Twelve Mighty Missionaries by Esthme Ethelind Enock [1874-1947]

Esthme Ethelind Enock [1874-1947], Twelve Mighty MissionariesEsthme Enock’s biographical sketches of 12 famous missionaries has just entered the public domain. This copy was kindly provided by Book Aid for digitisation.

In the table of contents below I have linked to the bibligraphy pages on Missiology.org.uk, where you will find further material on each missionary.

Esthme Ethelind Enock [1874-1947], Twelve Mighty Missionaries. London: Pickering & Inglis, Ltd., 1936. Hbk. pp.95. [Click to visit the download page]

Contents

  1. Pastor Hsi, China
  2. James Chalmers, New Guinea
  3. Alexander Mackay, Uganda
  4. Anthony Norris Groves, India
  5. Alexander Duff, India
  6. John Williams, Erromanga
  7. Samuel Marsden, Maoriland
  8. Samuel Pollard, China
  9. Hudson Taylor, China
  10. C.T. Studd, Central Africa
  11. Dan Crawford, Central Africa
  12. Dr Richard Williams, Tierra Del Fuego

Chapter 1. Pastor Hsi, China

The exact date of Pastor Hsi’s birthday does not seem to be recorded, but he was born probably in the Autumn of 1836. Till he was seven years old the little Hsi lived the usual free life of the son of a Chinese scholar, and was encouraged in every way to be overbearing and self-willed. Then he was sent to school, a school where a shrine of Confucius occupied the place of honour. Here the boy begins the studies which, it is hoped, will make him a “Princely Man.”

But, favourable though circumstances are, they do not satisfy the heart of this boy. At the early age of eight years, as he wandered through the incense-filled Temple and gazed at the hideous idols and vivid representations of punishments and terrors beyond the grave, he would ask himself, what was the use of living. “Men find no good, and in the end—?” he said to himself….

Alexander Mackay -The Christian Hero of Uganda

Alexander Mackay. The Christian Hero of UgandaThis short biography of Alexander Mackey [1849-1890] is one of Paternoster Press’s “Memoir Series of Might Men and Women”. My thanks to Redcliffe College for providing me with a copy of this book for digitisation. This title is in the public domain.

James Joseph Ellis {1853-?], Alexander Mackay. The Christian Hero of Uganda, revised & enlarged by Esthme Ethelind Enock [1874-1947]. London: Pickering & Inglis Ltd., [1938]. Hbk. pp.95. [Click here to visit the download page]

Contents

  1. The Boy
  2. A Mother’s Prayer Answered
  3. A Letter
  4. Mackay Begins Road-Making
  5. A Rush Up to the Lake
  6. Entebbe and Uganda at Last
  7. Mackay Meets King Mtesa
  8. Mtesa’s Difficulties
  9. Arab, Priest, and Witch
  10. “The Graphic,” The Plague, and the Cart
  11. Twlce Born-Twice Dead
  12. The Passing of King Mtes
  13. Under Mwanga’s Rule
  14. The Journey Done

Chapter 1: The Boy

October 13th, 1849, in the village of Rhynie,  near Aberdeen, a little boy was born. He was Alexander Mackay, whose life was so closely interwoven with African Missions, ·and who, later, was known as Mackay of the Great Lake-Victoria Nyanza.

At the time of his birth it was bitterly cold and snowy in the windswept valley at the foot of those stem Scottish hills.

Rhynie lies in the beautiful level below Tap O’ Noth. Alec’s father was minister of Rhynie Free Church. The rugged-looking little house in wh:ch Alexander Mackay was born is still standing, an object of great interest to those who revere the intrepid preachers of the Gospel among the heathen.

In 1851 the new Free Church was building close to the Manse, and the little boy was busy every day with trowel and mortar, among the stones. The workmen loved to have him there….

Click here for more material on Alexander Mackay

History of the Bible Churchmen’s Missionary Society – First 25 years

Bible Churchmen's Society College in Bristol

The history of the Bible Churchmen’s Missionary Society, now Crosslinks, from 1922-1947. The book includes several photographs and maps showing the locations of the mission stations in India, Iran, Ethiopia, Uganda, Canada, Morocco and Burma. Reproduced by kind permission of the copyright holder Crosslinks. This PDF can be used for free educational purposes, but not sold for profit without written permission from the copyright holder.

W.S. Hooton & J. Stafford Wright, The First Twenty-Five Years of the Bible Churchmen’s Missionary Society (1922-47). London: Bible Churchmen;s Missionary Society, 1947. Hbk. pp.242. [Click to visit the download page]

Contents

  • Foreword, by the Rev. Daniel H.C. Bartlett, M.A., D.D

    Authors’ Preface

  1. A New Church Society
  2. Early Days and Small Beginnings
  3. Consolidation and Extension
  4. The Colleges
  5. Another Contindent Entered
  6. Stubborn Strongholds of Antichrist
  7. The Most Troubled Land
  8. Thrusting Outward in the Burma Field
  9. Gatehring up the Threads
  10. The Falling Star of Ethiopia
  11. China’s Two Suns
  12. Rays in India’s Darkness
  13. Bright Sky in Burma
  14. A Constellation and Single Stars
  15. The Young Crescent
  16. The Lights of Home
  17. Remote from the Battle Fronts
  18. Threatened, but not Touched
  19. Disorganization in Africa
  20. China Still in the Throes
  21. “A People Scattered and Peeled”
  22. Testing Times at Home
  23. Building Waste Places
  • Epilogue, by the Rev A.T. Houghton
  • Appendices
  • Index

Foreword

This history has been entrusted· to one who did not take part in those inner councils which germinated and eventually directed the life of B.C.M.S., but who watched with sympathetic interest from an independent position the founding of a new Society based upon the wholehearted acceptance of the trustworthiness of the Word of God written and the Word of God Incarnate.

And the object of this history is simply to give Glory to God without Whose enablement and guidance the whole effort would have expired ignominiously. But Divine Grace manifested in the gift of a practical Faith engendered a “don’t-careism” concerning the things of Time, so necessary to the launching of a new witness to Truth amidst almost universal opposition….

History of the Church Missionary Society by Eugene Stock – 4 Vols

Eugene Stock [1836-1928], The History of the Church Missionary Society. Its Environment, Its Men and Its Work, 4 Vols. Eugene Stock’s comprehensive History of the Church Missionary Society runs to 2,740 pages and 4 Volumes. My thanks to the Cambridge Centre for Christianity Worldwide for providing a set of these volumes to scan. These titles are in the pubic domain.

Eugene Stock [1836-1928], The History of the Church Missionary Society. Its Environment, Its Men and Its Work, 4 Vols. London: Church Missionary Society, 1899-1916. Hbk. pp.504 + 659 + 912 + 665. [Click to visit the download page for this set]

Table of Contents, Volumes 1-3

  • Preface
  • Author’s Preface
  • Outline of the Work
  1. The Great Commission
  2. Missions Before the Reformation
  3. Missions After the Reformation
  4. The Eighteenth Century and the Evangelical Revival
  5. Africa and the East – Waiting
  6. The Missionary Awakening
  7. The New Society and its Early Struggles
  8. The First Missionaries
  9. Africa and India: Struggle and Victory
  10. Forward Steps
  11. Rousing the Country: The Associations
  12. C.M.S. and Other Societies
  13. Sierra Leone: The White Man’s Grave; The Black Man’s Life
  14. The Finished Course
  15. India: Entering the Opened Door
  16. Insular Missions: New Zealand, Ceylon, West India, Malta
  17. The Eastern Churches: Reports for their Revival
  18. The Outlook After Twenty-Five Years
  19. The Personnel of the Period
  20. The Environment of the Period
  21. India: Changes and Development
  22. India: Progress of the Missions
  23. The Negro on Both SIdes the Atlantic, Enslaved and Free
  24. Greek, Copt, Abyssinian, Zulu, Maori, Australian, Cree
  25. Henry Venn; And Survey of Men and Things
  26. The Society and the Church
  27. The Colonial and Missionary Episcopate
  28. New Zealand: The Bishop, the Colony, and the Mission
  29. New Enterprises in Africa: Niger Expedition, Yoruba Mission East Coast
  30. The Opening of China
  31. The Society’s Finances
  32. The Jubilee
  33. The Environment: Church Developments – Anglican
  34. The Environment: Church Developments – Evangelical
  35. The Society at Home
  36. Some Recruits from the Universities
  37. Islington College and its Men
  38. Church Organization: The Church of New Zealand
  39. West Africa: Three Missions and Three Bishops
  40. East Africa: The Missionaries and the Explorers
  41. Jerusalem and Constantinople: Jew, Turk, Christian
  42. India Under Dalhouse; and the Missions in the North
  43. India: The Missions in the South
  44. India: The Punjab – For England and For Christ
  45. India: The Mutiny – Its Victims and its Lessons
  46. India: The Great Controversy – Neutrality or Christianity?
  47. India: Missions After the Mutiny
  48. Ceylon’s Isle
  49. China: In Time of War and Tumults
  50. The Great Lone Land
  51. An Anxious Period: In the Society, and in the Church
  52. The Period: More Church Developments
  53. Salisbury Square
  54. Candidates of the Period
  55. The Native Churches: Self-supporting, Self-governing, Self-extending
  56. Ebb-Tide in Africa
  57. The Niger and its Black Bishop
  58. The Islands: Mauritius and Madagascar
  59. India: Rulers and Bishops of the Period
  60. India: Babus, Brahmos, Borderers
  61. India: Agencies Evangelistic and Pastoral
  62. India: Death and Life
  63. India: A Flag for Christ in the Punjab
  64. China: New Mission and Old
  65. The Land of the Rising Sun
  66. Lands of the Utmost West: Manitoba; Metlakahtla
  67. New Zealand: War, Apostasy, Fidelity
  68. Henry Venn’s Latter Days
  69. The Environment: Church Movements
  70. The Environment: Evangelistic and Spiritual Movements
  71. The Society: Missions, Men, Money
  72. The Society: Home Influence and Organization
  73. Africa: The Flowing Tide Again: Ilala – and After
  74. Uganda: The Call and the Response
  75. The Crescent and the Cross: Missions in Mohammedan Lands
  76. India: Dioceses of Calcutta and Bombay
  77. India: Diocese of Lahore
  78. India: Diocese of Madras
  79. India: The Hill Tribes
  80. India and Ceylon: The Bishops and the Society
  81. The Far East: Advance in China and Japan
  82. The Far West: The Church among the Red Indians
  83. The Epoch of 1880-82
  84. The Environment: Ecclesiastical, Controversial, Spiritual
  85. The Society A New Era of Progress
  86. Three Memorable Years. 1885, 1886, 1887
  87. Controversies Within and Attack from Without
  88. Recruits of the Period: Men and Women
  89. High Hopes and Sore Sorrows: West Africa and the Niger
  90. High Hopes and Sore Sorrows: East Africa and Uganda
  91. British East India; The Company, The Government, and the Missions
  92. India: The Men and their Work
  93. India: Some Features, Episodes, Incidents, and Controversies of the Period
  94. Lands of Islam: Egypt, Palestine, Arabia, Persia
  95. In the Indian and Southern Oceans: Ceylon, Mauritius, New Zealand
  96. China: Onward, Inward, – and Upward
  97. Japan: The Nation, the Mission, the Church
  98. The Red Indian Missions: Patterns of Zeal and Triumphs of Grace
  99. Missions at Congresses and Conferences
  100. Seven Years of the Policy of Faith
  101. The Church, the Society and the Cause
  102. The Society: Candidates, Controbutions, and the Three Years’ Enterprise
  103. The Four Years Abroad: Africa
  104. The Four Years Abroad: Asia
  105. In Memoriam
  106. Repice, Circumspice, Prospice

Four Thousand Miles Through Central Africa for the Bible

William John Waterman Roome [1865-1937], Through Central Africa for the Bible

This is an account of a four thousand mile motor tour of central Africa on behalf of the British and Foreign Bible Society c. 1934. My thanks to Redcliffe College for providing a copy of the book for scanning. This title is in the public domain.

William John Waterman Roome [1865-1937], Through Central Africa for the Bible. London & Edinburgh: Marshall, Morgan & Scott, Ltd., [1929]. Hbk. pp.208. [Click to download complete book in PDF]

Contents

  • Foreword
  1. Uganda and the Congo
  2. In the Pigmy Forest
  3. Through the Eastern Highlands of the Congo
  4. Peace After War!
  5. Into the Sudan For the Consideration of Babel
  6. Back to the Congo
  7. Amongst the Wild Azande
  8. On to Stanleyville Through the Forest
  9. Yakusa on the Congo
  10. Forging the Chain!
  11. Back to the Forest
  12. To Gombari and on to Kampala
  13. The King’s Business
  14. Spreading the Word of Life

Foreword

This is just a story! It is not a history, or a survey! It is the “Log of· the Lingua,” the Bible Society’s motor that tours East and Central Africa. The story may give more of the sunshine than the shadow of missionary life, but is it not the joy after pain that gives the urge, the inspiration, the vision that carries the missionary on through the gross darkness of heathenism, and that more subtle darkness that comes from the impact of our – so – called – Western civilisation? That civilisation may have a refined centre. It has a very rough circumference. Africa is feeling that roughness in its intensity.

May this story from Central Africa kindle some thoughts of this wonderful land and its people around the firesides of those homelands where the delights of the African sun are only an imagination, or perhaps a memory! [Continue reading]

Africa Inland Mission Work in Central Africa

Daniel Morison Miller [1888-1965], Central Africa Revisited. A 16,000 Mile Tour Thoughout the Fields of the Africa Inland Mission in Kenya, Tanganyika, Uganda, Congo, Sudan and EgyptDaniel Miller [1888-1965] was the Deputation and Editorial Secretary of the Africa Inland Mission (A.I.M.). In the 1930s he undertook a 16,000 mile tour of A.I.M. stations in Africa and this book records what he found. My thanks to the team at Africa Inland Missions’ UK office who established that no living descendant of the author could be located. If anyone knows who might have inherited the rights to this title, please contact me. My thanks to Redcliffe College for providing me with a copy of the book to scan.

Daniel Morison Miller [1888-1965], Central Africa Revisited. A 16,000 Mile Tour Thoughout the Fields of the Africa Inland Mission in Kenya, Tanganyika, Uganda, Congo, Sudan and Egypt. London: Africa Inland Mission / London & Edinburgh: Marshall, Morgan & Scott, [1938]. Hbk. pp.121. [Click to download complete book in PDF]

Contents

  • Preface
  • Foreword
  1. Africa Through the Years
  2. The Journey Out
  3. Through Mountainous Kenya
  4. The Eldoret Area
  5. In Western Tanganyika
  6. Across the Waterways of Uganda
  7. Back in the Belgian Congo
  8. Through Egypt Via Upper and Lower Sudan
  9. The Goal
  • Epilogue

From the Dust Jacket

A record of a 16,000 mile tour through East and Central Africa. The scenes are vividly portrayed and include descriptions of:- Kenya, with its lofty mountains and picturesque tribes; the Eldoret Area on the edge of the rift valley populated by the “Cliff-dwellers” and other nomadic tribes; Tanganyika with its peace loving Basukumu, living among fantastic rocks and rolling plains. Crossing  Uganda, with its numerous waterways, a pause is made in the West Nile district to review a remarkable piece of missionary work; then follows a description of the Belgian Congo in its tropical setting, inhabited by a great variety of people. The writer turning homewards follows the winding course of the White Nile for 1,300 miles to Khartoum; crosses the scorching desert to the rainless area around Shellal, through Egypt and thus home. [Continue reading]

Dayspring in Uganda by Albert B. Lloyd

Albert B Lloyd [?-1946], Dayspring in UgandaAlbert Lloyd, the Archdeacon of Western Uganda, writes here about the work of the Church Missionary Society in that country. My thanks to Redcliffe College for providing me with a copy of this book. This book is in the public domain.

Albert B Lloyd [?-1946], Dayspring in Uganda. London: Church Missionary Society, 1921. Hbk. pp.120. [Click to download complete book in PDF]

Contents

  • Introduction
  1. The Land and the People
  2. The First Missionaries
  3. Laying the Foundations
  4. “Yet Shall He Live”
  5. The Building of the Church
  6. A Missionary Church
  7. The Lights Spreads
  8. The Gospel in Kavirondo
  9. Clouds in the Sky

Introduction

In the minds and affections of the home Church in modern days the place of Uganda has been unrivalled. It has been a name to conjure with. The early heroes and martyrs, whose names are now household words in English Christian circles; the action of the Church, good or otherwise, in saving Uganda for the Empire; the phenomenal progress of Christianity; and the testimony alike of travellers, statesmen, and traders, as to the real uplift of the people-all ·these have conspired to give Uganda a unique position. The country, however, has done more than attract attention to itself; it has stimulated interest in the missionary cause everywhere and put fresh vitality into men’s faith in Jesus Christ.

No reader must come to this book looking for a detailed history of the Mission, or he will be disappointed. There are only two incidental references to the two Roman Catholic missions in Uganda-the one French, and the English-whose converts in 1920 were said to number 230,000; we miss also any description of the constitution of the Church in Uganda, adopted in 1909, which provides for a synod, diocesan council, parochial and district councils, women’s conferences, tribunals of appeal and reference, and boards of education, missions, and theology. Again, no mention is made of Bishop Parker who succeeded Bishop Hannington and, like him but for a different cause, failed to reach Uganda, dying with others of his party at the south end of the lake. [Continue Reading]

C19th CMS Missionary Work in Uganda

Martin J. Hall [1864-1900], Through My Spectacles in Uganda; Or, The Story of a Fruitful FieldThis is a heavily illustrated history of Nineteenth Century Missionary work in Uganda undertaken by the Church Missionary Society. My thanks to Redcliffe College for providing a copy to scan. This book is in the Public Domain.

Martin J. Hall [1864-1900], Through My Spectacles in Uganda; Or, The Story of a Fruitful Field. London: Church Missionary Society, 1898. Hbk. pp.104. [Click to download the complete book in PDF]

Contents

  1. Some Very Modern History – A Chat on Deck
  2. Some More History Lessons – A Chat on Deck
  3. At the Coast
  4. On the March
  5. Kavirondo and Busoga
  6. Kyagwe
  7. Mengo
  8. The Sese and Other Islands
  9. Singo, Bulemezi, Toro, and Koki
  10. Church Scenes
  11. Odds and Ends
  12. “How Readest Thou?”

Appendices

Preface

This little book, written at the request of the. Staff of the Editorial Department of the Church Missionary Society, is the fruit of the observations of less than two years spent in Buganda, with a necessarily elementary acquaintance with the language and customs of the people. It has been written ‘in the spare and odd moments of a busy life, and for these reasons is sure to be incomplete. Nevertheless, through the .kind .corrections and revision of Mr. G. L. Pilkington, for which I am most grateful, this work may be regarded as being accurate so far as it goes, for no European is more thoroughly acquainted than Mr. Pilkington with the language, history, and customs of the Baganda.

As this book is likely to be read aloud at children’s working parties, .&c., I add a few remarks on the names and their pronunciation. Muganda. (pronounced “moo”) is a single inhabitant of Buganda, which is the .correct name of the country. Ba-ganda are a number of inhabitants of Buganda-as we describe a number of inhabitants of England as “Englishmen.” “Uganda” is a term unrecognized in the country, and does not therefore occur in this book. Luganda is the language spoken in Buganda. All vowels are sounded in ‘Luganda words occurring in this book. Thanks are due to Mr. Leakey, of the C.M.S. Buganda Mission, for the use of many of his photographs, and to Mr. E. Clegg for his reproductions of the Author’s rough sketches. [Continue reading]

Thirty Years With South Sea Cannibals – John G. Paton

James Paton [1824-1907], ed., The Story of Dr. John G. Paton's Thirty Years with South Sea Cannibals, revised by A.L. LangridgeJohn G. Paton’s story of work among the cannibals of the New Hebrides was a remarkable one and one which deserves to be shared widely. I am therefore am grateful to Redcliffe College for giving me access to their extensive collection of books on the subject which will enable me to do so. This title is in the Public Domain.

James Paton [1824-1907], ed., The Story of Dr. John G. Paton’s Thirty Years with South Sea Cannibals, revised by A.L. Langridge. London: Hodder & Stoughton, 1927. Hbk. pp.256. [Click to download complete book in PDF]

Contents

  1. Our Homes and Our Forbears
  2. Parents and School Days
  3. Leaving Home and Early Struggles
  4. In the Glasgow Slums
  5. Missionary to the Cannibals
  6. First Impressions of Heathendom
  7. Settlement and Sorrow of Tanna
  8. Superstitions and Cruelties
  9. The Visit of H.M.S. “Cordelia”
  10. Under Axe and Musket
  11. Cannibals at Work
  12. The Plague of Measles
  13. Deepening Shadows
  14. The Var Chiefs in Council
  15. The Beginning of the End
  16. A Race for Life
  17. The Last Dread Night – But Saved!
  18. To Australia For a Mission Ship
  19. In Swamp and Saddle
  20. To Scotland and Back
  21. To the Islands and Fresh Difficulties
  22. Starting of Aniwa
  23. Revenge, Heathen Practices, and Hopeful Signs
  24. Nelwand’s Elopement, and Incidents
  25. The Sinking of the Well
  26. First Book, New Eyes, and a New Church
  27. Chief Youwili Converted and the First Communion
  28. The Finger-Posts of God
  29. Death of Namakei and Other Chiefs
  30. Litsi Sore, Mungaw, Nasi and Lamu
  31. Round the World Again for a Ship
  32. Back to Australia and the Islands
  33. The Autobiography and a World Tour
  34. A New “Dayspring.” Death of Kanaka Traffic
  35. Rev Frank Paton – Missionary to Tanna
  36. Wreck of the “Dayspring”
  37. Round the World Again – at 76
  38. Back to the Islands Again, and Yet Again
  39. The Passing of Mrs Paton
  40. The Home Call

Appendix

Chapter 1: Our Home and Our Forbears

My early days were all spent in the beautiful county of Dumfries, which Scotch folks call the Queen of the South. There, in a small cottage, on the farm of Braehead, in the parish of Kirkmahoe, I was born on the 24th May, 1824. My father, James Paton, was a stocking manufacturer in a small way 1 and he and his young wife, Janet Jardine Rogerson, lived on terms of warm personal friendship with the “gentleman farmer,” so they gave me his son’s name, John Gibson; and the curly-haired child of the cottage was soon able to toddle across to the mansion, and became a great pet of the lady there.

While yet a child, five years or so of age, my parents took me to a new home in the ancient village of Torthorwald, about four and a quarter miles from Dumfries, on the road to Lockerbie. At the time, Torthorwald was a busy and thriving village, and comparatively populous, with its cottars and crofters, large farmers and small farmers, weavers and shoemakers, cloggers and coopers, blacksmiths and tailors.

There, amid the wholesome and breezy village life, our parents found their home for the long period of forty years. There too were born to them eight additional children, making in all a family of five sons and six daughters. Theirs was the first of the thatched cottages on the left, past the “miller’s house,” going up the “village gate,” with a small garden in front of it, and a large garden across the road; and it is one of the few still lingering to show to a new generation what the homes of their fathers were. [Continue reading]

Mackay of Uganda’s Story – as Told by His Sister

Alexina Harrison (Nee Mackay), The Story of the Life of Mackay of Uganda.I am very pleased to be able to add another biography of Alexander Mackay to the Missiology website – this one written by his sister. My thanks to Redcliffe College for providing me with a copy of the book to scan. This title is in the Public Domain.

Alexina Harrison (Nee Mackay), The Story of the Life of Mackay of Uganda. Pioneer Missionary by His Sister, 7th edn. London: Hodder & Stoughton, 1898. Hbk. pp.323. [Download complete book in PDF]

Contents

  1. A Discovery
  2. Early Days
  3. Transmitted Impulses
  4. Rapid Changes
  5. Life in Berlin
  6. Uganda
  7. On the March
  8. The Coast Again
  9. A Rapid Journey
  10. The Silvery Sea
  11. At the Court of Mtesa
  12. Hostile Arabs
  13. The Plague
  14. Going to Market
  15. Mackay as Undertaker
  16. “The Eleanor”
  17. The King is Dead
  18. The Reign of Terror
  19. Deeds of Blood
  20. The Night is Gone
  21. The Iron Horse

Chapter 1

It was the year 1849, in Aberdeenshire. Summer and autumn had gone, the birch and the rowan were stripped of their leaves; the gowan was no longer under the foot; and the yellow broom and the purple heather were looked for in vain. True. Tap o’ Noth still towered his majestic head above Rhynie village, but this morning he seemed to have wrapped himself in his ermine mantle, for with the exception or here and there a rough-walled, low-thatched cottage, or a crag or two projecting from his side, from summit to base he was white, snowy white.

In the village too all was bleak and desolate and still, save for the eerie sough of the wind blowing across the moor, sighing and moaning among the stiffened branches of the trees, and improvising aeolian harps in the draughty windows of the cottages. Already lines of white marked the thresholds, and thistles of frost garnished the window-panes. [Continue reading]