Missionary Crusaders by Claud Field

Claud Field [1863-1941], Missionary Crusaders

A collection of 18 short biographies of missionaries from around the world, presumably intended to inspire children. These include John Eliot, David Brainerd, Robert Moffat, David Livingstone, Christian Schwartz and Adoniram Judson. My thanks to Book Aid for providing a copy of this public domain title for digitisation.

Claud Field [1863-1941], Missionary Crusaders. Stories of the Dauntless Courage and Remarkable Adventures Which Missionaries Have Had Whilst Carrying Out Their Duties in Many Parts of the World. London: Seeley, Service & Co. Ltd., 1930. Hbk. pp.221. [Click to visit the download page for this title]

Contents

  • Preface
  1. John Eliot, the Apostle to the Red Indians
  2. The Captive of the Iroquois
  3. David Brainerd Among the Redskins
  4. Hans Egede in Greenland
  5. Sixty Years Among the Red indians
  6. William Duncan at Metlahkatlah
  7. In the Highlands of Tibet
  8. Among West Indian Slaves
  9. In the Forest of Dutch Guiana
  10. The Champion of the Hottentots
  11. Robert Moffat and the Bechuanas
  12. From Slave to Bishop
  13. The Martyrs of Madagascar
  14. Livingstone’s Early Explorations
  15. Schwartz in South India
  16. At the Mercy of an Egyptian Pasha
  17. Dr. Judson in Burmah
  18. Dr. Wolff in Central Asia

6 Missionary Heroes of Africa

Cover: John C. Lambert [1857-1917], Missionary Heroes in Africa. True Stories of the Intrepid Bravery and Stirring Adventures of Missionaries with Uncivilised Man, Wild Beasts and the Forces of Nature

There are numerous volumes in the “Missionary Heroes” series, consisting of short biographies written to inspire and challenge young people by their examples. The “heroes” covered in this volume are:

My thanks to Redcliffe College for providing a copy of this public domain book for digitisation.

John C. Lambert [1857-1917], Missionary Heroes in Africa. True Stories of the Intrepid Bravery and Stirring Adventures of Missionaries with Uncivilised Man, Wild Beasts and the Forces of Nature. London: Seeley, Service & Co. Ltd., [1909]. Hbk. pp.156. [Click to visit he download page for this title]

Contents

  • Prefactory Note
  • Introduction
  1. “The Hero of Uganda”
  2. The Lion-Hearted Bishop
  3. Pioneers in Nyasaland
  4. Wortrekkers in Barotseland
  5. A Pioneer in Garenganze
  6. A Tramp Through the Great Pygmy Forest

Introduction

In a “foreword” which he contributes to Dr. Jacob Chamberlain’s attractive missionary book, In the Tiger Jitng-le, Dr. Francis E. Clark expresses the opinion that one need not patronize sensational and unhealthy fiction to find stirring adventure and thrilling narrative, and then goes on to say:-

“There is one source which furnishes stories of intense and dramatic interest, abounding in novel situations and spiced with abundant adventure ; and this source is at the same time the purest and most invigorating fountain at which our youth can drink. To change the figure, this is a mine hitherto largely unworked; it contains rich nuggets of ore, which will well repay the prospector in this new field.”

The field to which Dr. Clark refers is the history of modern Christian missions. His meaning is that the adventurous and stirring side of missionary experience needs to be brought out, and emphasis laid upon the fact that the romantic days of missions are by no means past.
There are stories which are now among the classics of missionary romance. Such are the expedition of Hans Egede to Greenland, the lonely journeys of David Brainerd among the Indian tribes of the North American forests, the voyage of John Williams from one coral island of the Pacific to another in the little ship which his own hands had built, the exploration of the Dark Continent by David Livingstone in the hope of emancipating the black man’s soul.

But among missionary lives which are more recent or less known, there are many not less noble or less thrilling than those just referred to; and the chapters which follow are an attempt to make this plain.

There is, of course, a deeper side to Christian missions-a side that is essential and invariable – while the elements of adventure and romance are accidental and occasional. If in these pages the spiritual aspects of foreign mission work are but slightly touched upon, it is not because they are either forgotten or ignored, but simply because it was not part of the writer’s present plan to deal with them. It is hoped, nevertheless, that some of those into whose hands this book may come will be induced by what they read to make fuller acquaintance with the lives and aims of our missionary heroes, and so will catch something of that spirit which led them to face innumerable dangers, toils, and trials among heathen and often savage peoples, whether in the frozen North or the burning South, whether in the hidden depths of some vast continent or among the scattered “islands of the ocean seas.”

Pages 9-11

Life and Explorations of David Livingstone

Anonymous, The Life and Explorations of David Livingstone, LL.D. Compiled from Reliable SourcesThis anonymous biography was published the year after David Livingstone’s death. It was intended to provide a condensed account of his life for young people and those unfamiliar with the Newspaper accounts and those published by the National Geographic Society.

My thanks to Redcliffe College for providing me with a copy of this book to scan. This title is in the public domain.

Anonymous, The Life and Explorations of David Livingstone, LL.D. Compiled from Reliable Sources. London: Adam & Company, [1874]. Hbk. pp.324.[Click to download complete book in PDF]

Contents

  • Preface
  1. Early years-Education-Arrival at Cape Town as a Missionary
  2. Arrives at Kuruman-Visits the Bechuana Tribes – Resolves to settle among the Bakwains – Marriage-Journeys to the Zouga River – The Bakwains attacked by the Boers
  3. The Kalahari Desert – Discovers Lake Ngami – Visits Sebituane – Death of Sebituane – Discovers the Zambesi
  4. Attack on Kolobeng by the Boers – Starts on his Great Journey
  5. Preparations for Departure – Ascends the Leeambye and the Leeba – Abundance of Animal Life – Two Female Chiefs – Visits Shinte
  6. Visits Katema’s Town – Is hospitably entertained – Lake Dilolo – Crosses the Quango, Cassaque – Arrival at Loanda
  7. Stay at Loanda – Starts on Return Journey – Dr. Livingstone again attacked with Fever – The Makololo suffer from Sickness – Descent of the Leeba and Leeambye – Arrival at Linyant
  8. Starts for the East Coast – The Victoria Falls – The Batoka Tribes – Reaches Zumbo, a deserted Portuguese Settlement
  9. Arrives in England – Enthusiastic Reception – Departs again for the Zambesi – Arrives at the Kongone Mouth of that River – Passes up the Zambesi
  10. Ascends the Shire – Friendly Natives – Discovers Lake Shirwa – Contact with Slave-hunters
  11. Starts for Linyanti – Cutting up an Elephant – The “Go-Naked” Tribe – The Victoria Falls – Finds Sekeletu ill
  12. Descends the Zambesi – Arrival of Bishop Mackenzie – Liberates a Band of Slaves – Death of Bishop Mackenzie-Arrival and Death of Mrs. Livingstone
  13. Dreadful Results of a Slave Raid – Dr. Livingstone recalled – Journey of Exploration beyond Lake Nyassa – Starts for Home – Arrival in England
  14. Starts a Third Time for Africa – His reported Murder – Expedition sent in search of him – Letters from himself – Again lost to view – Mr. H. M. Stanley finds him at Ujiji
  15. Dr. Livingstone as found by Mr. Stanley – Expedition to North End of Lake Tanganyika – Dr. Livingstone accompanies Mr. Stanley to Unyanyembe – Mr. Stanley’s Arrival in England – Sketch of his Life
  16. Letters of Dr. Livingstone – Incidents of Travel – The Slave Trade in Central Africa – Geographical Conclusions, etc.
  17. Sir Bartle Frere’s Mission – Expeditions sent to assist Dr. Livingstone – His Death – Some Account of his Family, etc.
  18. Account of Last Illness and Death of Dr. Livingstone – Public Funeral in Westminster Abbey, etc.

Thomas Hughes’s Biography of David Livingstone

Thomas Hughes [1822-1896], David LivingstoneDavid Livingstone (19 March 1813 – 1 May 1873) is regarded by some as the greatest British Missionary to Africa. This is Thomas Hughes biography of Livingstone written in 1889. My thanks to Redcliffe College for making a copy of the book available for scanning. This title is in the public domain.

Thomas Hughes [1822-1896], David Livingstone. London & New York: MacMillan & Co., 1889. Hbk. pp.208. [Click to download complete book in PDF]

Contents

  1. David Livingstone
  2. Start in Africa – Kuruman
  3. Kolobeng – Lake Ngai – The Zambesi
  4. Linyanti and the Makololo
  5. Across Africa – Loanda to Quilemane
  6. Home
  7. The Zambesi Expedition – To Linynti amd Back
  8. The Universities Mission
  9. Recall – Voyage to India
  10. Second Visit Home
  11. Lakes Moero, Bangweolo, and Tanganyika
  12. Stanley
  13. To Unyanyembe with Stanley
  14. Wating at Unyanyembe
  15. The Last Advance – Death
  16. Conclusion

Chapter 1

“My own inclination would lead me to say as little as possible about myself.” With these words the greatest explorer of modern times begins that account of his missionary journeys and researches in South Africa which electrified England. The eager desire of his countrymen to know all they could about himself, induced him to modify his own inclination so far as to devote six pages of his famous book to the history of his family, and of the early years of his own life up to the time of his sailing for the Cape at the age of twenty-three. This reticence is as characteristic of the man as are the few facts he does disclose. Foremost of these stands: “My great-grandfather fell at the battle of Culloaen, fighting for the old line of kings, and my grandfather was a small farmer in Ulva, where my father was born.” [Continue reading]

 

Livingstone and the Exploration of Central Africa

Sir H.H. Johnston [1858-1927], Livingstone and the Exploration of Central AfricaDavid Livingstone [1813-1873], pioneer medical missionary and explorer is probably the best known of Victorian missionaries. This biography is a “cheap edition” of a volume that originally appeared as part of a series about the world’s greatest explorers and was republished in this format to mark the centenary of Livingstone’s birth. My thanks to Redcliffe College for providing me with a copy to digitise. This book is now in the public domain.

Sir H.H. Johnston [1858-1927], Livingstone and the Exploration of Central Africa. London: George Philip & Son, Ltd., 1912. Hbk. pp.372. [Click to download complete volume in PDF]

Contents

Publisher’s Note

  1. Central Africa – Natural History
  2. Central Africa – Human History
  3. The Hour and the Man: Livingstone’s Upbringing
  4. First Impressions of the Missionary Life
  5. Marries, Teaches, and is Troubled
  6. The Boers, “God’s Chosen People”
  7. Mission-Work; Its Failures and Successes
  8. Missionary Becomes Explorer
  9. Betshuanaland
  10. Fever, Tsetse-Fly, and Horse-Sickness
  11. From the Zambesi to Angola
  12. From Loanda to Quilimane – Across Africa
  13. The Zambesi
  14. Livingstone Returns to England
  15. The Second Zambezi Expedition
  16. Last Visit to England
  17. Four Great Lakes and a Mighty River
  18. The Manyema and Their Land
  19. Stanley Relieves Livingstone
  20. The Death of Livingstone

Chapter 1: Central Africa – Natural History

The history of the southern half of the African continent has widely differed from the northern portion as regards the manner and period in which it has been explored and made known by rates higher than the Negro. More than that, the Negroes inhabiting the long half of the Dark Continent which lies to the south of an irregular border-line commencing at the Cameroons of the West Coast, and passing across the continent to the East Coast at Mombasa, present two very distinct language-stocks, which are totally unrepresented in the northern half of Africa For convenience, I shall call this line dividing Northern from southern Africa the “Bantu Border line,” because it coincides exactly ·with the northern limit of the Bantu language-field. [Continue reading]