Zenana Bible and Medical Missions in India

Cover: Ella Mary Weatherley [1870-1921], From West to East. Being the Story of a Recent Visit to Indian Missions

Ella Mary Weatherley was the Honorary Secretary of the Zenana Bible and Medical Mission (ZBMM) (which today has become Interserve). In around 1909 she undertook a tour of ZBMM station across India and this book is the substance of her report.

My thanks to Redcliffe College for providing a copy of this public domain title for digitisation.

Ella Mary Weatherley [1870-1921], From West to East. Being the Story of a Recent Visit to Indian Missions. London: Zenana Bible and Medical Mission, [1910]. Hbk. pp.128. [Click to visit the download page for this title]

Contents

  • Introduction
  1. Port Said
  2. Bombay
  3. Nasik
  4. Manmad
  5. Agra
  6. Cawnpore
  7. Lucknow
  8. Khurja and Bulandshahr
  9. Dehli
  10. Lamore and Kasur
  11. Benares
  12. Gorakhpur
  13. Allahabad
  14. Sultanpur
  15. Jaunpur
  16. Patna
  17. Valtoha
  18. Patti
  19. Parantij—Bombay
  20. Panchgani anbd Sholapur

Introduction by the Right Rev E.G. Ingram, D.D. [1851-1926]

I have lately been travelling over much of the ground covered by Miss Weatherley, and it is a pleasure to write a few words by way of calling attention to the sort of information she is now in a position to afford to those who are willing to know the facts about our thin Missionary fighting line.

First of all let me say that I am a great believer in the value of the impression a visitor is in a position to convey. Again and again during my Far Eastern journeys Missionaries have said, “It would never have occurred to us to put that down.” And they admitted that probably their very familiarity with the scenes in the midst of which they live has made them a little absent-minded as to the sort of facts the workers in the homeland want most to hear about. So true it is that “lookers on see most of the game!”

Then again I am anxious to say again and again that it is necessary for the Home base and the front to be intelligently and sympathetically linked together. Though doubted whether the Mission wants the casual visitor, there can be no doubt that anyone who comes from the Home Committee with a desire to give to fellow-workers the right hand of fellowship, and to get to understand their problems at first hand, will receive a warm welcome and will do much good.

Such a visit as that described in the following pages will be a distinct asset. Everything Miss Weatherley reads or hears will come to her now with a new intelligence, and the word in season will come easy both in Conference and in Committee.

The stages are constantly changing. The sort of work and worker needed yesterday may not be wanted to-morrow. The emergence of an indigenous Christianity means greater changes still. The Missionaries will do better work in proportion as they realize they have an intelligent and co-operative base behind them.