Pearls From the Pacific by Florence Young

Florence Young
Florence Young [Frontispiece]

Florence Young [1856-1940] was born in New Zealand the daughter of Plymouth Brethren émigrés from England. She was sent back to England for her education and, following the death of her parents, she moved to Queensland, Australia. Deeply influenced by her Brethren upbringing, and by the teaching of the Keswick Convention, she began a work among the Melanesians in Queensland and later in the Solomon Islands. She was the founder of the Queensland Kanaka Mission (QKM), which became the South Sea Evangelical Mission (SSEM).

My thanks to Redcliffe College for making a copy of this public domain title available for digitisation.

Florence Selina Harriet Young [1856-1940], Pearls from the Pacific. London & Edinburgh: Marshall Brothers, 1925. Hbk. pp.256. [Click here to visit the Florence Young page for the download link for this title and other material about this remarkable lady]

Contents

  • Foreword
  1. Birth, 1856-1859, N.Z.
    Parentage
    Return To New Zealand, 1860-1865, N.Z.
    My Mother
    Invercargill and Victoria, 1866-1871, Vic.
    School in England, 1871-1874, Eng.
  2. From Darkness to Light, 1874, N.Z. 
    Sydney, England, and Continent, 1878-1881, Eng.
  3. Fairymead, 1882-1886,  Q’ld.
    Queensland Kanaka Mission, 1886-1887 Q’ld.
    England and India, 1888-1889, Eng. & India
  4. Call to China, 1890-1891, China
    Testing, 1891, China
    Yang-Chau and Kao-Iu, 1891-1892, China
    Gain After Loss, 1892, China
  5. Inland China, 1892, China
    Kuei-K’I, 1892, China
    Shang-Ts’ing, 1893, China
    Letters, 1893, China
    Ho’k’eo, 1893-1894, China
    Another Change, 1893-1894, China
    Ien-Shan, 1894, China
    Conflict, 1894,  China
  6. Return to Australia, 1894-1895, Aus, N.Z.
    “Not In Vain”, 1896, Q’ld.
    Back to China, An-Ren, 1897, China
    House Building, 1898-1899, China
    Boxer Outbreak, 1900, China
    England and Switzerland, 1901-1902, Eng., Switz.
  7. Progress in Queensland, 1899-1900, Q’ld.
    Further Testimonies, 1901-1903, Q’ld.
    North Queensland, 19012-1902, Q’ld.
  8. The Regions Beyond, 1900-1904, Sol. Islands
    Solomon Islands, 1904, Sol. Islands
    First Journey to Malaita, 1904, Sol. Islands
    Initiatory Difficulties, 1904, Sol. Islands
  9. The Spirit of Prayer in Queensland, 1905, 
    Second Journey to Malaita, 1905, Sol. Islands
    Revival in Queensland, 1906, Q’ld.
    The Year of Jubilee, 1906, Q’ld.
    Retrospect of Work in Queensland, 1882-1906, Q’ld.
  10. “Come Over and Help Us”, 1907, Sol. Islands
    Guadalcanar and Makira, 1908, Sol. Islands
    “Is Anything Too Hard For the Lord”, 1909, Sol. Islands
    Call Upon Me in the Day of Trouble”, 1909, Sol. Islands
    Sinorango, 1909, Sol. Islands
    “A Little Child Shall Lead Them”, 1909, Sol. Islands
    “Nobody Come Along You-Me”, 1909, Sol. Islands
    “The Terror By Night”, 1910, Sol. Islands
    “Behold I and the Children Which God Hath Given Me”, 1910, Sol. Islands
    “Rennell” Island, 1910, Sol. Islands
  11. The Martyr’s Crown, 1911, Sol. Islands
    England and Palestine, 1912-1913, Eng., Pales.
    “Do It With Thy Might”, 1913,  Sol. Islands
    “What I Do Thou Knowest Not Now”, 1913, Sol. Islands
    “Some Believed”, 1913, Sol. Islands 
    “She Loved Much”, 1913, Sol. Islands 
    The Lame Take the Prey”, 1913, Sol. Islands
    The Enduement of Power, 1914, Sol. Islands 
    Fellow Workers, Sol. Islands 
    “The Valley of the Shadow”, Sol. Islands
  12. The Ship and the School, Sol. Islands 
    Our Library, Sol. Islands 
    Baptisms, Sol. Islands 
    Sydney Office, Sydney 
    “Make Us All Intense For Thee”, 1924, Sol. Islands

Foreword

The following pages form a thrilling account of God’s work in the far off Islands of the South Seas, written by one whose own record of service is honourable and enviable. She tells the story of God’s grace with characteristic modesty and clear intention of ascribing all the glory of that which she recounts to Him. Christians in Great Britain know all too little of the work of the Kingdom in the more remote fields such as this one, of which these chapters tell. And thus to be brought face to face with the claim and challenge of such a story as is here unfolded cannot fail to bring the blessing of enlargement of heart and sympathy to every reader. For no privilege is more enriching than that of sympathetic and prayerful fellowship with those who are spending their treasure of life in Christ’s service on the furthermost frontier. Very heartily do I commend the perusal of what my friend, Miss Young, has written to the generous response and appreciation of the people of God in every land. They will surely read it with pleasure and profit; and rise with, I trust, newly strengthened desire to share to the utmost in all that the Lord of the Harvest is doing through His surrendered servants.

J Stuart Holden

Patteson of the Isles by Mary H. Debenham

John Coleridge Patteson

Mary H. Debenham’s short biography of the great South Sea missionary John Coleridge Patteson [1827-1871] entered the public domain this year. My thanks to Redcliffe College for providing a copy of the book for digitisation.

Mary H. Debenham [1864-1947], Patteson of the Isles. London: Oxford University Press, 1921. Hbk. pp.160. [Click to visit the download page]

Contents

  • Foreword
  1. Two Devon Boys
  2. Out to His Great Adventure
  3. Finding His Sea-Legs
  4. ‘The Multitude of the Isles’
  5. The Boys of the Islands
  6. ‘Business in Great Waters’
  7. Father of the Island Sons
  8. The Cruise of the ‘Sea Breeze’
  9. The Road of the Holy Cross
  10. The Weaving of the Net
  11. The Secret of St. Barnabas
  12. The Snatch-Snatch Boats
  13. ‘Port, After Stormy Seas’

Chapter 1: Two Devon Boys

Twelve hundred and odd years ago there was a small boy running about among  the green hills and woods of South Devon, the county that bred Drake and Hawkins and Grenville and many another gentleman adventurer who sailed westward to singe His Spanish Majesty’s beard.

This boy lived long before the days when England was one kingdom; he went about bare-legged and bare-armed, with a tunic to his knee, and talked English in a fashion that few of us would understand. But, underneath the little differences of clothes and language, he was a good deal like other boys of all ages. He probably carried a sling, and knew how to bring down a partridge or a heron. He knew when the golden-brown streams were ready for fishing. He liked to be in for as much of the excitement as possible when the older men hunted a wolf, and he liked the fun of the midsummer fair…

To find more material on John Coleridge Patteson, visit this page.

History of the Melanesian Mission

Eliza Suzanna Armstrong [1836-1908], The History of the Melanesian MissionEliza Susanna Armstrong provides a detailed history of the Melanesian Mission from 1841 to 1899. This region includes what is today Papua New Guinea, Fiji, Vanuatu and the Solomon Islands. My thanks to Redcliffe College for providing a copy of this book for digitisation. This title is in the public domain.

Eliza Suzanna Armstrong [1836-1908], The History of the Melanesian Mission. London: Isbister & Co. Ltd., 1900. Hbk. pp.372. [Download complete book in PDF]

Contents

Part 1

  1. 1841-48. The Melanesian Mission
  2. 1849-52. The Australian Board of Missions
  3. 1853-56. John Coleridge Patteson
  4. 1857-58. Winter School at Lifu
  5. 1858-61. Consecration of John Coleridge Patteson

Part 2

  1. 1861-62. Establishment at Mota
  2. 1863. Peril and Success
  3. 1863-64. In the Australian Colonies
  4. 1864. Deaths of Edwin Nobbs and Fisher Young
  5. 1865-66. The Tree Forts

Part 3

  1. 1867. S. Barnabas, Norfolk Island
  2. 1868-69. The Labour Trade in Melanesia
  3. 1870. Internal Management of Mission
  4. 1871.
  5. The Bishop’s Last Journey

Part 4

  1. 1871-72. Mr. Codrington as Head of the Mission
  2. 1873. The First Melanesian Priest
  3. 1874. The New Southern Cross
  4. 1875. Mr. Codrington in the Islands
  5. 1876. Mr. Selwyn’s Tour
  6. 1871. The Consecration of John Richardson Selwyn

Part 5

  1. 1877. The Way Open to Santa Cruz
  2. 1878. In the Santa Cruz Islands
  3. 1879. Teachers’ Meeting at Mota – Census
  4. 1880. Consecration of S. Barnabas
  5. 1881. Justice Done in the Floridas
  6. 1882. Ordination of Charles Sapibuana
  7. 1883. Great Advance in Florida
  8. 1884. Memorial Cross at Nukapu
  9. 1885. Clement Marau at Ulawa
  10. 1886. Mrs. J. Selwyn’s Visit to the Islands
  11. 1887. Retirement of Dr. Codrington
  12. 1888. The Parliament of the Floridas
  13. 1889. The Baptism of Soga
  14. 1890. Serious Illness of the Bishop
  15. 1891. The Bishop Leaves for England – His Resignation
  16. 1892. Visit of the Bishop of Tasmania
  17. 1893. British Protectorate in the Solomons

Part 6

  1. 1894. The Consecration of the Cecil Wilson
  2. 1895. S. Luke’s, Siota
  3. 1896. Women’s Work in the Mission
  4. 1897. Difficulties in Queensland
  5. 1898. Death of Bishop John Selwyn
  6. 1899. The Jubilee of the Mission

 

Patteson of Melanesia by Frank H.L. Paton

John Coleridge Patteson [1827-1871]
Public Domain photo credit: Wikipedia
Frank Paton retells the life story of John Coleridge Patteson [1827-1871] the missionary bishop of Melanesia for a new generation of readers. My thanks to Redcliffe College for providing me with a copy of the book to scan. This title is in the Public Domain.

Frank H.L. Paton [1870-1938], Patteson of Melanesia. A Brief Life of John Coleridge Patteson, Missionary Bishop. London: SPCK, [1930]. Hbk. pp.209. [Download complete book in PDF]

Contents

  1. The Lure of the Pacific
  2. The Boy and the Man
  3. Meeting His Hero
  4. The Wide Waste of Melanesia
  5. Pioneering with Selwyn
  6. Creating a Native Leadership
  7. Barrier Reefs
  8. The Greatest Thing in the World
  9. “Sticking It”
  10. Father and Son
  11. Selwyn’s Mantle
  12. A Skipper in the Pacific
  13. A Missionary Sandhurst
  14. From Cannibalism to Christianity
  15. Brothers All
  16. The Scourge of Melanesia
  17. “Greater Love Hath No Man Than This”

Epilogue: The Challenge of the Pacific

Preface

The Life of John Coleridge Patteson has been told so well and so fully by Miss Yonge that it requires some courage to tell it again. The only justification for attempting to do so is that this missionary classic has largely passed out of the ken of this generation, and we sorely need the spiritual uplift and inspiration which it never fails to bring to those who read it. Patteson was one of those rare souls who are God’s great gift not to one generation but to all; and, although it is well over fifty years since he laid down his life on the islet of Nukapu, amid the “great wide waste, of Melanesian waters, the message of his life is as living today as it was to the men of his own age. It is a message and an influence which we cannot afford to miss. [Continue Reading]