Robert Morrison – A Master Builder by Marshall Broomhall

Marshall Broomhall [1866-1937], Robert Morrison, A Master Builder

A biography of the Presbyterian Missionary to Macao, Bible translator and Lexicographer Robert Morrison by the Editorial Secretary of the China Inland Mission. My thanks to Redcliffe College for providing a copy of this public domain title for digitisation.

Marshall Broomhall [1866-1937], Robert Morrison, A Master Builder. London: China Inland Mission, 1924. Hbk. pp.238. [Click to visit the Robert Morrison page for the download link for this title and others]

Contents

  • Author’s Preface
  • Table of Dates
  1. The Great Closed Land
  2. A Great Tribulation and a Little Child
  3. The Hidden Man of the Heart
  4. High Employ
  5. The Call of China
  6. The Voyage
  7. Old Canyon
  8. Facing Life’s Task
  9. Some Momentous Decisions
  10. Overlapping Extraordinary
  11. A Colleague at Last
  12. The Ultra-Ganges Mission
  13. Dismissed but Indispensible
  14. Lonely and in Constant Apprehension
  15. An Iona in the East
  16. Translating the Scriptures
  17. Sorrow Upon Sorrow
  18. An International Impasse
  19. The Great Fire
  20. After Fifteen Years
  21. Two Years in England
  22. In Stress and Storm
  23. All Manner of Service
  24. Missionary Reinforcement
  25. A Painful Parting
  26. Faithful unto Death
  27. Unfading Glory
  28. Epilogue
  29. Appendices
  30. Index

Author’s Preface

“The pioneer is forgotten” wrote Robert Morrison in a fit of depression. To him in his lonely post it seemed so, but the statement is not true for all time. The pioneer, like the prophet, may be despised or even slain by his contemporaries, but posterity will build his tomb. In Morrison’s case he lived to be honoured beyond most missionaries, and time has only added lustre to his name.

It is fitting that his life and work should be again recalled, for a new and promising chapter in the evangelization of China has commenced. The Christian Church which Morrison set forth to found in the land of Sinim has lately claimed the right to administer her own affairs where able to do so. The great gulf between a land with no followers of Christ – we speak of the Protestant Church alone – and a land with a Church strong enough to desire self-government, has, thank God, been bridged. On the one side of that great span stands Morrison, the dauntless master-builder, and on the other side the first National Christian Conference which met at Shanghai less than two years ago.

Page ix

Robert Morrison, Pioneer of Missions to China

William John Townsend [1835-1915], Robert Morrison, The Pioneer of Chinese MissionsRobert Morrison (1782-1834) was a Presbyterian missionary to China. He is notable for his translation and subsequent widespread distribution of a Chinese Bible and for his Chinese Dictionary. He is often called the “Father of Anglo-Chinese Literature”. My thanks to Redcliffe College for providing a copy of this book for digitisation. This title is in the public domain.

William John Townsend [1835-1915], Robert Morrison, The Pioneer of Chinese Missions. London: Pickering & Inglis, [n.d.]. Hbk. pp.184. [Click to visit the download page]

Contents

  • Preface
  1. Introductory
  2. Childhood and Youth
  3. Preparation For the Great Work
  4. Initial Life and Work in China
  5. Persecution – Dr. Milne
  6. Visit To Peking – Malacca College
  7. Bible Completed – Death of Milne
  8. Work in England – Return To China
  9. Renewed Labour – Closing Scenes
  10. What He Was – What He Did

Chapter 1: Introductory

“O rock, rock, when wilt thou open? ” exclaimed the apostolic Xavier, as he lay burning with fever on an island off the coast of China in 1552. Similar ardent longings have stirred the souls of consecrated Christian workers during many periods of the Church’s history. But China remained a sealed rock to Christian effort until about the middle of the last century. No one can be surprised that it has attracted to itself a variety of interest, and especially that it should enkindle the enthusiasm of the Christian missionary. The tenacious life which has prolonged itself for upwards of four thousand years, and has survived the tempests of time-which have carried down into utter destruction the great empires of antiquity, Egypt, Assyria, Babylon, Persia, Greece, and Rome-stamps the Chinese as a peculiar people, and invests them with a halo of romance well calculated to fire the imagination of the adventurous spirit….