Kingdom Without Borders A Missionary Survey

Thomas Moscrop [1860-1920], The Kingdom Without Frontiers. A Missionary Survey

An introduction to Christians Missions written on behalf of the Wesleyan Missionary Society. My thanks to the Cambridge Centre for Christianity Worldwide for providing a copy of this public domain title for digitisation.

Thomas Moscrop [1860-1920], The Kingdom Without Frontiers. A Missionary Survey. London: Robert Culley, 1910. Hbk. pp.288. [Click to visit the download page for this title]

Contents

  • Preface
  1. The General Progress of the Enterprise
  2. The World-Outllook: The Present Position
  3. Special Signs of Success
  4. World-wide Social Results
  5. The Claiming of the Future
  6. Criticism and Testimony
  7. The Return-value of Missions
  8. Postponed and Neglected Enterprises
  9. Present Perils and Urgencies
  10. Special and Created Obligations
  11. Primary Motives and Obligations
  12. The Universal Epic

Preface

The purpose of this volume is to give such a statement of the facts of the foreign missionary enterprise, and such a survey of its operations, as will encourage those who support it to give themselves with greater zeal to ‘the furtherance of the gospel amongst non-Christian peoples. The writer, in the course of missionary advocacy, has been asked repeatedly-by enthusiastic supporters, by earnest seekers for knowledge, and by coldly critical people-to answer questions, the answers to which involved just such information as is here given; and he is assured by others having a similar experience that there is much in this work that is likely to meet the needs of those who want to know the facts.

The literature of Missions is now immense, and it is growing rapidly-this is, in itself, a proof of the growth of the enterprise-and it is obvious that much must be left out in a general work like this; but it is hoped that compression of facts will not have destroyed their living interest….

Page 7



Christianity and the Government of India

Arthur Innes Mayhew [1878-1948], Christianity and the Government of India

An important historical study of the relationships between the Government of India, that of Great Britain (and others), and Christian mission in India. My thanks to the Cambridge Centre for Christianity Worldwide for providing a copy of this public domain title for digitisation.

Arthur Innes Mayhew [1878-1948], Christianity and the Government of India. An Examination of the Christian Forces at Work in the Administration of India and of the Mutual Relations of the British Government and Christian Missions 1600-1920. London: Faber & Gwyer Ltd., n.d. Hbk. pp.260. [Click to visit the download page for this title]

Contents

  • Preface
  1. Wilberforce and the Charter of 1793
  2. Schwartz, the East India Company and Other European Powers in India
  3. Public Opinion in Church and State at Home
  4. Carey and Serampore and the Government of Bengal
  5. Signs of Grace. The Company and Trusteeship
  6. The Vellore Mutiny and Reaction
  7. Final Triumph of Wilberforce
  8. Public Opinion at Home
  9. Bishop, Chaplains and Governors-General of India. Heber, Duff and Wilson
  10. Advance on Christian Lines. Bestinck ad Dalhousie
  11. Reactionary Influence
  12. Mission Influence on Education. Duff and Wilson
  13. Further Educational Problems
  14. The Mutiny in its Religious Aspect
  15. Harmonious Co-operation
  16. The Fruits of Co-operation
  • Epilogue: Things Present and to Come
  • Books Consulted

Chapter 1: Wilberforce and the Charter of 1793

England in 1793 was anxious and perplexed. With the Bank of England suspending payment, Jacobins at work on either side of the Channel, and ‘The Rights of Man1 ‘ spreading poison over the countryside, men’s hearts were failing them for fear. No one who knew William Carey would have dared to accuse him of despair. But when that ‘ consecrated cobbler ‘ and his co-mate in enthusiasm Thomas, late surgeon of the East India Company Fleet, watched from Plymouth Hoe the East Indiaman, which should have conveyed them and their Bibles to Bengal, hull down on the horizon, there can have been few more troubled minds in that troublous year. For Captain Smyth, who had yielded so far to the persuasive tongue of Thomas as to smuggle them on board at Gravesend, had capitulated at Plymouth to the stronger coercion of a pseudonymous letter. To embark a passenger for John Company’s domain in India without a licence from that Company involved on discovery alarming penalties. But unlicensed passengers who were also ‘missionaries and schoolmasters ‘! It was as much as his place was worth….

Page 21

Missionary Church by W. Wilson Cash

William Wilson Cash [1880-1955], The Missionary Church. A Study in the Contribution of Modern Missions to Œcumenical Christianity

Reflecting on what he had observed during his thirty years of service with the Church Missionary Society, W. Wilson Cash writes on the relationship between Missions and the Church. My thanks to the Church Mission Society for their kind permission to place this book online and the Cambridge Centre for Christianity Worldwide for providing a copy for digitisation.

William Wilson Cash [1880-1955], The Missionary Church. A Study in the Contribution of Modern Missions to Œcumenical Christianity. London: Church Missionary Society, 1939. Hbk. pp.326. [Click to visit the download page for this title]

Contents

  • Foreword
  • Introduction
  1. Missionary Motives and Origins
  2. Missionary Principles and Activities in India
  3. Expanding Missions in Africa
  4. Failures and Successes in the Far East
  5. Why Missionary Societies To-day?
  6. The Church of God
  7. A Witnessing Church
  8. Self-supporting Church
  9. The Church Universal
  10. The Church that is to be

Introduction

This year I complete thirty years in the service of the C.M.S. During that time my work has carried me to many parts of the world and has given me the opportunity of discussing missionary policy with people of different races and Churches. The more I study the missionary history of the nineteenth century and its achievement in the growing universal Church, the more I am convinced that what happened in the Evangelical Revival and the founding of missionary societies was part of God’s purpose for the world, an unfolding purpose which we see more clearly to-day than our fathers did in 1799 when the C.M.S. started on its career. It seems to me, as is explained in this book, that God called forth this missionary expansion at a turning point in world history and as a preparation for this day in which we now live….

Page 1

Short Introduction to Christian Missions by Eugene Stock

Eugene Stock [1836-1928], A Short Handbook of Missions

Eugene Stock, who also wrote the massive 4-volume History of the Church Missionary Society, provides a brief – but nonetheless comprehensive – introduction to Christian missions. My thanks to the Cambridge Centre of Christianity Worldwide for providing a copy of this public domain title for digitisation.

Eugene Stock [1836-1928], A Short Handbook of Missions. London: Longmans, Green, and Co., 1904. Hbk. pp.214. [Click to visit the download page for this title]

Contents

  • Prefatory Note
  1. What is a Mission?
  2. The Purpose of Missions
  3. The Motive of Missions
  4. The Need of Missions
  5. The Methods of Missions
  6. The Mission Agencies
  7. The Missionaries
  8. The Administration of Missions
  9. The Support of Missions
  10. Missions and Governments
  11. The World’s Population: Races, Languages, Religions
  12. Non-Christian Religions and Christianity
  13. Objections and Criticisms
  14. Seventeen Centuries of the Christian Era
  15. The Eighteenth Century
  16. The Nineteenth Century—1801–1840
  17. The Nineteenth Century—1841–1872
  18. The Nineteenth Century—1872–1900
  19. General Progress since 1872
  20. Results of Protestant Missions
  21. Testimonies
  22. Some Notable Missionaries
  23. Some Prominent Native Christians
  24. Some Auxiliary Helpers of Missions
  25. Missions of the Greek and Roman Churches
  26. Mission to the Jews
  27. Fields to be Worked
  28. Obstacles to be Encountered
  29. Opportunities and Resources
  30. “In This Generation”?
  31. Edification of Converts
  32. Building the Visible Church
  33. Aid for the Daughter Churches
  34. “I Believe in the Holy Ghost”

Appendix

  1. Some Books for Study
  2. Chronological Table

Prefatory Note

The last few years have seen a great change in the attitude of the Christian public towards what are called Foreign Missions. There was in the past a great deal of earnest sympathy with them, and liberal support of them, although in comparatively limited circles; but the principles and methods, the history and environment, of Missions, were not systematically studied. It is in this respect that the change is apparent. Old missionaries on their forty or fifth or sixth furloughs say that, as they go about the country to preach and speak in behalf of the cause, they find an intelligent knowledge and appreciation of the work which is new. It is partly a cause and partly a result of this increase of knowledge that missionary books of all kinds are multiplying, and find a ready sale.

But still, for the direction of the study now becoming less uncommon, some more definite guidance seems to be called for…

Page v.