Deaville Walker’s Biography of William Carey

William Carey: Frontipiece
William Carey: Frontipiece

Walker’s biography of the great missionary pioneer William Carey [1761-1834] is based on the older works by J.C. Marshman (1859) and Eustace Carey (1836)., but adds new material from his own research. My thanks to the Cambridge Centre for Christianity Worldwide for making a copy of this title available for digitisation. This book is in th public domain.

F. Deaville Walker [1878-1945], William Carey. Missionary Pioneer and Statesman. London: Student Christian Movement, 1926. Hbk. pp.320. [Click to visit the download page]

Contents

  • Editorial Note
  • Author’s Preface
  1. Childhood in the Weavers’ Cottage
  2. Boyhood at the Village School
  3. The Shoemaker’s Apprentice
  4. Early Work as a Voluntary Preacher
  5. Moulton and the Missionary Call
  6. Leicester: Days of Trial and Conflict
  7. The Enquiry: Carey’s First Great Achievement
  8. The Formation of the Baptist Missionary Society
  9. Planning the Campaign
  10. Facing the Problems
  11. The Voyage to India
  12. India When Carey Landed
  13. Arrival in India: Dark Days
  14. Into the Wilderness
  15. Mudnabatty – Carey’s Second Apprenticeship
  16. Planning a Forward Movement
  17. A Refuge Under the Danish Flag
  18. A Wonderful Year At Serampore: The Mission Established
  19. Converts, Trials, and Progress
  20. Carey Becomes a College Professor
  21. Service for Humanity
  22. The Greatest Fight of All
  23. The Scriptures in Forty Languages
  24. Founding a College
  25. Sorrow Upon Sorrow
  26. Carey’s Private Life at Serampore
  27. “Not a Single Desire Ungratified”

Index

Author’s Preface

William Carey’s life-work falls into two distinct periods: the English period when, almost singlehanded, he faced and overcame the prevailing indifference and hostility to missionary effort, thought out a well-developed scheme, published his amazing “Enquiry,” and in the end almost compelled timid and hesitating men to form a Society for the evangelization of the world; and the Indian period, during which he put his ideas into practice, developing almost every form of missionary agency, translating the Scriptures into numerous languages, founding a splendid Christian college, and winning the confidence of one Governor-General after another. From being a simple shoemaker and village preacher, this man became so skilled a linguist that at the age of forty he was appointed Professor of Bengali, Sanskrit, and Marathi in the Governor-General’s college in Calcutta-a post he filled with distinction for thirty years…

For more material on William Carey, go here.

Missions in India from AD 193-1893 by George Smith

George Smith [1833-1919], The Conversion of India. From Pantaenus to the Present Day. A.D. 193-1893George Smith sets out to provide a history of Christian Missions in India from the time of Pantaenus (one of the leading lights of the Catechetical school of Alexandria who died c.200 AD) up to his own time. My thanks to the Cambridge Centre For Christianity Worldwide for providing me with a copy to digitise. This title is in the public domain.

George Smith [1833-1919], The Conversion of India. From Pantaenus to the Present Day. A.D. 193-1893. New York: Young People’s Missionary Movement, 1893. Hbk. pp.258. [Click to download complete title in PDF]

Contents

  • Preface
  1. Introduction
  2. The Greek Attempt
  3. The Roman Attempt
  4. Francis Xavier and His Successors – The Dutch Attempt
  5. The British East India Company’s Work of Preparation
  6. Great Britain’s Attempt
  7. The United States of America’s Co-operation
  8. The Methods of the Evangelical Mission to India
  9. The Results of Christian Missions to India
  10. The Prospects of the Conversion of India
  11. Intercession and Thanksgiving
  • Appendix
  • Index

Introduction

The first of the Churches of the Reformation to become missionary was that of the Netherlelands. The Dutch colony of New Netherlands, in North America, lasted from the year 1609 to 1664. In 1628 the first congregation was organised on Manhattan Island, now New York. That was the earliest to work among the Red Indians. The organization which is now known as the Reformed Church in America, has furthermore established one of the most remarkable missions in British India, the Arcot Mission. In 1888 one of the elders of that Church, Mr. Nathan F. Graves, of Syracuse, N. Y., wrote to the late L. W. V. B. Mabon, D.D., Professor in its Theological Seminary, New Brunswick, N. J.: “I understand there is no Seminary or Professorship of Missions in the United States.” [Continue reading]

George Smith’s 1887 Biography of William Carey

This is George Smith’s biography of the Father of Modern Missions, William Carey. Smith devotes a significant part of the book to enumerating Carey’s achievements, as a linguist, a Bible translator, as a pioneer in agriculture and horticulture (which I was not aware of before), as an educator and advocate of missions.

My thanks to Redcliffe College for providing a copy of this book for digitisation. This title is in the public domain.

George Smith [1833-1919], The Life of William Carey, D.D. Shoemaker and Missionary, 2nd ednGeorge Smith [1833-1919], The Life of William Carey, D.D. Shoemaker and Missionary, 2nd edn. London: John Murray, 1887. Hbk. pp.389. [Click to download complete book in PDF]

Contents

Preface

Preface to Second Edition

  1. Carey’s College
  2. The Birth of England’s Foreign Missions
  3. India as Catrey Found It
  4. Six Years in North Bengal – Missionary and Indigo Planter
  5. The New Crusade – Serampore and the Brotherhood
  6. The First Native Converts and Christian Schools
  7. Calcutta and the Mission Centres From Dehli to Amboyna
  8. Carey’s Family and Friends
  9. Professor of Sanskrit, Bengali and Marathi
  10. The Wiclif of the East – Bible Translation
  11. What Carey Did For Literature and For Humanity
  12. What Carey Did For Science – Founder of the Agricultural and Horticultural Society of India
  13. Carey’s Immediate Influence in Great Britain amd America
  14. Carey as an Educator – The First Christian College in the East
  15. Carey’s Last Days

Index

Preface

On the death of William Carey in 1834 Dr. Joshua Marsh-man promised to write the Life of his great colleague, with whom he had held almost daily converse since the beginning of the century, but he survived too short a time to begin the work. As a writer of culture, in full sympathy and frequent correspondence with Carey, the Rev. Christopher Anderson, of Edinburgh, was even better fitted for the task. In 1836 the Rev. Eustace Carey anticipated him by issuing what is little better than a selection of mutilated letters and journals made at the request of the Committee of the Baptist Missionary Society. It contains one passage of value, however. [Continue reading]

William Carey: A Biography (1853)

Joseph Belcher, William Carey: A Biography.Joseph Belcher’s 1853 biography of William Carey was intended to be a more attractive, concise and readable work than that produced by Carey’s nephew, the Rev Eustace Carey. The latter work, the first biography of this subject, was regarded as heavy going, even by the standards of the day. My thanks to Redcliffe College for providing me with a copy of the book for digitisation. This title is in the public domain.

Joseph Belcher, William Carey: A Biography. Philadelphia: American Baptist Publication Society, 1853. Hbk. pp.306. [Click to download complete volume in PDF]

Preface

The question may, probably, be asked by some who take up this volume, Why publish a new life of a man who has been dead nearly twenty years? And especially, when a former Memoir, written by an able ex-missionary, a near relative of its subject, and personally acquainted with him, has been extensively circulated? Allow me, gentle reader, to write a few words in reply.

WILLIAM CAREY is one of the names which no section of the Christian church will ever permit to die. The pioneer, of modern missionaries, he strikingly illustrates the grace of God in his own personal history, and shows us the kind of agency which God usually employs in accomplishing the designs of his mercy to our fallen world. His example presents great encouragement to Christians of every class to labor for God, while it exhibits the spirit. and temper in which all services for the highest interests of the world must be accomplished. The life of CAREY will always be kept before the church of Christ; and no objection to two biographies of this extraordinary man can be made, so long as we have more than one of the illustrious MILTON, of the never-dying BUNYAN, of the zealous WHITEFIELD, or of the immortal WASHINGTON. [Continue reading]

Yarns on Heroes of India

J. Claverdon Wood, Yarns on Heroes of India, 5th edn.Yarns on India is a collection of inspiration talks intended for 12-16 year old boys attending Boys’ Brigade meetings. It includes material on William, Carey Alexander Duff, Theordore Pennell and number of other missionaries. My thanks to Redcliffe College for making a copy o this book available for scanning and to the Church Mission Society for their kind permission to place it on-line.

J. Claverdon Wood, Yarns on Heroes of India, 5th edn. London: Church Missionary Society, 1922. Pbk. pp.95. [Click to download complete book in PDF]

Contents

  • Foreword
  • Map of India
  1. Given to the Flames – William Carey
  2. Cast Up by the Sea – Alexander Duff
  3. A Massacre That Made a Man Think – Shekh Salih
  4. Cursed by a Brahman – Subrahmaniam
  5. A Mountain Tiger in His Den – Theodore Pennell
  6. A Fight With Death – Emilie Posnett
  7. Making Men Out of Jellyfish – Tyndale-Biscoe
  8. The Wolf of Attock – Dilawur Khan
  9. A Soldier of Nepal – “Nepali”

Foreword

“YARNS ON HEROES OF INDIA” is the third of a series of text-books prepared for those who work among boys aged twelve to sixteen. It is thus specially suitable for Boys’ Brigade Officers and Scoutmasters. It is written in the belief that stories of missionary adventure appeal to the instincts of hero worship and space hunger, which develop in a boy at this age, and will not only create missionary interest, but will also have a powerful influence in the development of Christian character. Such stories represent Christianity in action, and often show the meaning of Bible truths even better than direct lessons on the Bible itself.

The Yarns themselves are historically true. The realistic detail and local colour give accurate setting without doing violence to the essential facts. [Continue reading]

William Carey Pioneer Missionary to India’s Millions

John Brown Myers [1844/45-1915], William Carey. The Shoemaker Who Became "The Father and Founder of Modern Missions"John Brown Myers [1844/45-1915] provides us with a brief biography of William Carey – “The Founder of Modern Missions”. The book includes chapters on Carey’s role as a translator, a philanthropist and a naturalist. My thanks to Redcliffe College for providing me with a copy to digitise. This book is in the public domain.

John Brown Myers [1844/45-1915], William Carey. The Shoemaker Who Became “The Father and Founder of Modern Missions”. Kilmarnock: John Ritchie, [1905]. Hbk. pp.151. [Click to download complete book in PDF]

Contents

Preface

  1. His Early Years
  2. His Life at Moulton and Leicester
  3. He Offers Himself as a Missionary, and Starts for India
  4. First Experiences
  5. Removal to Serampore
  6. The Serampore Mode of Life
  7. Three Important Events
  8. Various Circumstances
  9. Carey as a Translator
  10. Carey as a Philanthropist
  11. Carey as a Naturalist
  12. Carey and Serampore College
  13. Conclusion

Chapter 1: The Early Years

If Thomas Fuller, the author of the “Worthies of England,” himself a Northamptonshire man, had died a century after instead of exactly a century before William Carey was born, he might have written a work restricted to the worthies of his own county, and to those two hundred years, as voluminous and interesting as his well-known folio. From Dryden, whose birthplace, like his own, was the village of Aldwinkle, down to John Clare, who may be regarded as the English Robert Burns, how many celebrities, and that not alone of poet fame, would have received biographical notice! The dwellers in the midland shire may well be proud of the eminent men who have been born upon its soil. [Continue reading]

George Smith’s Short History of Christian Missions

George Smith [1856-1942], Short History of Christian Missions From Abraham and Paul to CareyGeorge Smith’s Short History of Christian Missions provides an overview of Missions from Abraham up to 1901. The treatments are necessarily brief, but should prove of interest to students. The fact that it went though eight editions indicates at the very least that it was considered useful in its day. This book is now in the Public Domain.

George Smith [1856-1942], Short History of Christian Missions From Abraham and Paul to Carey, 8th edn, Livingstone, and Duff. Edinburgh: T & T Clark, n.d. Hbk. pp.252.  [Click to download complete book in PDF]

Contents

Introduction

Part 1: Jadaic Preparation, B.C. 2000 to A.D. 70

1. The Missionary Covenant – Foundation of the City of God in History

2. Judaism the First Missionary Religion

3. Christ the King of the Missionary Host – the Missionary Charge

4. The Holy Spirit the Leader of the Missionary Host

Part 2 – Latin Preparation, A.D. 70 to 1792

5. The Roman Empire Subdued by the City of God

6. The Conversion of the Scots and English

7. The Conversion of the Goths and Franks

8. The Conversion of the Teutons and Northmen

9. Mission to Slavs, Mohammedans, and Jews

10. The Reformation Only Indirectly Missionary

11. The Dawn of Modern Missions – The Danish-Halle and Moravian Missions

12. The Dawn of Modern Missions – The English in North America and in India

13. The Missionary Compromise of the Latin Church with Heathenism

Part 3 – English-Speaking Universal Evangelization, 1792-1913

14. Foundation of English Missions – William Carey the First English Missionary to India, 1791-1834

15. The Great Missionary and Bible Societies, 1792

17. The Churches Become Missionary, 1830

18. Evangelical Missions and Mankind

Index

 

William Carey’s Enquiry on-line

An Enquiry into the Obligation of Christians to Use MEans For the Conversion of the Heathen by William CareyWilliam Carey’s Enquiry into the Obligation of Christians… is probably one of the most influential documents in the history of missions. Among other things it led to the founding of the Baptist Missionary Society in the United Kingdom. This is a facsimile of the original which was published in Leicester 1792.

William Carey [1761-1834], An Enquiry into the Obligations of Christians to Use Means For the Conversion of the Heathens in Which the State of the Different Nations of the World, the Success of Former Undertakings, and the Practicability of Further Undertakings, are Considered. Leicester: Ann Ireland, 1792. Hbk. pp.87. Click to download in PDF.

Contents

  1. An Enquiry whether the Commission given by our Lord to his Disciples be not binding on us
  2. Containing a Short Review of former Undertakings for the Conversion of the Heathen
  3.  Containing a Survey of the Present State of the World
  4. The Practicability of something being done, more than what is done, for the Conversion of the Heathen
  5. An Enquiry into the Duty of Christians in general, and what Means ought to be used, in order to promote this Work

Introduction

As our blessed Lord has required us to pray that his kingdom may come, and his will be done on earth as it is in heaven, it becomes us not only to express our desires of that event by words, but to use every-lawful method to spread the knowledge of his name. In order to this, it is necessary that we should become, in some measure acquainted with the religious state of the world; and as this is an object we should be prompted to pursue, not only by the gospel of our Redeemer, but even by the feelings of humanity, so an inclination to conscientious activity therein would form one of the strongest proofs that we are the subjects of grace, and partakers of that spirit of universal benevolence and genuine philanthropy, which appear so eminent in the character of God himself. [Continue reading]