from England through America and Canada, during seven months I visited Japan, Korea, Manchuria, China, the Straits Settlements, Java, India, Egypt and Palestine. The principal object with which this journey was undertaken was to discuss with representative Christians of the indigenous Churches and with missionaries in the different countries the plans that had been outlined for holding in the Far East, in the autumn of 1938, a world meeting of the International Missionary Council, in succession to those held in 1910 at Edinburgh and in 1928 at Jerusalem. These plans were made in outline at the meeting of the Committee of the Council in Northfield, Massachusetts, and I left the meeting to go directly to Japan, there to begin an intensely interesting process of testing, in innumerable discussions, whether the themes which the Council had chosen as the subject-matter of its proposed World meeting were in fact the most important…

Missions and Modern History by Robert E. Speer

Robert E. Speer, Missions and Modern HistoryRobert E. Speer sets out his threefold purpose in writing this history of 19th Century missions:

  • To correct distortions of the facts;
  • To demonstrate the significance of missions in world events;
  • To inform the reading public of important recent events.

My thanks to the Cambridge Centre for Christianity Worldwide for making these volumes available for digitisation. These books are in the public domain.

Robert E. Speer, Missions and Modern History. A Study of the Missionary Aspects of Some Great Movements of the Nineteenth Century, 2 Vols. New York: Fleming H. Revell Company, 1904. Hbk. pp. 714. [Click here to visit the download page]

Contents

  • Preface
  1. The Tai-Ping Rebellion
  2. The Indian Mutiny
  3. The Religion of the Bab
  4. The Emancipation of Latin America
  5. The Development of Africa
  6. The Reform Movement in Hinduism 

    Second Volume 

  7. The Tong Hak Insurrection
  8. The Transformation of Japan
  9. The Armenian Massacres
  10. The Going of the Spaniard
  11. The Boxer Uprising
  12. The Coming of the Slav
  13. Missions and the World Movement
  • Index

Chapter 13: Missions and the World-Movement

Of the twelve great movements which have been considered, all but two have been related to Asia. We are often told that Asia is the immovable continent, that she is what she has been and that she will remain what she is, that “some strange fiat of arrest, probably due to mental exhaustion has condemned the brown men and the yellow men to eternal reproduction of old ideas,” that there notion and institution have hardened into permanency and that the continent must be regarded as alien to great moral or intellectual movements and separate from the stirrings of life that work ceaseless change in the West. How is it possible to reconcile such a view with the facts which have passed before us? These Asiatic nations are alive. The stock is not exhausted. “The theory that China’s dependence is due to the fact that she has long since reached maturity and has outlived the natural term of national existence does not hold good….

Mary Reed, Missionary to the Lepers

Mary ReedMary Reed [1854-1943] was an American missionary to India. Diagnosed with leprosy herself in 1891, she took this to be God’s guidance that she should work among the lepers of Chandag where she served for 52 years. Below are links to two titles on Mary Reed, both written within her lifetime. The first I am assuming to be still in copyright to The Leprosy Mission who are happy for my to make it available on-line. It may be used for free educational purposes, but not sold for profit without permission from the copyright holder. The second title is in the public domain. My thanks to Redcliffe College for providing copies of these books for digitisation.

E. Mackerchar, Mary Reed of Chandag, 5th edn. London: The Mission to Lepers, n.d. Pbk. pp.32. [Click to visit the download page]

John Jackson [1853-1917], Mary Reed: Missionary to the Lepers, 9th revd. & enlarged edn., 1908. London: Marshall Brothers, 1899. Hbk. pp.133. [Click to visit the download page]

Contents

  • Extract from Miss Reed’s Letter
  • Preface to the New and Enlarged Edition (the Ninth)
  • Introductory Words by Rev. F.B. Meyer
  1. Early Life
  2. Discovery and Decision
  3. The Way of the Cross
  4. Appointed to Chandag
  5. Among the Lepers
  6. Trials and Triumphs – 1894
  7. Praise and Progress – 1895
  8. A Welcome Visitor – 1895
  9. Travail of Soul – 1896
  10. Year by Year
  11. Christmas With the Lepers
  12. A Vision of the Night
  13. Divided Duties – 1897
  14. Light and Shade – 1898
  15. The Prayer of Faith – 1899

Appendix – Bringing the Narrative up to August, 1908.

History of the Church Missionary Society by Eugene Stock – 4 Vols

Eugene Stock [1836-1928], The History of the Church Missionary Society. Its Environment, Its Men and Its Work, 4 Vols. Eugene Stock’s comprehensive History of the Church Missionary Society runs to 2,740 pages and 4 Volumes. My thanks to the Cambridge Centre for Christianity Worldwide for providing a set of these volumes to scan. These titles are in the pubic domain.

Eugene Stock [1836-1928], The History of the Church Missionary Society. Its Environment, Its Men and Its Work, 4 Vols. London: Church Missionary Society, 1899-1916. Hbk. pp.504 + 659 + 912 + 665. [Click to visit the download page for this set]

Table of Contents, Volumes 1-3

  • Preface
  • Author’s Preface
  • Outline of the Work
  1. The Great Commission
  2. Missions Before the Reformation
  3. Missions After the Reformation
  4. The Eighteenth Century and the Evangelical Revival
  5. Africa and the East – Waiting
  6. The Missionary Awakening
  7. The New Society and its Early Struggles
  8. The First Missionaries
  9. Africa and India: Struggle and Victory
  10. Forward Steps
  11. Rousing the Country: The Associations
  12. C.M.S. and Other Societies
  13. Sierra Leone: The White Man’s Grave; The Black Man’s Life
  14. The Finished Course
  15. India: Entering the Opened Door
  16. Insular Missions: New Zealand, Ceylon, West India, Malta
  17. The Eastern Churches: Reports for their Revival
  18. The Outlook After Twenty-Five Years
  19. The Personnel of the Period
  20. The Environment of the Period
  21. India: Changes and Development
  22. India: Progress of the Missions
  23. The Negro on Both SIdes the Atlantic, Enslaved and Free
  24. Greek, Copt, Abyssinian, Zulu, Maori, Australian, Cree
  25. Henry Venn; And Survey of Men and Things
  26. The Society and the Church
  27. The Colonial and Missionary Episcopate
  28. New Zealand: The Bishop, the Colony, and the Mission
  29. New Enterprises in Africa: Niger Expedition, Yoruba Mission East Coast
  30. The Opening of China
  31. The Society’s Finances
  32. The Jubilee
  33. The Environment: Church Developments – Anglican
  34. The Environment: Church Developments – Evangelical
  35. The Society at Home
  36. Some Recruits from the Universities
  37. Islington College and its Men
  38. Church Organization: The Church of New Zealand
  39. West Africa: Three Missions and Three Bishops
  40. East Africa: The Missionaries and the Explorers
  41. Jerusalem and Constantinople: Jew, Turk, Christian
  42. India Under Dalhouse; and the Missions in the North
  43. India: The Missions in the South
  44. India: The Punjab – For England and For Christ
  45. India: The Mutiny – Its Victims and its Lessons
  46. India: The Great Controversy – Neutrality or Christianity?
  47. India: Missions After the Mutiny
  48. Ceylon’s Isle
  49. China: In Time of War and Tumults
  50. The Great Lone Land
  51. An Anxious Period: In the Society, and in the Church
  52. The Period: More Church Developments
  53. Salisbury Square
  54. Candidates of the Period
  55. The Native Churches: Self-supporting, Self-governing, Self-extending
  56. Ebb-Tide in Africa
  57. The Niger and its Black Bishop
  58. The Islands: Mauritius and Madagascar
  59. India: Rulers and Bishops of the Period
  60. India: Babus, Brahmos, Borderers
  61. India: Agencies Evangelistic and Pastoral
  62. India: Death and Life
  63. India: A Flag for Christ in the Punjab
  64. China: New Mission and Old
  65. The Land of the Rising Sun
  66. Lands of the Utmost West: Manitoba; Metlakahtla
  67. New Zealand: War, Apostasy, Fidelity
  68. Henry Venn’s Latter Days
  69. The Environment: Church Movements
  70. The Environment: Evangelistic and Spiritual Movements
  71. The Society: Missions, Men, Money
  72. The Society: Home Influence and Organization
  73. Africa: The Flowing Tide Again: Ilala – and After
  74. Uganda: The Call and the Response
  75. The Crescent and the Cross: Missions in Mohammedan Lands
  76. India: Dioceses of Calcutta and Bombay
  77. India: Diocese of Lahore
  78. India: Diocese of Madras
  79. India: The Hill Tribes
  80. India and Ceylon: The Bishops and the Society
  81. The Far East: Advance in China and Japan
  82. The Far West: The Church among the Red Indians
  83. The Epoch of 1880-82
  84. The Environment: Ecclesiastical, Controversial, Spiritual
  85. The Society A New Era of Progress
  86. Three Memorable Years. 1885, 1886, 1887
  87. Controversies Within and Attack from Without
  88. Recruits of the Period: Men and Women
  89. High Hopes and Sore Sorrows: West Africa and the Niger
  90. High Hopes and Sore Sorrows: East Africa and Uganda
  91. British East India; The Company, The Government, and the Missions
  92. India: The Men and their Work
  93. India: Some Features, Episodes, Incidents, and Controversies of the Period
  94. Lands of Islam: Egypt, Palestine, Arabia, Persia
  95. In the Indian and Southern Oceans: Ceylon, Mauritius, New Zealand
  96. China: Onward, Inward, – and Upward
  97. Japan: The Nation, the Mission, the Church
  98. The Red Indian Missions: Patterns of Zeal and Triumphs of Grace
  99. Missions at Congresses and Conferences
  100. Seven Years of the Policy of Faith
  101. The Church, the Society and the Cause
  102. The Society: Candidates, Controbutions, and the Three Years’ Enterprise
  103. The Four Years Abroad: Africa
  104. The Four Years Abroad: Asia
  105. In Memoriam
  106. Repice, Circumspice, Prospice

Christianity and the Asian Revolution

Rajah B. Manikam, editor. Christianity and the Asian RevolutionThis is a collection of articles about the “Asian Revolution”, that is, the political, economic, social and ideological changes that took place in East Asia in the 1930s, 40s and 50s.

This book is reproduced here by kind permission of the copyright holder, the World Council of Churches. My thanks to the Cambridge Centre for Christianity Worldwide for providing a copy for scanning.

Rajah B. Manikam, editor. Christianity and the Asian Revolution. India: The Joint East Asia Secretariat of the International Missionary Council and the World Council of Churches., 1954. Hbk. pp.293. [Click to visit download page]

Contents

  • Preface
  • Area and Population Chart

Section I: The Social Revolution in East Asia

  1. What is the Asian Revolution?
  2. The Political Situation
  3. Towards a Nw Economic Order
  4. The Changing Social Scene
  5. Contending Ideologies
  6. Christian Concern for the Asian Revolution

Section II: Resurgent Religions

  1. Patterns of Religious Resurgence in East Asia
  2. Resurgent Hinduism
  3. Buddhism on the March
  4. Islam Today
  5. New Religions in East Asia
  6. The Christian Approach to Non-Christian Religions

Section III: The Church in East Asia

  1. The Churches in the Asian Context
  2. The Churches at Work
  3. The Unfinished Task

Section III: The Church in East Asia

  1. Asian Churchmen Speak

Preface

The proposal to write this book was first discussed at the Ecumenical Study Conference for East Asia, held at Lucknow, India, in December 1952. The plan approved by the Conference was to issue an interpretative volume on “Christianity and the Asian Revolution” in preparation for the Second Assembly of the World Council of Churches. It was agreed that Christians in Asia should contribute articles to this volume, and, that it should be edited by the undersigned in his capacity as the Joint Secretary for East Asia of the International Missionary Council and the World Council of Churches.

In using the term ‘Asian Revolution’, we have had in mind much more than the political changes in East Asia during the past twenty-five years. Revolutionary developments have affected every aspect of Asian society. Political, economic, social and ideological changes are discussed in the first section of the book….

Centenary of the Baptist Missionary Society 1792-1892

John Brown Myers [1844/45-1915], editor, The Centenary Volume of the Baptist Missionary Society 1792-1892, 2nd edn.This is a detailed summary of the first hundred years of the Baptist Missionary Society with over 35 illustrations. These are included in greyscale to preserve their quality, which makes the download larger than usual. My thanks to Redcliffe College library for providing a copy of the book for digitisation. This volume is in the public domain.

John Brown Myers [1844/45-1915], editor, The Centenary Volume of the Baptist Missionary Society 1792-1892, 2nd edn. London: The Baptist Missionary Society, 1892. Hbk. pp.344. [Click to download complete book in PDF]

Contents

  • Holding the Ropes by Rev William John Henderson
  • India and Ceylon by Rev Samuel Vincent
  • China by Rev Ricahrd Glover
  • Africa by Rev Edward Medley
  • West Indies by Rev David Jonathan
  • East Europe by Rev William Landels
  • The Orissa Mission by Rev John Clifford
  • Bible Translation by Edward Bean Underhill
  • Appendix

Preface

The Committee of the Baptist Missionary Society publish this Volume on the hundredth anniversary of the existence of the Mission, with the prayerful hope that the perusal of these pages may excite fervent gratitude for past manifestations of Divine favour, and may lead to larger consecration, in view of the world-wide opportunities and urgent claims of the present day. If the century just closing furnishes, in the review of it, abundant occasion for encouragement, what will not the second century of modern missions, upon which we are now entering, witness, provided the Christian Church be faithful, expectant, and zealous l May every reader be prompted to inquire : “Lord, what wilt Thou have me to do?”

Whilst the occasion and scope of this publication do not permit the writers to make more than passing references to the work of kindred institutions, the Committee are not unmindful of the labours connected with other missions… [Continue reading]