Leprosy Mission in India, Japan & China

John Jackson [1853-1917], In Leper-Land. A Record of 7,000 Miles among Indian Lepers, with a Glimpse of Hawaii, Japan, and China

This is John Jackson’s record of his 7,000 mile tour (in about 1900) through India, China and Japan on behalf of the Mission to Lepers, now The Leprosy Mission.

My thanks to Redcliffe College for providing a copy of this public domain book for digitisation.

John Jackson [1853-1917], In Leper-Land. A Record of 7,000 Miles among Indian Lepers, with a Glimpse of Hawaii, Japan, and China. London: The Mission to Lepers, [1914]. Hbk. pp.208. [Click here to visit The Leprosy Mission page for the download link for this book and related titles]

Contents

  1. Bombay
  2. Pui and Poladur
  3. Nasik
  4. Wardha and Raipur
  5. Chandkuri
  6. Mungeli
  7. Purulia
  8. Purulia (continued)
  9. Asansol
  10. Raniganj and Bhangalpur
  11. Calcutta
  12. The Cry of the Children
  13. An Indian Snowstorm
  14. Almora
  15. Almora to Chandag
  16. Chandag Heights—The Place
  17. Chandag Heights—The Worker
  18. Chandag Heights—The Work
  19. Moradabad, Rurki, and Dehra Dun
  20. Saharanpur, Ludhiana, ad Ambala
  21. Tarn Taran
  22. Ramachandrapuram
  23. Sholapur, Poona, and Miraj
  24. A World Tour

Chapter 1

This volume is the record of a Tour extending to 7,000 miles of Indian travel and occupying a period of twenty weeks, exclusive of the voyages out and home. My primary purpose was to ascertain by personal observation the real condition of the lepers of India, and to obtain a direct insight into the work of ministering to their physical and spiritual needs. It was fitting, therefore, that my first visit to any place of public interest should be to the ” Homeless Leper Asylum,” as it is officially termed, at Matunga, Bombay. The drive of five miles through the city presented to my unfamiliar gaze more features of interest than one pair of eyes could apprehend. While trying to seize the points of a group full of life and colour on the right, figures and scenes of beauty or squalor, but picturesque in either case, were escaping me on the left….

page 15

Cobra’s Den and Other Stories of Missionary Work among the Telugas of India

Jacob Chamberlain [1835-1908], The Cobra's Den, and other stories of missionary work among the Telugus of India.

Jacob Chamberlain was a Medical Missionary from Connecticut who served in India amongst the Teluga people.

Chamberlain effectively used his medical and surgical work to open the way for Christian teaching. Considered one of the most enterprising of modern missionaries, he is credited in large measure for the marked success and rapid growth of the Christian church in India. His amazing experiences became the primary material for tracts and books.


Florence R. Scott, Evangelical Dictionary of Christian Missions, p. 172

My thanks to Redcliffe College for providing a copy of this public domain title for digitisation.

Jacob Chamberlain [1835-1908], The Cobra’s Den, and other stories of missionary work among the Telugus of India. New York / Chicago: Fleming H. Revell Co., 1900. Hbk. pp.270. [Click to visit the Jacob Chamberlain page for the download link to this book and other material]

Contents

  • Introductory
  1. The Cobra’s Den
  2. The Snake-Bitten Hindu’s Story
  3. The Angry Mob and the Story of the Cross
  4. The Surgeon’s Knife Dethrones a Hindu Idol
  5. Yes, or No? Instructions Wanted
  6. Those Torn-Up Gospels
  7. The Hindu Judge’s Opinion of the Bible
  8. Marketing the Bible
  9. A Medico-Evangelistic Tour
  10. Hinduism as It Is
  11. “Lord Ganésa” and Little Rámaswámi
  12. A Brahman’s Testimony
  13. A Daybreak Audience and a Chase for a Tiger
  14. The Spotted Tiger Foiled
  15. The Heat of India: How I Keep My Study Cool
  16. Oddities of Travel in India
  17. A Missionary Sanitarium
  18. How the “Cut” Cuts
  19. How Hindu Christians Give
  20. A Merchant of Means Join Us
  21. “Break Cocoanuts Over the Wheels”
  22. The Weaving of India Rugs or God’s Plans in Our Lives
  23. “Despondent Missionaries”
  24. The Change of Front in India
  25. Vernacular Preaching: Is it Ineffective?”
  26. A Unique Missionary Meeting on the Himálayas
  27. The Oriental “Bride of the Lamb”

Preface

The exceedingly kind reception given on both sides of the Atlantic, to “In the Tiger Jungle and Other Stories of Missionary Work among the Telugus” seems to indicate that such simple sketches of incidents in the life and work of any earnest, observant missionary have a place of some importance, in quickening the interest of both young people and older in all that pertains to the spread of the Kingdom, and that another collection of such sketches may not be out of place. Indeed, many urgent requests, from both friends and strangers, in Europe, Asia, and America, have been received, that at the earliest date another such collection should be issued. As these requests have come largely from acknowledged leaders in the church in the Home Lands, as well as from fellow-missionaries in different countries, and from Missionary Secretaries of many Societies and Boards, the call can no longer be left unheeded…Page 7

Strong Tower – an Account of the Nosu Church of Tibet by Marshall Broomhall

Marshall Broomhall [1866-1937], Strong Tower.

Marshall Broomhall wrote this book in order to make known the challenges that the Nosu Christians of Tibet were facing in the 1940s. My thanks to Book Aid for providing a copy of this public domain title for digitisation.

Marshall Broomhall [1866-1937], Strong Tower. London: China Inland Mission, 1947. Hbk. pp.256. [Click here to visit the download page for this title]

Contents

  • List of Illustrations
  • Introduction
  1. Vignette of a Nosu
  2. Early Days
  3. Country and People
  4. Background to Adventure
  5. Hand to the Plough
  6. New Horizons
  7. Plots and Perplexities
  8. The Heat of Day
  9. The Manager
  10. Scattered Outposts: I
  11. Scattered Outposts: II
  12. Bittersweet
  13. Weathering Storms
  14. Brief Interlude
  15. Terror by Night
  16. Hors De Combat
  17. Back to the Fray
  18. Hard Pressed
  19. Alarms and Excursions
  20. Cast Upon God
  • Epilogue
  • Historical Note
  • Glossary

Frederick Baedeker, Horace Underwood and Arthur Neve – Heroes of the Cross

Frontispiece: Dr. Baedeker preaching and distributing books to convicts in Siberia
Frontispiece: Dr. Baedeker preaching and distributing books to convicts in Siberia

Christine Isabel Tinling [1869-1943], one of the founders of the Algiers Evangelistic Band, wrote short biographies of three other missionary heroes who inspired her: Frederick Baedeker, Horace Underwood and Arthur Neve of Kashmir. My thanks to Book Aid for making a copy of this public domain title available for digitisation.

Christine Isabel Tinling [1869-1943], Heroes of the Cross. Dr Frederick Baedeker :: Horace Underwood :: Arthur Neve of Kashmir. London: Marshall, Morgan & Scott. Ltd., [1933]. Hbk. pp.96. [Click here to visit the download page for this title]

Contents

  • Frederick Baedeker the Prisoners’ Friend
  • Horace Underwood of Korea
  • Arthur Neve of Kashmir

Frederick Baedeker the Prisoners’ Friend

Baedeker! Have you ever heard that name before? Perhaps not. Ask those who have travelled abroad and they will say at once, ” Oh, yes, the guide book man!” Try it and see if they don’t. His name is so well known that it has almost become a common noun. People speak of taking their Baedeker with them, as they would speak of taking their umbrella or their purse.

Karl Baedeker was a German book-seller and publisher, and he brought out guide-books of different countries till he had described most of the civilised lands of the world. They were packed full of useful information and told you where to go and what to see and what to pay. They were printed in German and French and English and Baedeker thus became famous. His success was due to hard work: he was very careful and exact in all he wrote, and then too, he employed good scholars to help him.

But our story is about another Baedeker, not that one. The guide-book man had a cousin who sometimes W’I’ote for him, and he also became famous, in a different way. Karl was a guide to all parts of the earth and a very good one to: Frederick was to thousands of people a guide to heaven. He showed them the way to God; he taught them to put their trust in Jesus, who is the Way, the Truth and the Life.

Frederick became known as Doctor Baedeker, becauae of the letters Ph.D. after his name, which mean “doctor of philosophy ” not medicine. But the Russian peasants to whom he afterwards went called him “Dedouchka”  or “Dear Grandfather!’ In this story I shall use all these names and you can pick out the one you like the best.

But first we must call him Frederick and begin with his boyhood for, of course, it was only long afterwards that he earned his other names.

The little town of Witten, where he was born, is near the river Rhine, which is very beautiful thereabouts. In the Baedeker home there were four boys and two girls, and Frederick was the youngest son but one. They called him Fritz for short. Their father was a naturalist; he studied animals and particularly birds. This was very jolly for the children, for he could tell them no end of interesting things and they could help him hunt for specimens.

Mr. Baedeker had a big collection of birds and their eggs, some of them very rare. There were eggs of different shades and colours, brown and blue and green, pearly white ones and pretty speckled ones. They were all sizes too, from the big eggs of the eagle and the stork down to the tiny ones of the little hedge wren. He knew them all, and the children learned to know them too. Mr. Baedeker was so famous that when people in far away parts of Europe found some egg that they could not name, they would pack it up and send it to him and he would tell them what it was. He wrote a book about birds’ eggs and painted the pictures himself. After he died his collection was taken to Berlin and placed in a natural history museum.

Fritz’s mother was rather strict, but I expect those four boys needed to be kept in order and perhaps even the girls too. Six children are quite a houseful, and I dare say they made plenty of noise. Fritz was specially fond of his elder sister Pauline, and when he was in trouble it was to her he went….

Pages 5-6

History of Anglican Missions in North India

Cover: C.F. Andrews [1871-1940], North India. Handbooks of English Church Expansion

This is a brief history of the work of Anglican missions in North India up to around 1908. My thanks to Redcliffe College for making a copy of this public domain title available for digitisation.

C.F. Andrews [1871-1940], North India. Handbooks of English Church Expansion. London & Oxford: A.R. Mowbray & Co. Ltd., 1908. Hbk. pp.243. [Click to visit the download page for this title]

Contents

  • General Preface
  • Editor’s Preface
  • Author’s Preface
  1. Early Days in Bengal
  2. Calcutta and Its Bishops
  3. Chhota Nagpur and Mass Movements
  4. Father Goreh
  5. The Oxford Mission
  6. Allahabad, Cawmpore, and Dehli
  7. The Panjab and Islam
  8. Amritsar and the Sikhs
  9. The Frontier Missions
  10. The Indian Point of View
  11. The National Movement
  • Appendix A. Modern Krishna Worship
  • Appendix B. Literature Dealing with Mission Work in North India

Editor’s Preface

Few facts in modern history are more arresting or instructive than the rapid extension of the Church’s responsibilities and labours in the colonial and missionary fields; yet, until recently, few facts perhaps have been less familiar to those who have not deliberately given themselves to a study of the subject.

It has therefore been felt that the time has come when a series of monographs, dealing with the expansion of the Church of England beyond the seas, may be of service towards fixing the popular attention upon that great cause, the growing interest in which constitutes so thankworthy a feature in the Church’s outlook to-day.

The range of this series is confined to the work in which the Church of England is engaged. That story is too full to allow of any attempt to include the splendid devotion, and the successful labours, of other Missions of Christendom. But, for a fair work, a knowledge of those Missions is essential; and it is in the hope of leading some of its readers to such further comparative study that this series has been taken in hand.

The Editors have tried to keep in view the fact that, while the wonderful achievements here recorded have been accomplished in large part through the agency of our Missionary Societies, yet these Societies are, after all, only the hands and arms of the Holy Church in the execution of her divine mission to the world…

Pages vii-viii.

Zenana Bible and Medical Missions in India

Cover: Ella Mary Weatherley [1870-1921], From West to East. Being the Story of a Recent Visit to Indian Missions

Ella Mary Weatherley was the Honorary Secretary of the Zenana Bible and Medical Mission (ZBMM) (which today has become Interserve). In around 1909 she undertook a tour of ZBMM station across India and this book is the substance of her report.

My thanks to Redcliffe College for providing a copy of this public domain title for digitisation.

Ella Mary Weatherley [1870-1921], From West to East. Being the Story of a Recent Visit to Indian Missions. London: Zenana Bible and Medical Mission, [1910]. Hbk. pp.128. [Click to visit the download page for this title]

Contents

  • Introduction
  1. Port Said
  2. Bombay
  3. Nasik
  4. Manmad
  5. Agra
  6. Cawnpore
  7. Lucknow
  8. Khurja and Bulandshahr
  9. Dehli
  10. Lamore and Kasur
  11. Benares
  12. Gorakhpur
  13. Allahabad
  14. Sultanpur
  15. Jaunpur
  16. Patna
  17. Valtoha
  18. Patti
  19. Parantij—Bombay
  20. Panchgani anbd Sholapur

Introduction by the Right Rev E.G. Ingram, D.D. [1851-1926]

I have lately been travelling over much of the ground covered by Miss Weatherley, and it is a pleasure to write a few words by way of calling attention to the sort of information she is now in a position to afford to those who are willing to know the facts about our thin Missionary fighting line.

First of all let me say that I am a great believer in the value of the impression a visitor is in a position to convey. Again and again during my Far Eastern journeys Missionaries have said, “It would never have occurred to us to put that down.” And they admitted that probably their very familiarity with the scenes in the midst of which they live has made them a little absent-minded as to the sort of facts the workers in the homeland want most to hear about. So true it is that “lookers on see most of the game!”

Then again I am anxious to say again and again that it is necessary for the Home base and the front to be intelligently and sympathetically linked together. Though doubted whether the Mission wants the casual visitor, there can be no doubt that anyone who comes from the Home Committee with a desire to give to fellow-workers the right hand of fellowship, and to get to understand their problems at first hand, will receive a warm welcome and will do much good.

Such a visit as that described in the following pages will be a distinct asset. Everything Miss Weatherley reads or hears will come to her now with a new intelligence, and the word in season will come easy both in Conference and in Committee.

The stages are constantly changing. The sort of work and worker needed yesterday may not be wanted to-morrow. The emergence of an indigenous Christianity means greater changes still. The Missionaries will do better work in proportion as they realize they have an intelligent and co-operative base behind them.

Schwartz of Tanjore by Jesse Page

Jesse Page, Schwartz of Tanjore.

Christian Friedrich Schwartz was a German Lutheran missionary who served in India for 48 years. I have tried to find the date of death for the author of this biography, Jesse Page. Finding no record of his birth or death I contacted the only one of his publishers still in existence and they agreed with my conclusion that the name was pseudonymous. As he, whoever he was, was almost certainly dead before 1948, judging by the date of his first book I am assuming that his works are in the public domain. If anyone can throw any further light on this, do get in touch with me. My thanks to the Cambridge Centre for Christianity Worldwide for making this book available for digitisation.

Jesse Page, Schwartz of Tanjore. London: SPCK, 1921. Hbk. pp.203. [Click to visit the Christian Friedrich Schwartz page for the download link for this title]

Contents

  • Preface
  1. How Christianity Came to India
  2. the Friar and the Lutheran
  3. From College to Mission Field
  4. In Touch with the Brahmins
  5. Amid War’s Alarms
  6. A Glimpse of the Man Himself
  7. Wayside Work
  8. In First Touch with Tanjore
  9. As Peacemaker with Hyder Ali
  10. The Strain Begins to Tell
  11. Tuljajee and Serfogee
  12. Responsilities and Patience
  13. A Noble Defence on Missions
  14. The Shadows Lengthen
  15. The Home Going
  16. The Memory of the Just
  • Index

Preface

There is one reason; amongst others, why the memory of Christian Frederick Schwartz deserves to be kept green in the history of missions. It is not generally known that the consuming passion for the conversion of the heathen which burned in the soul of Henry Martyn was kindled at the torch of this veteran witness for the faith. While still a student at Cambridge, Martyn was profoundly impressed by reading his journal and letters, and when he himself arrived in India, ten years after the death of Schwartz, he took counsel with many who, like Dr. Kerr, could stir his heart with first-hand stories of the venerable missionary they had known and loved so well. Happily for us, these records which moved Martyn so deeply are still preserved, fresh and vivid, a veritable classic in missionary literature.
The age of Schwartz, from a missionary point of view, has scarcely received adequate attention at the hand of the historian…

Page iii

Women’s Missionary Work in India and China

Cover: Glimpses of Women's Missionary Work in India and China.

Written shortly after the Jubilee of the Baptist Missionary Society (1867-1917), this book aims to provide a series of snapshots of the work done by female Baptist missionaries. It is illustrated by six photographic plates from India and China.

My thanks to Redcliffe College for providing a copy of this public domain title for digitisation.

George Hawker [1857-1932], Open the Window Eastward. Glimpses of Women’s Missionary Work in India and China. London: The Carey Press, [1917]. Hbk. pp.170. [Click to visit the download page for this title]

  • Preface
  1. Pioneers
  2. Zenana Echoes
  3. Zenana Schools
  4. Women’s Influence
  5. Village Itineration
  6. Boat-Tours in the Beels
  7. “Going-a-Plaguing”
  8. Famine Relief Work
  9. “Doctor Sahiba”
  10. An Industrial Settlement (Salamatpur)
  11. Education: Dehli, Entally and Ballygunge
  12. India: Review and Outlook
  13. Country Work in Shantung
  14. Bessie Campbell and Her Biographer
  15. Certain Women and their Stories
  16. In the Days of the Second Revolution
  17. The New Opportunity

Chapter 2: Zenana Echoes

When our missionary sisters entered the grudgingly opened doors of the zenanas, they were constrained, more markedly in some districts than in others, to make haste slowly. In a speech delivered in London in 1881, when the Mission was just fourteen years old, the Rev. R. F. Guyton described the evolution of zenana work proper in the city of Delhi, the scene of his own memorable labours. At first our sisters could attempt little more than the establishing of friendly relations by means of conversation on general topics. Later they were able to give lessons in reading, writing and secular subjects. Then they taught lace-work and other, feminine employments, which provided new interests and relieved the monotony of seclusion; and finally, when confidence had been secured and minds opened, they were able to introduce the Scriptures and urge the claims of Christ.

Mr. Guyton was of opinion that this policy of patience was entirely justified, and that more precipitate evangelism would have resulted in exclusion. Since that time zenana doors have been opening ever more swiftly and widely, and if the missionary staff were immensely increased, the members of it and their native assistants would find more than enough to do of actual gospel work.

In reading this address of Mr. Guyton’s, and relating it to other records, one is driven to reflect upon the appalling amount of inane and trivial talk which must have afflicted our women missionaries, taxing their patience to the point of exhaustion, in those early days, and, indeed, all the way along. Of course small talk is not peculiar to any race or to either sex, and if the conversation of the world were stenographed for a single day, and the, volume of it appraised by some commissioned angel of adequate endurance, it is gravely doubtful whether the talk of women would be adjudged to be vainer or more wearisome than that of men. That men think lightly of women’s matters is irrelevant. The angel critic, superior to masculine limitations and unbiased by masculine conceit, would weigh with equal scales….

Pages19-20.

Missions of the CMS and CEZMS in the Punjab and Sindh by Robert Clark

Robert Clark [1825-1900]

Robert Clark was one of the first two missionaries from the Church Missionary Society to arrive in the Punjab and founded the CMS mission station at Amrtisar, the CMS Afghan Mission in Peshawar and the Kashmir Mission. He was therefore well qualified to write this history of the work in the region. My thanks to the Cambridge Centre for Christianity Worldwide for making this public domain title available for digitisation.

Robert Clark [1825–1900], The Missions of the Church Missionary Society and the Church of England Zenana Missionary Society in the Punjab and Sindh. London: Church Missionary Society, 1904. Hbk. pp.280. [Click to visit the Robert Clark page for the download link for this title and others]

Contents

  • Prefatory Note
  1. Tthe Commencement of the Punjab Mission
  2. The Missionaries
  3. Statistics of the Society
  4. The Geographica; Position of the Mission Stations
  5. The People of the Punjab and Sindh
  6. The Creeds of the People of the Country
  7. Amritsar and its Institutions
  8. Batála
  9. Uddoké. The Story of the Late Rev. Pundit Khabak Singh
  10. Nárowál
  11. Anjála and Khutrain
  12. Bahrwál, Near Atárí
  13. The Tarán Táran Village Mission
  14. Jandiála
  15. The Clarkábád Agricultural Settlement
  16. Low Caste Converts and Apostasies
  17. Lahore
  18. Simla and Kotgarh
  19. Kangra
  20. Kashmír
  21. Pesháwar and Hazára
  22. The Deraját: Bannú, Dera Ismail Khán, and Tank
  23. The Belúch Mission
  24. Multán
  25. Quetta
  26. Karáachi
  27. Hyderabad
  28. Sukkur
  29. The Political Aspect of Missions
  30. Missions to Mohammedans
  31. Our Need of Chosen Agents
  32. Organisation
  33. Conclusion

Appendices

  1. Statistical Tables, 1873 to 1902
  2. Christian Literature Prepared by Members of the C.M.S. and the C.E.Z.M.S. in the Punjah and Sindh
  • Index

Lilian Mary Edward’s Work in India

Cover: Lilian Mary Edwards [1877-1945], A Welsh Woman's Work in India

Lilian Mary Edwards was the daughter of the Principal of the Baptist College in Cardiff. In this book she tells the story of her missionary service in India in order to encourage others in Wales [and beyond] to respond to the need there.

My thanks to Redcliffe College for making a copy of this public domain book available for digitisation.

Lilian Mary Edwards [1877-1945], A Welsh Woman’s Work in India. Caerphilly: Self-published, [1940]. Hbk. pp.98. [Click to visit the download page for this title]

Contents

  • Foreword
  1. The Call
  2. First Years in India
  3. Camping
  4. Zenana Visiting
  5. Women and Girls
  6. Festivals
  7. Temples
  8. Friends
  9. Daily Work in India
  10. Last Words

Chapter 1: The Call

In reviewing the lives of God’s children, we discover that they do not make their own lives, or choose their own paths. As Jeremiah writes, “It is not in man that walketh to direct his steps.” We assuredly know that our lives are in the hands of Another, and that they are intended to accomplish a purpose. We are to fit in with others “as stones fitly framed together groweth into a holy temple.” We cannot say with Henley the poet, in his “Invictus,” “I am master of my fate.”

My paternal grandfather would have rejoiced to know that his granddaughter had become a missionary. He was a farmer and monumental sculptor, living in a small village in Carmarthenshire. He kept himself well informed of missionary progress, by taking regularly the missionary magazine then issued. He not only kept himself well-informed but took care to impart the knowledge to others by reading the missionary news in the week-night meetings. In those days not everyone could read. He was so much venerated in that place that one is reminded of Job, as described “old men rose when they saw him, young men hid themselves and the princes refrained from speaking.” Not in his case the princes, but young men, if speaking or acting undesirably, saw my grandfather coming along, were heard to say in subdued tones, “Here’s John Edwards.” Prayer, inspired by the Holy Ghost, accomplishes God’s work. I became a missionary as the fulfilment of my mother’s prayer, realized twenty-five years after her death…

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