History of Anglican Missions in North India

Cover: C.F. Andrews [1871-1940], North India. Handbooks of English Church Expansion

This is a brief history of the work of Anglican missions in North India up to around 1908. My thanks to Redcliffe College for making a copy of this public domain title available for digitisation.

C.F. Andrews [1871-1940], North India. Handbooks of English Church Expansion. London & Oxford: A.R. Mowbray & Co. Ltd., 1908. Hbk. pp.243. [Click to visit the download page for this title]

Contents

  • General Preface
  • Editor’s Preface
  • Author’s Preface
  1. Early Days in Bengal
  2. Calcutta and Its Bishops
  3. Chhota Nagpur and Mass Movements
  4. Father Goreh
  5. The Oxford Mission
  6. Allahabad, Cawmpore, and Dehli
  7. The Panjab and Islam
  8. Amritsar and the Sikhs
  9. The Frontier Missions
  10. The Indian Point of View
  11. The National Movement
  • Appendix A. Modern Krishna Worship
  • Appendix B. Literature Dealing with Mission Work in North India

Editor’s Preface

Few facts in modern history are more arresting or instructive than the rapid extension of the Church’s responsibilities and labours in the colonial and missionary fields; yet, until recently, few facts perhaps have been less familiar to those who have not deliberately given themselves to a study of the subject.

It has therefore been felt that the time has come when a series of monographs, dealing with the expansion of the Church of England beyond the seas, may be of service towards fixing the popular attention upon that great cause, the growing interest in which constitutes so thankworthy a feature in the Church’s outlook to-day.

The range of this series is confined to the work in which the Church of England is engaged. That story is too full to allow of any attempt to include the splendid devotion, and the successful labours, of other Missions of Christendom. But, for a fair work, a knowledge of those Missions is essential; and it is in the hope of leading some of its readers to such further comparative study that this series has been taken in hand.

The Editors have tried to keep in view the fact that, while the wonderful achievements here recorded have been accomplished in large part through the agency of our Missionary Societies, yet these Societies are, after all, only the hands and arms of the Holy Church in the execution of her divine mission to the world…

Pages vii-viii.

Short Introduction to Christian Missions by Eugene Stock

Eugene Stock [1836-1928], A Short Handbook of Missions

Eugene Stock, who also wrote the massive 4-volume History of the Church Missionary Society, provides a brief – but nonetheless comprehensive – introduction to Christian missions. My thanks to the Cambridge Centre of Christianity Worldwide for providing a copy of this public domain title for digitisation.

Eugene Stock [1836-1928], A Short Handbook of Missions. London: Longmans, Green, and Co., 1904. Hbk. pp.214. [Click to visit the download page for this title]

Contents

  • Prefatory Note
  1. What is a Mission?
  2. The Purpose of Missions
  3. The Motive of Missions
  4. The Need of Missions
  5. The Methods of Missions
  6. The Mission Agencies
  7. The Missionaries
  8. The Administration of Missions
  9. The Support of Missions
  10. Missions and Governments
  11. The World’s Population: Races, Languages, Religions
  12. Non-Christian Religions and Christianity
  13. Objections and Criticisms
  14. Seventeen Centuries of the Christian Era
  15. The Eighteenth Century
  16. The Nineteenth Century—1801–1840
  17. The Nineteenth Century—1841–1872
  18. The Nineteenth Century—1872–1900
  19. General Progress since 1872
  20. Results of Protestant Missions
  21. Testimonies
  22. Some Notable Missionaries
  23. Some Prominent Native Christians
  24. Some Auxiliary Helpers of Missions
  25. Missions of the Greek and Roman Churches
  26. Mission to the Jews
  27. Fields to be Worked
  28. Obstacles to be Encountered
  29. Opportunities and Resources
  30. “In This Generation”?
  31. Edification of Converts
  32. Building the Visible Church
  33. Aid for the Daughter Churches
  34. “I Believe in the Holy Ghost”

Appendix

  1. Some Books for Study
  2. Chronological Table

Prefatory Note

The last few years have seen a great change in the attitude of the Christian public towards what are called Foreign Missions. There was in the past a great deal of earnest sympathy with them, and liberal support of them, although in comparatively limited circles; but the principles and methods, the history and environment, of Missions, were not systematically studied. It is in this respect that the change is apparent. Old missionaries on their forty or fifth or sixth furloughs say that, as they go about the country to preach and speak in behalf of the cause, they find an intelligent knowledge and appreciation of the work which is new. It is partly a cause and partly a result of this increase of knowledge that missionary books of all kinds are multiplying, and find a ready sale.

But still, for the direction of the study now becoming less uncommon, some more definite guidance seems to be called for…

Page v.

Study of World Evangelisation by David Jenks

The title explains sufficiently the scope of his book. It does not attempt to be a history of evangelisation, still less to be a history of modern missions. It is a study of evangelisation in relation to general history, a study in the way in which God speaks through history.

From the Preface
David Jenks [1866-1935], A Study of World Evangelisation.

My thanks to the Cambridge Centre for Christianity Worldwide for making a copy of this public domain title available for digitisation.

David Jenks [1866-1935], A Study of World Evangelisation. London: Student Christian Movement, 1926. Hbk. pp.168.

Contents

  • Preface
  1. The First Three Centuries
  2. The Decay of the Roman Empire
  3. Christian Monasticism
  4. Eangelisation mainly outside the Roman Empire (fourth to seventh century)
  5. The Conversion of the British Isles
  6. The Rise of Mohammedanism
  7. The Conversion of Central Europe
  8. The Crusades
  9. Evangelisation from the Ninth Century
  10. The New World
  11. The early Jesuit Missions
  12. The Struggle for the New World (first phase)
  13. North America and the French Missions
  14. The Struggle for the New World (second phase)
  15. The Beginning of Protestant Missions
  16. The Present Time
  17. The Modern Evangelisation of India
  18. Africa
  19. The Far East
  20. The Islands of the Pacific
  21. The Mohammedan World
  22. The Measure of the Task
  • Notes
  • A Short List of Dates
  • Bibliography
  • Index

Chapter 1: The First Three Centuries

1. “The Acts of the Apostles” is the earliest Church History, the forerunner of Eusebius and Bede and Burnet and others who have written of their own times. St Paul’s letters form the first missionary correspondence. One cannot point to a date when the New Testament times ended and ordinary Church history began; miracles did not cease on the death of the last Apostle, nor was St Paul supernaturally aided by a gift of foreign languages. A study of the evangelisation of the world passes imperceptibly from the days of the Apostles, through the extension of the Church in the Roman Empire and beyond, until one comes down to the modern societies with their staffs of expert workers. In one continuous enterprise from the Day of Pentecost until to-day the Holy Spirit in the Body of Christ on earth has manifested His power.

History of Protestant Missions in India from 1706 to 1881

Matthew Atmore Sherring [1826-1880] & Edward Storrow [1818-1907], The History of Protestant Missions in India from their Commencement in 1706 to 1881This would appear to be a very significant work for those interested in early missionary work in India. It covers all of the major mission agencies involved from 1706 to 1881 and summaries the progress that had been made by the end of that period.

My thanks the Cambridge Centre for Christianity Worldwide for providing a copy of this book for digitisation. The title is in the public domain.

Matthew Atmore Sherring [1826-1880] & Edward Storrow [1818-1907], The History of Protestant Missions in India from their Commencement in 1706 to 1881. London: Religious Tract Society, 1884. Hbk. pp.463. [Click to visit the download page]

Contents

  • Preface
  1. Protestant Missions in India During the Eighteenth Century
  2. Missions in Calcutta and its Vicinity
  3. Missions in Bengal, Excluding Calcutta and its Vicinity
  4. Missions Among the Kols and Santals
  5. Missions in the North0-Western Provinces, Oudh, and Rohilkhand
  6. Missions in the Punjab
  7. Missions in Central India, including Rajpootana, Holkar’s Country,the Central Provinces, the BErars, and the Nizam’s Dominions
  8. Missions in the City and Presidency of Bambay
  9. Missions of Basle Evangelical Society in the Southern Marathi Country, Canara, and Malabar
  10. Missions in Bellary and the Mysore
  11. Missions of the Church Missionary Society in North Travancore and Cochin
  12. Missions of the London Missionary Society in South Travancore
  13. Missions of the Church Missionary Society, and of the Society for the Propagation of the Gospel in Foreign Parts, in the Province of Tinnevelly
  14. Missions in the Province of Madura, of the American Board of Commisioners for Foreign Missions, and of the Society for the Propagation in Foreign Parts
  15. Missions in Tanjore, Trichinopoly, Coimbatore, and the Neelgiris
  16. Missions in the Provinces of Arcot and Salem
  17. Missions in the City of Madras an its Vicinity, including the Province of Chingleput
  18. Missions in the Provinces of Cuddapah, Kurnool, and Nellore
  19. Missions in the Kistna abd Godavery Districts, and in Vizagapatam and Ganjam
  20. Summary of the Agencies and Results of Protestant Missions in India
  • Appendix A
  • Appendix B
  • Index

Preface

The aim of this work is to show historically what Protestant Missions have accomplished in India since their commencement in the beginning of the last century. In pursuance of this object, I have collected together all the important events of these Missions, and have presented them in a succinct and consecutive narrative, thus striving to give a complete view, as in a panorama, of their operations and achievements. Notwithstanding the numerous reports which have been £or many years issued by missionaries concerning their respective fields of labour, it has hitherto been well-nigh impossible to gain an adequate and distinct conception of the wonderful work which has been accomplished in the evangelization of the people of India. While leaving matters of unnecessary detail, I have endeavoured to furnish an outline of the various methods, plans, and projects which have been pursued in the formation and growth of the Indian Protestant Church, sufficiently minute to be correct, and yet so compacted together and interwoven as to suffer neither in unity nor comprehensiveness….

Story of Irish Missions up to 1869

This is an abridged version of the Story of the Irish Church Missions to the Roman Catholics, that is Protestant Church Missions in Ireland, up to 1869. My thanks to Redcliffe College for providing a copy of this book for digitisation. This title is in the public domain.

Alexander Robert Charles Dallas [1791-1869], The Story of Irish Church Missions. Continued to the Year 1869Alexander Robert Charles Dallas [1791-1869], The Story of Irish Church Missions. Continued to the Year 1869. Dedicated to the Younger of the Church of Ireland. London: James Nisbet & Co., 1875. Hbk. pp.350. [Click to visit the download page]

Contents

  • Preface
  • Introduction
    The Story of the Irish Church Missions
  1. 1843-4
  2. 1845
  3. 1846-7
  4. 1847-8
  5. 1847-8
  • Continuation of the Story
  1. 1849-50
  2. 1851
  3. 1852
  4. 1853
  5. 1854
  6. 1855-6
  7. 1857
  8. 1859-60
  9. 1861-2
  10. 1863-6
  11. 1867-8
  12. 1869
  • Principles and General Introductions
  • Lists of MIssion Stations and Committees
  • Regulations and Constitution of the Society
  • Appendix
  • Index of Subjects

Preface

In presenting to you, in an abridged form, the “Story of the Irish Church Missions,” with a continuation of its history to the year 1869, we have an important object in view, and we trust that the regard and consideration which you have ever shown towards the members of your sister Church will lead you to accept this little book, and consider its contents with prayerful investigation. It is a common saying that “facts are stubborn things.” May we not add, also, they are precious things, the value of which cannot be overrated? The whole of our religion rests upon them; for what are systems, dogmas, opinions, if they rest not on the ground of certain great facts. All our hopes for eternity must rest, not on this system of divinity or that, but on the fact of the great Atonement….

London Society For Promoting Christianity Amongst the Jewish People

W.T. Gidney (1852/3-1909), The History of the London Society For Promoting Christianity Amongst the Jews, From 1809 to 1908The evangelisation of the Jewish people continues to be a controversial area of Christian missions. The London Society For Promoting Christianity Amongst the Jews was founded by evangelical Christians in the early nineteenth Century. The Rev. W.T. Gidney’s History covers first hundred years of the operation.

Wikipedia notes that:

In response to changing attitudes towards outreach and the Jewish people, the society has changed its name several times over the years, first to Church Missions to Jews, then The Church’s Mission to the Jews, followed by The Church’s Ministry Among the Jews, and finally to the current name of The Church’s Ministry Among Jewish People, which was adopted in 1995.

A copy of this public domain title was kindly provided for digitisation by the Cambridge Centre for Christianity Worldwide.

W.T. Gidney (1852/3-1909), The History of the London Society For Promoting Christianity Amongst the Jews, From 1809 to 1908. London: London Society For Promoting Christianity Amongst the Jews, 1908. Hbk. pp.672. [Click to visit the download page]

Chapter 1. Introductory

Before entering upon the History of the London Society for Promoting Christianity amongst the Jews, it seems necessary, by way of introduction, to give, first, a brief account of efforts to evangelize them prior to its foundation, and, secondly, a short epitome of their history in our own country.

We shall see in this chapter that, whilst there have been some attempts to bring this ancient people of God to a knowledge of His Son, Jesus Christ, they have been, for the most part, spasmodic and unorganized, without any very intelligent or sustained aim. Not that the Jews have ever been altogether neglected, nor that there has ever been a time when the “remnant according to the election of grace” was non-existent.

We pass over, in the fewest words, the age of Christ and His Apostles. His and their work for their brethren according to the flesh stands out in clear relief in the Gospels and the Acts of the Apostles….

Missions and Modern History by Robert E. Speer

Robert E. Speer, Missions and Modern HistoryRobert E. Speer sets out his threefold purpose in writing this history of 19th Century missions:

  • To correct distortions of the facts;
  • To demonstrate the significance of missions in world events;
  • To inform the reading public of important recent events.

My thanks to the Cambridge Centre for Christianity Worldwide for making these volumes available for digitisation. These books are in the public domain.

Robert E. Speer, Missions and Modern History. A Study of the Missionary Aspects of Some Great Movements of the Nineteenth Century, 2 Vols. New York: Fleming H. Revell Company, 1904. Hbk. pp. 714. [Click here to visit the download page]

Contents

  • Preface
  1. The Tai-Ping Rebellion
  2. The Indian Mutiny
  3. The Religion of the Bab
  4. The Emancipation of Latin America
  5. The Development of Africa
  6. The Reform Movement in Hinduism 

    Second Volume 

  7. The Tong Hak Insurrection
  8. The Transformation of Japan
  9. The Armenian Massacres
  10. The Going of the Spaniard
  11. The Boxer Uprising
  12. The Coming of the Slav
  13. Missions and the World Movement
  • Index

Chapter 13: Missions and the World-Movement

Of the twelve great movements which have been considered, all but two have been related to Asia. We are often told that Asia is the immovable continent, that she is what she has been and that she will remain what she is, that “some strange fiat of arrest, probably due to mental exhaustion has condemned the brown men and the yellow men to eternal reproduction of old ideas,” that there notion and institution have hardened into permanency and that the continent must be regarded as alien to great moral or intellectual movements and separate from the stirrings of life that work ceaseless change in the West. How is it possible to reconcile such a view with the facts which have passed before us? These Asiatic nations are alive. The stock is not exhausted. “The theory that China’s dependence is due to the fact that she has long since reached maturity and has outlived the natural term of national existence does not hold good….

Snapshot of China and Chinese Missions from 1907

Marshall Broomhall [1866-1937], The Chinese Empire. A General and Missionary Survey.This is an extremely detailed province-by-province survey of Chinese life and the progress of Christian missions there up to 1907. It is written by multiple authors who each had personal experience of the region they wrote about.

This title is in the public domain. My thanks to Redcliffe College for making a copy available for digitisation.

Marshall Broomhall [1866-1937], The Chinese Empire. A General and Missionary Survey. London: Morgan & Scott, [1907]. Hbk. pp.472. [Click to visit the download page]

Contents

  • Preface by The Rt. Hon. Sir Ernest Satow, G.C.M.G
  • Editor’s Preface
  • Introduction by Marshall Broomhall. Geography; Early Nestorian Missions; First Roman Catholic Effort; Second Roman Catholic Effort. Protestant Missions: Period of Preparation, 1807-1842; Period of the Ports, 1842-1860; Period of Penetration, 1860-1877; Period of Progress, Persecution, and Prosperity, 1878-1907.
  • The Province of Kwagtung by The Rev. J. Campbell Gibson, M.A., D.D. English Presbyterian Mission. Arrived In China 1874.
  • The Province of Fukien by The Rev. Llewellyn Lloyd, Church Missionary Society. Arrived In China 1876.
  • The Island of Formosa by The Rev. Thomas Barclay, M.A., English Presbyterian. Mission. Arrived In China 1874.
  • The Province of Chekiang by the Ven. Archdeacon A. E. Moule, B.D., Church Missionary Society. Arrived In China 1861.
  • The Province of Kiangsu by Rev. John Darroch, Translator For Shansi Imperial University. Arrived In China 1887.
  • The Province of Shantung by Mr. C. F. Hogg. Arrived In China 1884.
  • The Province of Chihli by The Rev. Thomas Bryson, London Missionary Society. Arrived In China 1866.
  • The Province of Hupeh by The Rev. Arnold Foster, B.A., London Missionary Society. Arrived In China 1871.
  • The Province of Kiangsi By Mr. Archibald Orr-Ewing, China Inland Mission. Arrived In China 1886.
  • The Province of Anhwei by The Rev. J. J. Coulthard, China Inland Mission. Arrived In China 1879.
  • The Province of Honan by G. Whitfield Guinness, B.A., M.B., China Inland Mission. Arrived In China 1897.
  • The Province of Hunan By Mr. A. H. Harris, Late Acting Commissioner of Customs, Changsha. Arrived In China 1883.
  • The Province of Kansu by Marshall Broomhall, In China 1890-1899.
  • The Province of Shensi by Marshall Broomhall, In China 1890-1899.
  • The Province of Shansi by Mr. Albert Lutley, China Inland Mission, Arrived In China 1887,
  • The Province of Szechwan by Mr. Jushu-A Vale, China Inland Mission. Arrived In China. 1887.
  • The Province of Yunnan by The Rev. John M’carthy, China Inland Mission. Arrived In China 1867.
  • The Province of Kweichow by The Rev. Samuel Clarke, China Inland Mission. Arrived In China 1878.
  • The Province of Kwangsi by The Rev. Louis Byrde, B.A., Church Missionary Society. Arrived In China 1898.
  • The Province of Sinkiang by Mr. George Hunter, China Inland Mission. Arrived In China 1889.
  • Manchuria by The Rev. J. W. Inglis, M.A., United Free Church of Scotland. Arrived In Manchuria in 1890.
  • Tibet by Mr. Cecil Polhill, China Inland Mission. Arrived In China 1885.
  • Mongolia by Marshall Broomhall. And Supplementary Section on Work For the Mongols At Kalgan, By Rev. J. H. Roberts, American Board of C.F.M. Arrived In China 1877.
  • The Bible in the Chinese Empire by Marshall Broomhall; Based on Material Supplied by the British and Foreign Bible Society.
  • Appendices
    I. Philology
    II. The Jews in China
    Ill. Introduction of Christianity Into China
    IV. Biographical Outlines
  • Indices
    I. Chronological
    II. General
    III. Missionary Societies
  • IV. Biographical or Personal
    V. Topographical

Spiritual Renewal and Advance in the Eighteenth Century by Arthur Skevington Wood

Arthur Skevington Wood, The Inexistinguishable Blaze. Spiritual Renewal and Advance in the Eighteenth CenturyArthur Skevington Wood’s contribution to the Paternoster Church History series, The Inextinguishable Blaze: Spiritual Renewal and Advance in the Eighteenth Century, has been out of print for many years. The publisher does not hold the digital rights to this title and all efforts to trace the author’s literary executor have failed. I am therefore placing this title on-line and requesting that anyone with information about the copyright holder please contact me.

Arthur Skevington Wood, The Inexistinguishable Blaze. Spiritual Renewal and Advance in the Eighteenth Century. Exeter: The Paternoster Press, 1967. bk. pp.256. [Click here to visit the download page]

Contents

Introduction: The Enigmatic Century

Prelude

1. The Condition of the Church
2. The Antecedents of the Revival

The Years of Visitation: 1711-1742

3. The Dawn in Wales
4. The American Awakening
5. The Moravian Contribution
6. The Trumpet Voice
7. The Conversion of the Wesleys
8. The Revival in Scotland

The Years of Evangelisation: 1742-1800

9. The Rise of American Evangelicalism
10. The Moravian Mission
11. The Spread of Methodism
12. The Calvanistic Wing
13. The Countess and Her Connexion
14. The Expansion of Evangelicalism

Postlude

15. The Message of the Revival
16. The Influence of the Revival

From the Dustjacket

The eighteenth century was an era of extremes. The extremes of debauchery and vice depicted by Hogarth were no confined to the poor; the Prime Minister, Walpole, led the way by his openly immoral life, and his “principle” of “let sleeping dogs lie” allowed every kind of public and private corruption to flourish unchecked.

Yet side by side with these poisonous weeds there grew, and flourished, and ultimately prevailed, the fruits of the good seed that were to produce the Evangelical Revival. Daniel Rowland and Howell Harris in Wales, Jonathan Edwards in New England, the golden-tongued Whitefield in England and Scotland, where revival spread like fire in the heather, and the two Wesleys, who took the world for their parish – these were roots out of dry ground indeed; yet while they probably saved Britain from horrors of such a Reign of Terror as engulfed her nearest neighbour, they most certainly lit a blaze that the darkness could not put out.

With infectious and heart-warming enthusiasm, informed and controlled by diligent scholarship and up-to-date research, Dr. Skevington Wood here tells the gripping story of those momentous days, and shews how the “candle” of men like Masters Ridley and Latimer, that had become the refining fires of Puritan times, had now grown into an inextinguishable blaze that would, in the century to follow, carry the Light of the World to the ends of the earth.

History of the Church Missionary Society by Eugene Stock – 4 Vols

Eugene Stock [1836-1928], The History of the Church Missionary Society. Its Environment, Its Men and Its Work, 4 Vols. Eugene Stock’s comprehensive History of the Church Missionary Society runs to 2,740 pages and 4 Volumes. My thanks to the Cambridge Centre for Christianity Worldwide for providing a set of these volumes to scan. These titles are in the pubic domain.

Eugene Stock [1836-1928], The History of the Church Missionary Society. Its Environment, Its Men and Its Work, 4 Vols. London: Church Missionary Society, 1899-1916. Hbk. pp.504 + 659 + 912 + 665. [Click to visit the download page for this set]

Table of Contents, Volumes 1-3

  • Preface
  • Author’s Preface
  • Outline of the Work
  1. The Great Commission
  2. Missions Before the Reformation
  3. Missions After the Reformation
  4. The Eighteenth Century and the Evangelical Revival
  5. Africa and the East – Waiting
  6. The Missionary Awakening
  7. The New Society and its Early Struggles
  8. The First Missionaries
  9. Africa and India: Struggle and Victory
  10. Forward Steps
  11. Rousing the Country: The Associations
  12. C.M.S. and Other Societies
  13. Sierra Leone: The White Man’s Grave; The Black Man’s Life
  14. The Finished Course
  15. India: Entering the Opened Door
  16. Insular Missions: New Zealand, Ceylon, West India, Malta
  17. The Eastern Churches: Reports for their Revival
  18. The Outlook After Twenty-Five Years
  19. The Personnel of the Period
  20. The Environment of the Period
  21. India: Changes and Development
  22. India: Progress of the Missions
  23. The Negro on Both SIdes the Atlantic, Enslaved and Free
  24. Greek, Copt, Abyssinian, Zulu, Maori, Australian, Cree
  25. Henry Venn; And Survey of Men and Things
  26. The Society and the Church
  27. The Colonial and Missionary Episcopate
  28. New Zealand: The Bishop, the Colony, and the Mission
  29. New Enterprises in Africa: Niger Expedition, Yoruba Mission East Coast
  30. The Opening of China
  31. The Society’s Finances
  32. The Jubilee
  33. The Environment: Church Developments – Anglican
  34. The Environment: Church Developments – Evangelical
  35. The Society at Home
  36. Some Recruits from the Universities
  37. Islington College and its Men
  38. Church Organization: The Church of New Zealand
  39. West Africa: Three Missions and Three Bishops
  40. East Africa: The Missionaries and the Explorers
  41. Jerusalem and Constantinople: Jew, Turk, Christian
  42. India Under Dalhouse; and the Missions in the North
  43. India: The Missions in the South
  44. India: The Punjab – For England and For Christ
  45. India: The Mutiny – Its Victims and its Lessons
  46. India: The Great Controversy – Neutrality or Christianity?
  47. India: Missions After the Mutiny
  48. Ceylon’s Isle
  49. China: In Time of War and Tumults
  50. The Great Lone Land
  51. An Anxious Period: In the Society, and in the Church
  52. The Period: More Church Developments
  53. Salisbury Square
  54. Candidates of the Period
  55. The Native Churches: Self-supporting, Self-governing, Self-extending
  56. Ebb-Tide in Africa
  57. The Niger and its Black Bishop
  58. The Islands: Mauritius and Madagascar
  59. India: Rulers and Bishops of the Period
  60. India: Babus, Brahmos, Borderers
  61. India: Agencies Evangelistic and Pastoral
  62. India: Death and Life
  63. India: A Flag for Christ in the Punjab
  64. China: New Mission and Old
  65. The Land of the Rising Sun
  66. Lands of the Utmost West: Manitoba; Metlakahtla
  67. New Zealand: War, Apostasy, Fidelity
  68. Henry Venn’s Latter Days
  69. The Environment: Church Movements
  70. The Environment: Evangelistic and Spiritual Movements
  71. The Society: Missions, Men, Money
  72. The Society: Home Influence and Organization
  73. Africa: The Flowing Tide Again: Ilala – and After
  74. Uganda: The Call and the Response
  75. The Crescent and the Cross: Missions in Mohammedan Lands
  76. India: Dioceses of Calcutta and Bombay
  77. India: Diocese of Lahore
  78. India: Diocese of Madras
  79. India: The Hill Tribes
  80. India and Ceylon: The Bishops and the Society
  81. The Far East: Advance in China and Japan
  82. The Far West: The Church among the Red Indians
  83. The Epoch of 1880-82
  84. The Environment: Ecclesiastical, Controversial, Spiritual
  85. The Society A New Era of Progress
  86. Three Memorable Years. 1885, 1886, 1887
  87. Controversies Within and Attack from Without
  88. Recruits of the Period: Men and Women
  89. High Hopes and Sore Sorrows: West Africa and the Niger
  90. High Hopes and Sore Sorrows: East Africa and Uganda
  91. British East India; The Company, The Government, and the Missions
  92. India: The Men and their Work
  93. India: Some Features, Episodes, Incidents, and Controversies of the Period
  94. Lands of Islam: Egypt, Palestine, Arabia, Persia
  95. In the Indian and Southern Oceans: Ceylon, Mauritius, New Zealand
  96. China: Onward, Inward, – and Upward
  97. Japan: The Nation, the Mission, the Church
  98. The Red Indian Missions: Patterns of Zeal and Triumphs of Grace
  99. Missions at Congresses and Conferences
  100. Seven Years of the Policy of Faith
  101. The Church, the Society and the Cause
  102. The Society: Candidates, Controbutions, and the Three Years’ Enterprise
  103. The Four Years Abroad: Africa
  104. The Four Years Abroad: Asia
  105. In Memoriam
  106. Repice, Circumspice, Prospice