Short Introduction to Christian Missions by Eugene Stock

Eugene Stock [1836-1928], A Short Handbook of Missions

Eugene Stock, who also wrote the massive 4-volume History of the Church Missionary Society, provides a brief – but nonetheless comprehensive – introduction to Christian missions. My thanks to the Cambridge Centre of Christianity Worldwide for providing a copy of this public domain title for digitisation.

Eugene Stock [1836-1928], A Short Handbook of Missions. London: Longmans, Green, and Co., 1904. Hbk. pp.214. [Click to visit the download page for this title]

Contents

  • Prefatory Note
  1. What is a Mission?
  2. The Purpose of Missions
  3. The Motive of Missions
  4. The Need of Missions
  5. The Methods of Missions
  6. The Mission Agencies
  7. The Missionaries
  8. The Administration of Missions
  9. The Support of Missions
  10. Missions and Governments
  11. The World’s Population: Races, Languages, Religions
  12. Non-Christian Religions and Christianity
  13. Objections and Criticisms
  14. Seventeen Centuries of the Christian Era
  15. The Eighteenth Century
  16. The Nineteenth Century—1801–1840
  17. The Nineteenth Century—1841–1872
  18. The Nineteenth Century—1872–1900
  19. General Progress since 1872
  20. Results of Protestant Missions
  21. Testimonies
  22. Some Notable Missionaries
  23. Some Prominent Native Christians
  24. Some Auxiliary Helpers of Missions
  25. Missions of the Greek and Roman Churches
  26. Mission to the Jews
  27. Fields to be Worked
  28. Obstacles to be Encountered
  29. Opportunities and Resources
  30. “In This Generation”?
  31. Edification of Converts
  32. Building the Visible Church
  33. Aid for the Daughter Churches
  34. “I Believe in the Holy Ghost”

Appendix

  1. Some Books for Study
  2. Chronological Table

Prefatory Note

The last few years have seen a great change in the attitude of the Christian public towards what are called Foreign Missions. There was in the past a great deal of earnest sympathy with them, and liberal support of them, although in comparatively limited circles; but the principles and methods, the history and environment, of Missions, were not systematically studied. It is in this respect that the change is apparent. Old missionaries on their forty or fifth or sixth furloughs say that, as they go about the country to preach and speak in behalf of the cause, they find an intelligent knowledge and appreciation of the work which is new. It is partly a cause and partly a result of this increase of knowledge that missionary books of all kinds are multiplying, and find a ready sale.

But still, for the direction of the study now becoming less uncommon, some more definite guidance seems to be called for…

Page v.