Oxford Centre for Mission Studies Library

SS Philip and James Parish Church
SS Philip and James Parish Church. Source: OCMS Website.

This morning I took a short break from the BETH Conference to visit the Oxford Centre for Mission Studies, which is only 5 minutes walk from Wycliffe Hall in the former St Philips and St James Church on Woodstock Road. The Centre has a library of over 18,000 missions books and journals, which focuses “… on the Two-Thirds World (Africa, Asia, Oceania, Latin America) and cover both the Humanities (Theology, Biblical studies, Religious studies) and the Social Sciences (Anthropology, International Development, Diaspora/Refugee Studies, Research Methods).” [Source]

Library of the Oxford Centre for Mission Studies,taken from the upper gallery
Library of the Oxford Centre for Mission Studies,taken from the upper gallery

Despite the size of the church it is crammed with bookcases, which surround the study carrels.

Library of the Oxford Centre for Mission Studies,taken from the upper gallery
Library of the Oxford Centre for Mission Studies,taken from the upper gallery
Library of the Oxford Centre for Mission Studies
Library of the Oxford Centre for Mission Studies
Library of the Oxford Centre for Mission Studies
Library of the Oxford Centre for Mission Studies

If you are a serious student of Christian Missions then this library should certainly be on your list of places to visit.

From Japan to Jerusalem by Bishop Graham Ingram

E. Graham Ingram [1851-1926], From Japan to Jerusalem

Graham Ingram, the former bishop of Sierra Leone, was the Home Secretary on the Church Mission Society. In this book he records his eight months of travel during 1909-1910 to CMS mission stations across Japan, China, Israel anf Egypt.

A copy of this handsome and well illustrated public domain volume was kindly provided by Redcliffe College for digtisation.

E. Graham Ingram [1851-1926], From Japan to Jerusalem. London: Church Missionary Society, 1911. Hbk. pp.232. [Click to visit the download page for this title]

Contents

  • Introductory
  1. The First Stage
  2. On the Siberian Railway
  3. A Foreword on Japan
  4. In Japan—Osaka
  5. In Japan—Nara, Tokushima and Kyoto
  6. In Japan—The Hokkaido
  7. In Japan—Tokyo, Hiroshima, etc.
  8. In Japan—Kiu-Shiu
  9. A Foreword on China
  10. In China—Shanghai, Hang-chow and Shaou-hing
  11. In China—Ningpo and T’ai-chow
  12. In China—At Shanghai Again
  13. In China—Fuh-Kien Province
  14. In China—Fuh-Kien Province (continued)
  15. In China—Canton
  16. In China—Kong Kong
  17. A Foreword on India and Ceylon
  18. Ceylon
  19. In India—Tinnevelly
  20. In India—Madras, Calcutta and Nadiya
  21. In India—Benares and Allahabad
  22. In India—Lucknow, Cawmpore, Agra, Dehli and Peshawar
  23. In India—Lahore, Amritsar, Tarn Taran and Batala
  24. In India—Meerut, Nasik and Bombay
  25. A Foreword on Palestine and Egypt
  26. In the Holy Land—Jaffa and Jerusalem
  27. In the Holy Land—Nazareth and Lake of Galilee
  28. In Egypt—A Week in Cairo
  • Conclusion

Introductory

The story of eight months of 1909-10 spent on the frontiers of Christendom is now sent forth for general information. It is the story of a soldier spared for a short time from his base of operations to see how the battle fared at the front and to encourage the fighting line. The importance of this record arises from more reasons than one.

A great many people are now travelling. They are found on all the great roads–north and south and east and west. They see what they go to see. Many of them, like the present writer, feel it to be their plain duty to write a book on their return! The reader must judge as to whether the ordinary globe-trotter has met with phenomena such as the following pages show forth. Travellers are very much at the mercy of their guide books….

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Kate Allenby of Mayurbhanj, India

Kate Allenby of Mayurbhanj, India 1
Kate Allenby [1871-1931]

Kate Allenby [1871-1931] was an Australian missionary to Mayurbhanj in Odisha State in Eastern India. This small book was written as a record of her work.

My thanks to Redcliffe College for providing a copy of this public domain title for digitisation.

G.B.G., Kate Allenby of Mayurbhanj. Brisbane, Queensland: Evangelical Missionary Society in Mayurbhanj, 1933. Pbk. pp.77. [Click to visit the download page for this title]

Contents

  • Foreword
  • Chapters 1-14
  • Appendix

Chapter 1

The purpose of this little volume is to Introduction bring before you as faithfully as possible the details of the life and work of Miss K. Allanby, who has just recently been laid to rest in Mayurbhanj, India, the scene of her labours for the past 40 years.

Shall we first take a brief glance into the home from whence she came, and at the parents to whom she owed the Christian influences of her childhood? Her fat her, Mr. Joseph Allanby, having lost his parents very early in Life, came out from England to Australia when quite a young man. He afterwards became a well-known hydropathist in Brisbane. Her mother, Mary Brady, was of Scottish descent, though born in Ireland. She was one of five sisters and was converted at an early age. Being the first, and for some time, the only Christian in the home, she was never fully understood by the other members of the family; although there were other converts afterwards, she had so out-distanced them in spiritual growth, that this feeling remained in spite of the fact that she always had a very strong affection for her sisters.

In the year 1865, accompanied by her mother and two of her sisters, she came out to Australia. It was on the voyage out that she first met Mr. Allanby, and they were afterwards married on January 25th, 1867, making their home in South Brisbane, Queensland.

Into this home Miss K. Allenby was born in the year 1871.

She was the second child in the family, the first being a son, who was dedicated to the Lord at birth, in the hope that, in after years, he would enter the ministry, but he died four months before his little sister Katie was born.

The parents’ hopes were now transferred to this second child. Thinking that, although she could not become a minister, she might, as a teacher, be used of the Lord, they set her apart to this end, and sought to give her the best education possible, to fit her for her future work.…

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Zenana Ministry in China – Maud Elizabeth Boaz

A Buddhist Temple and Priests. Maud Elizabeth Boaz [1873-1937], "And the Villages thereof", page 48.
A Buddhist Temple and Priests, page 48.

Maud Elizabeth Boaz served with the Church of England Zenana Mission Society in China and writes of her experiences there. My thanks to Redcliffe College for making a copy of this public domain title available for digitisation.

Maud Elizabeth Boaz [1873-1937], “And the Villages thereof”. London: Morgan & Scott, [1925]. Hbk. pp.173. [Click to visit the download page for this title]

Contents

  1. “A Sower Went Forth”
  2. Among Thorns
  3. Some by the Wayside—Some an Hundredfold
  4. Grumbles
  5. Deeper Down—Farther Out
  6. Mediums
  7. Pearls and Their Polishing
  8. “New Year—Come! Bring Prosperity!”
  9. “Clear Shining After Rain!”
  10. Through a Mountain Pass
  11. The Fining Pot
  12. Through Much Tribulation
  13. Chrysanthemums and Churches
  14. Emergency Days
  15. What if the Light Fail?

Chapter 1: “A Sower Went Forth”

It is a glorious autumn morning, the sky a cloudless blue and the air cool, fresh, and exhilarating. We are ready early for our walk to the mountain villages.

In such air, under such a sky, bathed in such sunshine, with hearts overflowing with the gladness and joy of being entrusted with the “unsearchable riches” of the blessed Gospel, we start on our way, armed with Bibles and pictures for a day’s preaching. We are taking no food with us, preferring to trust to the hospitality of the village; even if we should find our trust misplaced, we still have “food to eat that they know not of.”

The road winds round and round a mountain, with rice-fields on our left hand; the rice is almost ripe, but looks as if it badly needs the rain to swell the grain. Every blade of grass is tipped with vermilion, the bracken is turning brown and gold, and every shrub has its own distinct colour and beauty. The mountain is covered with pine and furze, and the way is very lovely.

Somehow these Chinese village roads, as they wind in and out amongst the mountains, are captivating. We are always wanting to see what is round the corner; turning corners has the greatest fascination, and they draw us on and on. At every corner turned there lies a new picture spread before us, with here and there a peep of a far-away village or hamlet, hidden amongst the trees, or nestling cosily at the foot of a mountain. Again, of a sudden we are just in front of another without any warning whatever, except, it may be, the grunt of an old mother-pig, who is venerable and wise enough to be allowed to stray of her own sweet will, since she can be trusted to find her way back by supper-time!

Sometimes our way leads straight up a mountain pass, on and on, up and up, till we reach a small resthouse on the brow of the hill, with two seats and a roof. Blessed rest-houses! How thankfully we have sunk on to a seat, after a long and weary pull up under a blazing Chinese sun! These rest-houses have been built, in the spirit of true philanthropy, by kindly men and women who have wished to do some good deed during their lives. How many travellers have rested awhile under their cool shade, before passing down the mountain on the other side!

Pages 1-2.

Herbert Stanley Jenkins , Medical Missionary to Shensi, China

Portrait: Herbert Stanley Jenkins [1874-1913]
Frontispiece

Herbert Stanley Jenkins [1874-1913] served with the Baptist Missionary Society in China. This biography also includes some material on the wider work of the BMS there.

My thanks to Redcliffe College for providing a copy of this public domain title for digitisation.

Richard Glover [1837-1919], Herbert Stanley Jenkins, M.D., F.R.C.S., Medical Missionary, Shensi, China with Some Notices of the Work of the Baptist Missionary Society in that Country. London: The Carey Press, 1914. Hbk. pp.155.

Contents

  • Author’s Note
  1. Earlier years
  2. The Work of the Baptist Missionary Society in China
  3. Shensi Work
  4. Entrance on Missionary Work
  5. The Medical Missionary
  6. The Revolution
  7. The Last Stage
  8. Some General Reflections
  9. Letters From Friends

Chapter 1: Earlier Years

The proper study of mankind is man – a study full of instruction for those who pursue it with real earnestness. The strange way in which purposes are formed, expanded, and achieved by inspirations of grace, and the honour which God puts on all faithfulness, demand attention. There is especial interest in noting how Providence, operating simultaneously on individual lives and also on nations, secures augmented results from each.

The outward features of Stanley Jenkins’ earlier life are soon told. He was born in Bristol in 1874; one of the younger members of a large family, most of them marked by physical energy, and constituting a typically happy and united home; a home where the Herbert Stanley Jenkins parents blended happily authority, love, and piety, and where the number of the children supplied the genial corrective of all selfish tendencies; a home, therefore, where all natural excellences might be expected to thrive, where good health and good temper prevented any early and weakening development of self-consciousness, where it was natural that all kindly qualities should develop.

In the history of his school-days nothing very remarkable is to be noticed, save that while still a youth (in his fourteenth year) the great awakening of the soul came to him.

Parental piety was the atmosphere in which his higher thoughts and purposes were matured. He was greatly helped by some of those activities which devote themselves to the spiritual quickening of the schoolboy. Some may criticize defects in these activities, saying they develop unduly self-consciousness, are too doctrinal in their presentation of the Gospel, and give a trend to the devout life tending to make it narrow, and lead to the idea that character is complete when conversion to God has taken place. Possibly there are grounds in some instances for such views. In the case of Stanley Jenkins no such influence can be traced. The great fact of his life was that Jesus Christ then aawned on his soul. In the language of St. Paul, “The light of the knowledge of the glory of God shone through the fac~ of Jesus Christ into his heart,” flooding it with a sunshine that never failed, but grew until it became the light of heaven….

Pages 11-13

By Canoe to Cannibal-Land by John Henry Holmes

John Henry Holmes [1866-1934], By Canoe to Cannibal-Land

This is a fictionalised account of missionary life in Papua New Guinea. My thanks to Redcliffe College for providing a copy of this title for digitisation.

John Henry Holmes [1866-1934], By Canoe to Cannibal-Land. London: London Missionary Society, 1923. Hbk. pp.144. [Click to visit the download page for this title]

Contents

  • Foreword
  1. Where Lari Found God
  2. Westward Bound
  3. Who is Avi?
  4. In the Ravi River
  5. Golgotha—A Place of Skulls
  6. A Night of Surprise
  7. A Morning Dip
  8. Sunday at Ravi
  9. A Day of Surprises
  10. Cross Currents
  11. Homeward Bound

Foreword

By Canoe to Cannibal-land” is a Papuan story of a missionary journey in the Gulf of Papua, New Guinea, told by Papuan boys in a Papuan way. The story is written in this way so that readers may discover what the thoughts of the Papuans are and what they talk about to one another. The names of the boys, men, rivers and villages have all been changed into easier forms to enable British readers to read and utter them. The ” Old Man” of the story was, as will be guessed, a missionary, and was so named, as a Papuan form of respect, when he was not called Homu.

Page 6

Kingdom Without Borders A Missionary Survey

Thomas Moscrop [1860-1920], The Kingdom Without Frontiers. A Missionary Survey

An introduction to Christians Missions written on behalf of the Wesleyan Missionary Society. My thanks to the Cambridge Centre for Christianity Worldwide for providing a copy of this public domain title for digitisation.

Thomas Moscrop [1860-1920], The Kingdom Without Frontiers. A Missionary Survey. London: Robert Culley, 1910. Hbk. pp.288. [Click to visit the download page for this title]

Contents

  • Preface
  1. The General Progress of the Enterprise
  2. The World-Outllook: The Present Position
  3. Special Signs of Success
  4. World-wide Social Results
  5. The Claiming of the Future
  6. Criticism and Testimony
  7. The Return-value of Missions
  8. Postponed and Neglected Enterprises
  9. Present Perils and Urgencies
  10. Special and Created Obligations
  11. Primary Motives and Obligations
  12. The Universal Epic

Preface

The purpose of this volume is to give such a statement of the facts of the foreign missionary enterprise, and such a survey of its operations, as will encourage those who support it to give themselves with greater zeal to ‘the furtherance of the gospel amongst non-Christian peoples. The writer, in the course of missionary advocacy, has been asked repeatedly-by enthusiastic supporters, by earnest seekers for knowledge, and by coldly critical people-to answer questions, the answers to which involved just such information as is here given; and he is assured by others having a similar experience that there is much in this work that is likely to meet the needs of those who want to know the facts.

The literature of Missions is now immense, and it is growing rapidly-this is, in itself, a proof of the growth of the enterprise-and it is obvious that much must be left out in a general work like this; but it is hoped that compression of facts will not have destroyed their living interest….

Page 7



Christianity and the Government of India

Arthur Innes Mayhew [1878-1948], Christianity and the Government of India

An important historical study of the relationships between the Government of India, that of Great Britain (and others), and Christian mission in India. My thanks to the Cambridge Centre for Christianity Worldwide for providing a copy of this public domain title for digitisation.

Arthur Innes Mayhew [1878-1948], Christianity and the Government of India. An Examination of the Christian Forces at Work in the Administration of India and of the Mutual Relations of the British Government and Christian Missions 1600-1920. London: Faber & Gwyer Ltd., n.d. Hbk. pp.260. [Click to visit the download page for this title]

Contents

  • Preface
  1. Wilberforce and the Charter of 1793
  2. Schwartz, the East India Company and Other European Powers in India
  3. Public Opinion in Church and State at Home
  4. Carey and Serampore and the Government of Bengal
  5. Signs of Grace. The Company and Trusteeship
  6. The Vellore Mutiny and Reaction
  7. Final Triumph of Wilberforce
  8. Public Opinion at Home
  9. Bishop, Chaplains and Governors-General of India. Heber, Duff and Wilson
  10. Advance on Christian Lines. Bestinck ad Dalhousie
  11. Reactionary Influence
  12. Mission Influence on Education. Duff and Wilson
  13. Further Educational Problems
  14. The Mutiny in its Religious Aspect
  15. Harmonious Co-operation
  16. The Fruits of Co-operation
  • Epilogue: Things Present and to Come
  • Books Consulted

Chapter 1: Wilberforce and the Charter of 1793

England in 1793 was anxious and perplexed. With the Bank of England suspending payment, Jacobins at work on either side of the Channel, and ‘The Rights of Man1 ‘ spreading poison over the countryside, men’s hearts were failing them for fear. No one who knew William Carey would have dared to accuse him of despair. But when that ‘ consecrated cobbler ‘ and his co-mate in enthusiasm Thomas, late surgeon of the East India Company Fleet, watched from Plymouth Hoe the East Indiaman, which should have conveyed them and their Bibles to Bengal, hull down on the horizon, there can have been few more troubled minds in that troublous year. For Captain Smyth, who had yielded so far to the persuasive tongue of Thomas as to smuggle them on board at Gravesend, had capitulated at Plymouth to the stronger coercion of a pseudonymous letter. To embark a passenger for John Company’s domain in India without a licence from that Company involved on discovery alarming penalties. But unlicensed passengers who were also ‘missionaries and schoolmasters ‘! It was as much as his place was worth….

Page 21

Missionary Church by W. Wilson Cash

William Wilson Cash [1880-1955], The Missionary Church. A Study in the Contribution of Modern Missions to Œcumenical Christianity

Reflecting on what he had observed during his thirty years of service with the Church Missionary Society, W. Wilson Cash writes on the relationship between Missions and the Church. My thanks to the Church Mission Society for their kind permission to place this book online and the Cambridge Centre for Christianity Worldwide for providing a copy for digitisation.

William Wilson Cash [1880-1955], The Missionary Church. A Study in the Contribution of Modern Missions to Œcumenical Christianity. London: Church Missionary Society, 1939. Hbk. pp.326. [Click to visit the download page for this title]

Contents

  • Foreword
  • Introduction
  1. Missionary Motives and Origins
  2. Missionary Principles and Activities in India
  3. Expanding Missions in Africa
  4. Failures and Successes in the Far East
  5. Why Missionary Societies To-day?
  6. The Church of God
  7. A Witnessing Church
  8. Self-supporting Church
  9. The Church Universal
  10. The Church that is to be

Introduction

This year I complete thirty years in the service of the C.M.S. During that time my work has carried me to many parts of the world and has given me the opportunity of discussing missionary policy with people of different races and Churches. The more I study the missionary history of the nineteenth century and its achievement in the growing universal Church, the more I am convinced that what happened in the Evangelical Revival and the founding of missionary societies was part of God’s purpose for the world, an unfolding purpose which we see more clearly to-day than our fathers did in 1799 when the C.M.S. started on its career. It seems to me, as is explained in this book, that God called forth this missionary expansion at a turning point in world history and as a preparation for this day in which we now live….

Page 1

Short Introduction to Christian Missions by Eugene Stock

Eugene Stock [1836-1928], A Short Handbook of Missions

Eugene Stock, who also wrote the massive 4-volume History of the Church Missionary Society, provides a brief – but nonetheless comprehensive – introduction to Christian missions. My thanks to the Cambridge Centre of Christianity Worldwide for providing a copy of this public domain title for digitisation.

Eugene Stock [1836-1928], A Short Handbook of Missions. London: Longmans, Green, and Co., 1904. Hbk. pp.214. [Click to visit the download page for this title]

Contents

  • Prefatory Note
  1. What is a Mission?
  2. The Purpose of Missions
  3. The Motive of Missions
  4. The Need of Missions
  5. The Methods of Missions
  6. The Mission Agencies
  7. The Missionaries
  8. The Administration of Missions
  9. The Support of Missions
  10. Missions and Governments
  11. The World’s Population: Races, Languages, Religions
  12. Non-Christian Religions and Christianity
  13. Objections and Criticisms
  14. Seventeen Centuries of the Christian Era
  15. The Eighteenth Century
  16. The Nineteenth Century—1801–1840
  17. The Nineteenth Century—1841–1872
  18. The Nineteenth Century—1872–1900
  19. General Progress since 1872
  20. Results of Protestant Missions
  21. Testimonies
  22. Some Notable Missionaries
  23. Some Prominent Native Christians
  24. Some Auxiliary Helpers of Missions
  25. Missions of the Greek and Roman Churches
  26. Mission to the Jews
  27. Fields to be Worked
  28. Obstacles to be Encountered
  29. Opportunities and Resources
  30. “In This Generation”?
  31. Edification of Converts
  32. Building the Visible Church
  33. Aid for the Daughter Churches
  34. “I Believe in the Holy Ghost”

Appendix

  1. Some Books for Study
  2. Chronological Table

Prefatory Note

The last few years have seen a great change in the attitude of the Christian public towards what are called Foreign Missions. There was in the past a great deal of earnest sympathy with them, and liberal support of them, although in comparatively limited circles; but the principles and methods, the history and environment, of Missions, were not systematically studied. It is in this respect that the change is apparent. Old missionaries on their forty or fifth or sixth furloughs say that, as they go about the country to preach and speak in behalf of the cause, they find an intelligent knowledge and appreciation of the work which is new. It is partly a cause and partly a result of this increase of knowledge that missionary books of all kinds are multiplying, and find a ready sale.

But still, for the direction of the study now becoming less uncommon, some more definite guidance seems to be called for…

Page v.