John Thomas, First Baptist Missionary to Bengal

John Thomas (1757-1801)
Photo credit: Regent’s Park College, University of Oxford

Dr John Thomas [1757-1801] was a founding member of the Baptist Missionary Society and accompanied William Carey to India in 1793. Charles Bennett Lewis’s biography is one of the standard works on Thomas. The original from which this digital copy was made is held in Spurgeon’s College Library. This book is in the public domain.

Charles Bennett Lewis [1821-1890], The Life of John Thomas. Surgeon of the Earl of Oxford and First Baptist Missionary to Bengal. London: MacMillan & Co., 1873. Hbk. pp.417. [Click to visit the download page for this title]

Contents

  • Preface
  1. Mr Thomas’s Early Life—1757-83
  2. Calcutta in the Latter half of the Eighteenth Century
  3. Voyages to Calcutta and engagement as a Missionary—1783-87
  4. The First Year at Malda—1787-8
  5. Controversy and Disaster—1788-89
  6. Harla Gachi—1789-90
  7. Reconciliation and Return to England—1790-92
  8. Missionary Projects in Bengal
  9. The Baptist Missionary Society and its First Enterprise
  10. How the Lord made Room for His Servants, that they might dwell in the Land—1793-4
  11. Moypaldiggy—1794-7
  12. Having no certain dwelling-place—1797-9
  13. Serampore—1799-1800
  14. Cast down, but not destroyed—1799-1800
  15. Dinajpur and Sadamahal—1801
  16. Concluding Observations
  • Appendix

Call from India to the Church of England: A Report

Church of England Missionary Council, The World Call to the Church. The Call From India

This report was issued in 1926 as a wake up call to the Church of England to focus attention on the needs of the church in India. It includes a brief history of Anglican missions in India up to that date.

My thanks to The Cambridge Centre for Christianity Worldwide for providing a copy for digitisation.

Church of England Missionary Council, The World Call to the Church. The Call From India. London: Press and Publications Board of the Church Assembly, 1926. Hbk. pp.130. [Click to visit the download page]

Contents

  • General Preface
  • Bibliography
  • Foreword by Members of the Commision
  1. India and Its Peoples
  2. The Influence of British Rule
  3. Early History of the Christian Church in India
  4. Anglican Missions
  5. The Response of the Intelligentia to the Gospel
  6. The Response of the Caste People in the Villages
  7. The Response of the Aborigines
  8. The Response of the Outcastes
  9. The Lines of Advance
  10. Ceylon
  11. The Appeal to the Home Chuch
  • Appendix I. A Survey of Anglical Missionary Work in India According to Dioceses
  • Appendix II. The Indian Church Measure
  • Index

General Preface

A few words are necessary about the origin an.d purpose of these Reports.

Great movements, volcanic in their force and extent, are shaking the foundations and altering the whole aspect of human society. Old races are awakening, new races are tingling with adolescence; and the younger generation, everywhere ignorant, and untried though it be, is minded to take command. There is need everywhere of the guidance, and the constructive force which only the Christian Church can give. So we have thought and said for twenty years.

But the moment has come to face actual facts. If, as we believe, the times are making a new and unprecedented call upon the Church, it is high time that we knew accurately in terms of men and money what that call really is. It may be that the facts when known will themselves act with awakening power upon the Church. It may be that the young men and women when they see the God-given opportunity for adventure and sacrifice will not be ‘disobedient unto the heavenly vision,’ and a great movement of self-offering will be seen in our time such as the Church has never known hitherto. On the other hand, it may be that the Church will turn a deaf ear, that the seductive influences of comfort and the zest of domestic controversy may have paralysed her spirit. Whichever way it be, the Church of our generation is on its trial, and the opportunity before us is the tribunal before which we shall be judged. At all costs it is necessary that the whole Church should know the facts. It is the watchman’s duty to give the warning and sound the call to arms. When he has done that, the responsibility lies on the Church, and he has delivered his soul.

It was with these thoughts in our mind that we of the Missionary Council in January of this year laid before the accredited Missionary Societies our plan for a series of comprehensive Reports. We selected four great areas where we deemed the needs were most urgent; namely, Africa, India, the Far East, and Moslem lands, and we invited them to form with us four Commissions dealing with these areas. The response was unanimous and cordial, and since then, representatives of the Societies and other groups with specialized knowledge have given their time and experience unstintingly to the work.

Pages v-vi.

History of the Free Baptist India Mission

Fornt Cover: Mrs M.M. Hutchins Hills, Reminiscences. A Brief History of the Free Baptist India Mission

This history of the Free Baptist India Mission was published by the Free Baptist Women’s Missionary Society in Boston, Massachusetts in 1886. A sizable part previously appeared in this Society’s journal, the Missionary Helper. In April 1916 in merged with two other groups (Home Mission, and Foreign Mission) to become the Woman’s Baptist Mission Society. It is therefore an important book for those studying the role of women in Christian Missions.

My thanks to Redcliffe College for providing a copy of this public domain title available for digitisation.

Mrs M.M. Hutchins Hills, Reminiscences. A Brief History of the Free Baptist India Mission. Boston: F.B. Printing Establishment, 1886. Hbk. pp.336. [Click to visit the download page for this title]

Contents

  • Introduction
  1. Origin of the Mission 1832-1838
  2. First Permanent Station 1838-1840
  3. Second Permanent Station 1840-1842
  4. Death and Other Changes 1842-1846
  5. Depletion and Re-enforcement 1847-1850
  6. Progress of the Mission 1850-1852
  7. Another Re-enforcement 1852-1853
  8. Mrs. Phillips’s Return 1853-1854
  9. Mr. Phillip’s Return 1854-1855
  10. Bereavements in the Mission 1855-1857
  11. The Great Indian Mutiny 1857-1862
  12. Third Permanent Station 1862-1865
  13. Re-enforcements and Santal Schools 1865-1866
  14. Famine 1866-1867
  15. Zenana Work 1867-1869
  16. Brief Survey 1870-1885

Introduction

A portion of the pages of this volume was written for the Missionary Helper, organ of the Free Baptist Woman’s Missionary Society, under the heading, “Reminiscences of the Free Baptist India Mission.” An awakened interest to know something of the work of the early missionaries called for a continuance of these papers till they covered nearly twenty years. Meanwhile, requests came from India and from different sections at home that, for their permanent preservation, the papers be published together in book form. The Woman’s Board undertook the task, requesting the writer to continue her “Reminiscences” to the present time. A correspondence covering the entire life of the mission, assisted by recent India Reports, has made it possible to do this, though those relating to the later years of the mission are little else than a brief record of some of the leading events connected with the work. It was intended to present the portraits of all the early missionaries, but it was found in some cases impracticable to secure satisfactory pictures.

Page v.

Account of the Mission Tour of the Rev G.C. Grubb

Cover: Edward Candish Millard [1862-1900], What God Hath Wrought. An Account of the Mission Tour of the Rev G.C. Grubb, M.A. (1889-1890). Chiefly From the Diary Kept by E.C. Millard, One of His Companions in Ceylon, South India, Austrealia, New Zealand, Cape Colony

A collection was made at the 1899 Keswick Convention which paid for a Special Mission tour by the Rev. G.C. Grubb and three companions who travelled to Sri Lanka, South India, Australia, New Zealand and South Africa. The purpose of the tour was to visit and encourage the missionaries serving in those countries.

My thanks to Redcliffe College for providing a copy of this public domain book for digitisation.

Edward Candish Millard [1862-1900], What God Hath Wrought. An Account of the Mission Tour of the Rev G.C. Grubb, M.A. (1889-1890). Chiefly From the Diary Kept by E.C. Millard, One of His Companions in Ceylon, South India, Australia, New Zealand, Cape Colony. London: E. Marlborough & Co., [1891]. Hbk. pp.382. [Click to visit the download page for this title]

Contents

  • Preface
  1. London to Colombo
  2. Colombo anbd Districts
  3. Cotta
  4. Negombo and District
  5. Kandy
  6. Hatton and Nuwara Eliya
  7. Dimbula—Maskeliya—Bogawantalawa
  8. Kurunegala
  9. To Jaffna
  10. Pallai—Jungle—Anaradhapura—Jungle—Talawa—Dampool—Colomobo
  11. Balampitimodara—Bategama—Galle—Kaltura—Colombo
  12. Colombo Mission
  13. Tuticorin—Palamcottah
  14. Menganapuram
  15. Colombo to Australia
  16. Auckland—Wellington—Nelson
  17. Nelson—Takaka—Wakapuaka—Bellgrove—Longford—Westport
  18. Westport-—Blenheim—Napier
  19. Journey Homje—Napier to Keswick
  20. Journey to Cape of Good Hope
  21. Cape Town toWynberg
  22. Kalk Bay—Mowbray
  23. Cathedral Mission—Wellington—Port Elizabeth
  24. Robertson—Cape Town
  25. The Journey Home
  • Appendix

Preface

I gladly accede to the request of the writer of these journals that I should furnish a few prefatory lines to accompany them. They are a remarkable record of “modern miracles,” – miracles of grace in the hearts of men. I hope they may be read by many Christian people who may not find themselves entirely in sympathy with the tone and language adopted or with all the sentiments expressed, but who will thankfully recognise the hand of the Lord in the journeys taken and the ·work done. I do not envy the man who can read unmoved the chapter which narrates the incidents of the voyage from Colombo to Melbourne, with the jockeys and the theatrical troupe on board. The glimpses of the mission fields of Ceylon and Tinnevelly also are of extreme interest.

The circumstances which led to the Special Mission described in these pages are worthy of note. At the Keswick Convention of 1888, Foreign Missions were for the first time officially recognised in the programme. At the great missionary meeting on the Saturday, a slip of paper was sent up to the chairman, offering £10 towards sending out a “Keswick missionary.” No sooner was this announced than money and promises poured in from all parts of the tent, and within half an hour some hundreds of pounds were contributed. The original donor’s name did not transpire, and it was not until the Convention of the following year that he became known, and then, I believe, only to two persons, – the late Mr. Bowker and myself. He is now a C.M.S. missionary in the foreign field. Meanwhile the leaders of the Convention had resolved to use the money, and any that might be given at the subsequent yearly gatherings, in the first place, to sending evangelists to professing Christians rather than to the heathen, and thus by God’s grace to infuse fresh life into existing Missions rather than to found new ones, – this being regarded as a peculiarly appropriate work to be done under the auspices of the Keswick Convention. The first Special Mission undertaken in accordance with this design was that of the Rev. G. C. Grubb and Messrs. Campbell, Millard, and Richardson, to Ceylon, South India and New Zealand, which is the subject of the greater part of these pages.

Pages v-vi

Darjeeling Disaster – Triumph of the Six Lee Children

Fornt cover: Ada Lee [1856-1948], The Darjeeling Disaster. Its Bright Side. The Triumph of the Six Lee Children

The Rev. D.H. & Ada Lee were missionaries in Darjeeling, India, together with their seven children. After five of her children were killed when a landslide swept away their house and a sixth died a few days later from tetanus, Ada Lee wrote this account of their short lives. Her intention was to provide solace for other Christian parents who had also lost children.

My thanks to Redcliffe College for providing a copy of this public domain title for digitisation.

Ada Lee [1856-1948], The Darjeeling Disaster. Its Bright Side. The Triumph of the Six Lee Children. Calcutta: Evangelical Literature Depot, n.d. Pbk. pp.162. [Click to visit the download page for this title]

Contents

  • Foreword
  1. Introduction
  2. Vida Maud
  3. Lois Gertrude
  4. Wilbur David
  5. Herbert Wilson
  6. Ada Eunice
  7. Esther Dennett
  8. The Children’s Letters
  9. Jessudar, The Bengali Girl
  10. Wilbur’s Story
  11. Conclusion

Foreword

I esteem it a personal privilege to call the attention of the reading public to “The Darjeeling Disaster: Its Bright Side,” a book telling the story of -the greatest tragedy in the life of any missionary family in all the history of Missions. This book has passed through many editions before this one. I desire to express my abiding conviction that it would be of great benefit to have this book placed in the Sunday School libraries of the Christian world and read in every home. It contains a story more thrilling than fiction, but it is not fiction. It is the story of the Christian living and marvellously triumphant translation of real children. I knew them well and loved them dearly. It sets forth an ideal Christian home, in which there were active vigorous boys and girls, and earnest’ Christian parents’. The story of this family presents a standard of Christian living for both parents and children. I have known lively boys and girls to read and re-read this hook until the pages were worn and soiled, with the result that their lives were transformed.

The book will tell its own story. But I wish in this introductory note, to tell a comforting part of the story, not contained in the book, and not generally known….

Page 1

Stories and Surveys of Missionary Enterprise in India

William C. Irvine [1871-1946], W, Redwood, A.C. Rose, W. Wilcox, eds., Indian Realities. Stories and Surveys of Missionary Enterprise in India by Workers from Assemblies in the Homelands

As the title suggests, this is an overview of missionary work in India published about 1937. It features a large number of black and white photographs. My thanks to Redcliffe College for making a copy of this public domain title available for digitisation.

William C. Irvine [1871-1946], W, Redwood, A.C. Rose, W. Wilcox, eds., Indian Realities. Stories and Surveys of Missionary Enterprise in India by Workers from Assemblies in the Homelands. Bangalore, India: The Scripture Literature Press, [1937]. Hbk. pp.210. [Click to visit the download page for this title]

Contents

  • Prologue
  • Introductory
  1. the Godavari District
  2. Pilgrim Preachers
  3. Bihar abd Northern India
  4. Hospital Work and Witness
  5. The Belguam District
  6. The Good News in Print
  7. The Kanarese Field
  8. No Mean Cities
  9. Shall the Prey be Taken from the Mighty
  10. The Lepers are Cleansed
  11. Travancore and Cochin
  12. Work Among Women
  13. In Tinnevelly
  14. Among the Children in School and Orphanage
  15. Pondocherry
  16. The Depressed Missions
  17. Our Indian Fellow-Workers
  18. Much Land to be Possessed
  19. Suggestions for Prospective Workers
  • Epilogue
  • Appendix I
  • Appendix II
  • Map of India

Indian Realities; of course the half cannot be told, either the dark or the bright, but we have gathered some of them into a bundle within the covers of this book. Our object is, frankly, to share them with you, who although you have so many of your own burdens to carry, cheerfully fulfil the law of Christ by shouldering your neighbours’.

Here is a grim village specimen, dated this year of grace 1937, September. “A report of a man being sacrificed to propitiate the Rain God in Gunpur village, near Hahan Thesil, Bombay Presidency, where drought is prevailing this year, has been re-ceived here. It is alleged that the victim was decoyed from another village. In chains, with his forehead smeared with ash and vermilion and with a garland round his neck, the man was paraded through the streets to the accompaniment of the beat of drums, and shortly after he was beheaded with a sharp axe before the village temple. The head was placed reverently by the villagers before the deity. On re-ceiving the news of the human sacrifice, the Police from the adjoining Tehsil arrived on the scene and seized the body and arrested twenty-five persons, in-cluding the headman of the village, the perpetrator of the crime, and the priest who officiated at the ceremony.” 

Page 1

Leprosy Mission in India, Japan & China

John Jackson [1853-1917], In Leper-Land. A Record of 7,000 Miles among Indian Lepers, with a Glimpse of Hawaii, Japan, and China

This is John Jackson’s record of his 7,000 mile tour (in about 1900) through India, China and Japan on behalf of the Mission to Lepers, now The Leprosy Mission.

My thanks to Redcliffe College for providing a copy of this public domain book for digitisation.

John Jackson [1853-1917], In Leper-Land. A Record of 7,000 Miles among Indian Lepers, with a Glimpse of Hawaii, Japan, and China. London: The Mission to Lepers, [1914]. Hbk. pp.208. [Click here to visit The Leprosy Mission page for the download link for this book and related titles]

Contents

  1. Bombay
  2. Pui and Poladur
  3. Nasik
  4. Wardha and Raipur
  5. Chandkuri
  6. Mungeli
  7. Purulia
  8. Purulia (continued)
  9. Asansol
  10. Raniganj and Bhangalpur
  11. Calcutta
  12. The Cry of the Children
  13. An Indian Snowstorm
  14. Almora
  15. Almora to Chandag
  16. Chandag Heights—The Place
  17. Chandag Heights—The Worker
  18. Chandag Heights—The Work
  19. Moradabad, Rurki, and Dehra Dun
  20. Saharanpur, Ludhiana, ad Ambala
  21. Tarn Taran
  22. Ramachandrapuram
  23. Sholapur, Poona, and Miraj
  24. A World Tour

Chapter 1

This volume is the record of a Tour extending to 7,000 miles of Indian travel and occupying a period of twenty weeks, exclusive of the voyages out and home. My primary purpose was to ascertain by personal observation the real condition of the lepers of India, and to obtain a direct insight into the work of ministering to their physical and spiritual needs. It was fitting, therefore, that my first visit to any place of public interest should be to the ” Homeless Leper Asylum,” as it is officially termed, at Matunga, Bombay. The drive of five miles through the city presented to my unfamiliar gaze more features of interest than one pair of eyes could apprehend. While trying to seize the points of a group full of life and colour on the right, figures and scenes of beauty or squalor, but picturesque in either case, were escaping me on the left….

page 15

Cobra’s Den and Other Stories of Missionary Work among the Telugas of India

Jacob Chamberlain [1835-1908], The Cobra's Den, and other stories of missionary work among the Telugus of India.

Jacob Chamberlain was a Medical Missionary from Connecticut who served in India amongst the Teluga people.

Chamberlain effectively used his medical and surgical work to open the way for Christian teaching. Considered one of the most enterprising of modern missionaries, he is credited in large measure for the marked success and rapid growth of the Christian church in India. His amazing experiences became the primary material for tracts and books.


Florence R. Scott, Evangelical Dictionary of Christian Missions, p. 172

My thanks to Redcliffe College for providing a copy of this public domain title for digitisation.

Jacob Chamberlain [1835-1908], The Cobra’s Den, and other stories of missionary work among the Telugus of India. New York / Chicago: Fleming H. Revell Co., 1900. Hbk. pp.270. [Click to visit the Jacob Chamberlain page for the download link to this book and other material]

Contents

  • Introductory
  1. The Cobra’s Den
  2. The Snake-Bitten Hindu’s Story
  3. The Angry Mob and the Story of the Cross
  4. The Surgeon’s Knife Dethrones a Hindu Idol
  5. Yes, or No? Instructions Wanted
  6. Those Torn-Up Gospels
  7. The Hindu Judge’s Opinion of the Bible
  8. Marketing the Bible
  9. A Medico-Evangelistic Tour
  10. Hinduism as It Is
  11. “Lord Ganésa” and Little Rámaswámi
  12. A Brahman’s Testimony
  13. A Daybreak Audience and a Chase for a Tiger
  14. The Spotted Tiger Foiled
  15. The Heat of India: How I Keep My Study Cool
  16. Oddities of Travel in India
  17. A Missionary Sanitarium
  18. How the “Cut” Cuts
  19. How Hindu Christians Give
  20. A Merchant of Means Join Us
  21. “Break Cocoanuts Over the Wheels”
  22. The Weaving of India Rugs or God’s Plans in Our Lives
  23. “Despondent Missionaries”
  24. The Change of Front in India
  25. Vernacular Preaching: Is it Ineffective?”
  26. A Unique Missionary Meeting on the Himálayas
  27. The Oriental “Bride of the Lamb”

Preface

The exceedingly kind reception given on both sides of the Atlantic, to “In the Tiger Jungle and Other Stories of Missionary Work among the Telugus” seems to indicate that such simple sketches of incidents in the life and work of any earnest, observant missionary have a place of some importance, in quickening the interest of both young people and older in all that pertains to the spread of the Kingdom, and that another collection of such sketches may not be out of place. Indeed, many urgent requests, from both friends and strangers, in Europe, Asia, and America, have been received, that at the earliest date another such collection should be issued. As these requests have come largely from acknowledged leaders in the church in the Home Lands, as well as from fellow-missionaries in different countries, and from Missionary Secretaries of many Societies and Boards, the call can no longer be left unheeded…Page 7

Strong Tower – an Account of the Nosu Church of Tibet by Marshall Broomhall

Marshall Broomhall [1866-1937], Strong Tower.

Marshall Broomhall wrote this book in order to make known the challenges that the Nosu Christians of Tibet were facing in the 1940s. My thanks to Book Aid for providing a copy of this public domain title for digitisation.

Marshall Broomhall [1866-1937], Strong Tower. London: China Inland Mission, 1947. Hbk. pp.256. [Click here to visit the download page for this title]

Contents

  • List of Illustrations
  • Introduction
  1. Vignette of a Nosu
  2. Early Days
  3. Country and People
  4. Background to Adventure
  5. Hand to the Plough
  6. New Horizons
  7. Plots and Perplexities
  8. The Heat of Day
  9. The Manager
  10. Scattered Outposts: I
  11. Scattered Outposts: II
  12. Bittersweet
  13. Weathering Storms
  14. Brief Interlude
  15. Terror by Night
  16. Hors De Combat
  17. Back to the Fray
  18. Hard Pressed
  19. Alarms and Excursions
  20. Cast Upon God
  • Epilogue
  • Historical Note
  • Glossary

Frederick Baedeker, Horace Underwood and Arthur Neve – Heroes of the Cross

Frontispiece: Dr. Baedeker preaching and distributing books to convicts in Siberia
Frontispiece: Dr. Baedeker preaching and distributing books to convicts in Siberia

Christine Isabel Tinling [1869-1943], one of the founders of the Algiers Evangelistic Band, wrote short biographies of three other missionary heroes who inspired her: Frederick Baedeker, Horace Underwood and Arthur Neve of Kashmir. My thanks to Book Aid for making a copy of this public domain title available for digitisation.

Christine Isabel Tinling [1869-1943], Heroes of the Cross. Dr Frederick Baedeker :: Horace Underwood :: Arthur Neve of Kashmir. London: Marshall, Morgan & Scott. Ltd., [1933]. Hbk. pp.96. [Click here to visit the download page for this title]

Contents

  • Frederick Baedeker the Prisoners’ Friend
  • Horace Underwood of Korea
  • Arthur Neve of Kashmir

Frederick Baedeker the Prisoners’ Friend

Baedeker! Have you ever heard that name before? Perhaps not. Ask those who have travelled abroad and they will say at once, ” Oh, yes, the guide book man!” Try it and see if they don’t. His name is so well known that it has almost become a common noun. People speak of taking their Baedeker with them, as they would speak of taking their umbrella or their purse.

Karl Baedeker was a German book-seller and publisher, and he brought out guide-books of different countries till he had described most of the civilised lands of the world. They were packed full of useful information and told you where to go and what to see and what to pay. They were printed in German and French and English and Baedeker thus became famous. His success was due to hard work: he was very careful and exact in all he wrote, and then too, he employed good scholars to help him.

But our story is about another Baedeker, not that one. The guide-book man had a cousin who sometimes W’I’ote for him, and he also became famous, in a different way. Karl was a guide to all parts of the earth and a very good one to: Frederick was to thousands of people a guide to heaven. He showed them the way to God; he taught them to put their trust in Jesus, who is the Way, the Truth and the Life.

Frederick became known as Doctor Baedeker, becauae of the letters Ph.D. after his name, which mean “doctor of philosophy ” not medicine. But the Russian peasants to whom he afterwards went called him “Dedouchka”  or “Dear Grandfather!’ In this story I shall use all these names and you can pick out the one you like the best.

But first we must call him Frederick and begin with his boyhood for, of course, it was only long afterwards that he earned his other names.

The little town of Witten, where he was born, is near the river Rhine, which is very beautiful thereabouts. In the Baedeker home there were four boys and two girls, and Frederick was the youngest son but one. They called him Fritz for short. Their father was a naturalist; he studied animals and particularly birds. This was very jolly for the children, for he could tell them no end of interesting things and they could help him hunt for specimens.

Mr. Baedeker had a big collection of birds and their eggs, some of them very rare. There were eggs of different shades and colours, brown and blue and green, pearly white ones and pretty speckled ones. They were all sizes too, from the big eggs of the eagle and the stork down to the tiny ones of the little hedge wren. He knew them all, and the children learned to know them too. Mr. Baedeker was so famous that when people in far away parts of Europe found some egg that they could not name, they would pack it up and send it to him and he would tell them what it was. He wrote a book about birds’ eggs and painted the pictures himself. After he died his collection was taken to Berlin and placed in a natural history museum.

Fritz’s mother was rather strict, but I expect those four boys needed to be kept in order and perhaps even the girls too. Six children are quite a houseful, and I dare say they made plenty of noise. Fritz was specially fond of his elder sister Pauline, and when he was in trouble it was to her he went….

Pages 5-6