Biography of Archibald Orr Ewing

Archibald Orr Ewing [1857-1930]
Archibald Orr Ewing [1857-1930]

Archibald Orr Ewing [1857-1930] was born into a wealthy family in Scotland. Deeply influenced by his experience of the revival in Glasgow led by D.L. Moody in 1882 and by attending the Keswick Convention in 1885 he devoted himself to missionary service. He served with the China Inland Mission from 1886 to 1911.

My thanks to Book Aid for making a copy of this public domain title available for digitisation.

Marshall Broomhall [1866-1937], Archibald Orr Ewing. ‘That faithful and wise Steward’. London: China Inland Mission, 1930. Hbk. pp.150. [Click to visit the download page]

Contents

  • Foreword
  • A Celebrated Lawsuit
  • Things Temporal
  • Things Eternal
  • A Living Gospel
  • A Willing Servant
  • A Living Sacrifice
  • A Comforter of Many
  • A Cheerful; Giver
  • A Man in Christ
  • A Better Possession
  • Epilogue

Foreword

There are many men and women who have gladly devoted their lives to the mission field; there are many others who have generously given of their substance for the same cause; but only a few have been privileged to do both. Archibald Orr Ewing was one of these few. Though as a young man he inherited wealth, and had this world’s best before him, he definitely, unostentatiously, and wholly placed himself and his possessions on God’s altar for service.

Every soul is a sanctuary, and its true history can, at best, only be known in part by others. ‘The secret things belong unto the Lord our God; but the things that are revealed belong unto us and to our children for ever.’ That so much can be revealed of the inner history of Archibald Orr Ewing’ s life is due to the wealth of material placed at the writer’s disposal…

Page vii.

History of the Bible in China by Marshall Broomhall

Marshall Broomhall [1866-1937], The Bible in China

Marshall Broomhall provides a history of the translation of the forty versions of the Bible that were available in China by 1934. My thanks to Redcliffe College for providing a copy of this public domain title for digitisation.

Marshall Broomhall [1866-1937], The Bible in China. London: The China Inland Mission, 1934. Hbk. pp.190. [Click here to visit the download page]

Contents

  • Foreword
  • Our Obligations
  • By Way of Introduction

Part 1: The Bible in Preparation

  • Nestorian Pioneers
  • Under the Great Khans
  • In the Footsteps of Xavier
  • A New Force in Old China
  • Morrison and Marshman
  • The Delegates; Version
  • Gutzlaff and the Taiping Rebels
  • The People’s Bible
  • Unon Versions
  • Chinise Dialects
  • For the Tribes
  • The Scriptures in Manchu
  • Among the Mongols

Part 2: The Bible in Action

  • The Colporteur’s Task
  • The Colporteur’s Reward
  • Wise unto Salvation
  • The Power of the Word

Part 3: The Bible a Uniting Force

  • A Great Fellowship

Appendices

  • The Nestorian Tablet
  • List of Versions and Translations

Foreword

It is one hundred years since Robert Morrison died in China, and one hundred and twenty years since his Chinese translation of the New Testament was published. It is not unfitting that the centenary of Morrison’s death should see the remarkable story of the Bible in China published. It seems somewhat strange that this has not been done before. And now, by one of those unexpected coincidences which do occur, two records are being issued at the same time. On the very day on which we write this foreword-the whole book being finished-we have received from China a copy of the Rev. A. J. Garnier’s brochure of some eighty pages, entitled Chinese Versions of the Bible. Happily the two efforts do not clash.

Mr. Garnier’s concise pamphlet has been prepared, as his preface states, to be the basis of a Chinese Appendix to his translation of Professor G. Milligan’s The New Testament and its Transmission…

p.vii.

Story of Monorom, the Paddy Field Hospital in Thailand

Catherine Maddox, Paddy Field Hospital. A Story from Manorom, Thailand.The railway that runs hundreds.of miles up the Malayan Peninsula from Singapore to Bangkok proceeds from there to its destination near the border of Burma through the great central plain which is the rice-bowl of Thailand. It was to this well populated area, intersected by numerous waterways, that a little group of C.I.M. missionaries, recently out from China, went in 1952. Its friendly courteous people, Buddhists all, welcomed the strangers (if not their message) who had come to dwell among them, and it was here that the principal medical work of the C.I.M. Overseas Missionary Fellowship was commenced.

In this book Dr. Catherine Maddox, wife of the doctor superintendent of the medical work, gives an intimate history of the way in which the Christian Hospital was planted in the paddy fields of Central Thailand.

[From the front dustjacket]

My thanks to Book Aid for providing a copy of this book to digitisation and to OMF International-UK for their kind permission to place it on-line. The PDF of this title may be reproduced for free educational purposes, but not sold for profit without written permission from the copyright holder.

Catherine Maddox, Paddy Field Hospital. A Story from Manorom, Thailand. London: China Inland Mission, [1961], Hbk. pp.183. [Click to visit the download page]

Contents

  1. Doubt
  2. Certainty
  3. Background
  4. Spadework
  5. Plans
  6. Building
  7. Expansion
  8. Compound
  9. Garden
  10. Opening
  11. Business Manager
  12. Staff (a)
  13. Staff (b)
  14. Nurses
  15. Departments (a)
  16. Departments (b)
  17. Homes
  18. Events
  19. Fields
  20. Evangelism (a)
  21. Evangelism (b)
  22. Follow-up
  23. Cases (a)
  24. Cases (b)
  25. Dykes
  26. Floods
  27. Harvest

About the author – Catherine Maddox, M.B., B.S.

As a child, the author wanted to be a missionary, and she took up medicine with this in mind. In 1938 she sailed for China with the China Inland Mission, devoting herself to medical and evangelistic work in the provinces of Honan, Anhwei and Szechwan. In 1946 she married Dr. F. C. Maddox. Her earlier book The Invincible Company was written while in China. Following the enforced withdrawal of the C.I.M. from that land, the Drs. Maddox went to Thailand, where to-day they are serving God in the Christian Hospital at Manorom.

From the back dustjacket

Snapshot of China and Chinese Missions from 1907

Marshall Broomhall [1866-1937], The Chinese Empire. A General and Missionary Survey.This is an extremely detailed province-by-province survey of Chinese life and the progress of Christian missions there up to 1907. It is written by multiple authors who each had personal experience of the region they wrote about.

This title is in the public domain. My thanks to Redcliffe College for making a copy available for digitisation.

Marshall Broomhall [1866-1937], The Chinese Empire. A General and Missionary Survey. London: Morgan & Scott, [1907]. Hbk. pp.472. [Click to visit the download page]

Contents

  • Preface by The Rt. Hon. Sir Ernest Satow, G.C.M.G
  • Editor’s Preface
  • Introduction by Marshall Broomhall. Geography; Early Nestorian Missions; First Roman Catholic Effort; Second Roman Catholic Effort. Protestant Missions: Period of Preparation, 1807-1842; Period of the Ports, 1842-1860; Period of Penetration, 1860-1877; Period of Progress, Persecution, and Prosperity, 1878-1907.
  • The Province of Kwagtung by The Rev. J. Campbell Gibson, M.A., D.D. English Presbyterian Mission. Arrived In China 1874.
  • The Province of Fukien by The Rev. Llewellyn Lloyd, Church Missionary Society. Arrived In China 1876.
  • The Island of Formosa by The Rev. Thomas Barclay, M.A., English Presbyterian. Mission. Arrived In China 1874.
  • The Province of Chekiang by the Ven. Archdeacon A. E. Moule, B.D., Church Missionary Society. Arrived In China 1861.
  • The Province of Kiangsu by Rev. John Darroch, Translator For Shansi Imperial University. Arrived In China 1887.
  • The Province of Shantung by Mr. C. F. Hogg. Arrived In China 1884.
  • The Province of Chihli by The Rev. Thomas Bryson, London Missionary Society. Arrived In China 1866.
  • The Province of Hupeh by The Rev. Arnold Foster, B.A., London Missionary Society. Arrived In China 1871.
  • The Province of Kiangsi By Mr. Archibald Orr-Ewing, China Inland Mission. Arrived In China 1886.
  • The Province of Anhwei by The Rev. J. J. Coulthard, China Inland Mission. Arrived In China 1879.
  • The Province of Honan by G. Whitfield Guinness, B.A., M.B., China Inland Mission. Arrived In China 1897.
  • The Province of Hunan By Mr. A. H. Harris, Late Acting Commissioner of Customs, Changsha. Arrived In China 1883.
  • The Province of Kansu by Marshall Broomhall, In China 1890-1899.
  • The Province of Shensi by Marshall Broomhall, In China 1890-1899.
  • The Province of Shansi by Mr. Albert Lutley, China Inland Mission, Arrived In China 1887,
  • The Province of Szechwan by Mr. Jushu-A Vale, China Inland Mission. Arrived In China. 1887.
  • The Province of Yunnan by The Rev. John M’carthy, China Inland Mission. Arrived In China 1867.
  • The Province of Kweichow by The Rev. Samuel Clarke, China Inland Mission. Arrived In China 1878.
  • The Province of Kwangsi by The Rev. Louis Byrde, B.A., Church Missionary Society. Arrived In China 1898.
  • The Province of Sinkiang by Mr. George Hunter, China Inland Mission. Arrived In China 1889.
  • Manchuria by The Rev. J. W. Inglis, M.A., United Free Church of Scotland. Arrived In Manchuria in 1890.
  • Tibet by Mr. Cecil Polhill, China Inland Mission. Arrived In China 1885.
  • Mongolia by Marshall Broomhall. And Supplementary Section on Work For the Mongols At Kalgan, By Rev. J. H. Roberts, American Board of C.F.M. Arrived In China 1877.
  • The Bible in the Chinese Empire by Marshall Broomhall; Based on Material Supplied by the British and Foreign Bible Society.
  • Appendices
    I. Philology
    II. The Jews in China
    Ill. Introduction of Christianity Into China
    IV. Biographical Outlines
  • Indices
    I. Chronological
    II. General
    III. Missionary Societies
  • IV. Biographical or Personal
    V. Topographical

First 100 Years of Protestant Missions in Japan

Dorothy Pape, Captives of the Mighty. Christ and the Japanese Enigma

Protestant Christianity did not reach Japan until 1859, and during these 100 years the progress of the church has been comparatively slow. These are even now only about a quarter of a million converts in a population of over 90 million. This book seeks to explain many of the peculiar difficulties created by a unique and mystifying culture, which face the missionary and Japanese Christian there. It is written out of a burning desire to further the cause of Christ in a nation which is of the greatest strategic importance in the Far East and which aspires to be the bridge between nations of the East and the West.

To divide this book into two parts is logical. One part deals with the general culture and religious background of Japan, while the second tells the story of the outworking of the Christian faith in the lives of the Japanese. All readers will not necessarily want to commence with the first half; some readers may prefer to read the second half first.

From the dust jacket.

This title is copyright OMF International UK and is reproduced here by permission. You can download this book for free educational purposes. It must not be reublished for profir without explicit written permission from the copyright holder. My thanks to Book Aid for providing a copy of this book for digitisation.

Dorothy Pape, Captives of the Mighty. Christ and the Japanese Enigma. London: China Inland Mission, 1959. Hbk. pp.303. [Click to visit the download page]

Contents

Preface

Part I: The Enviroment – Cultural Background

1. A People Unveiled
2. The Imprisoning Web
3. The Spirit of Japan (1) Its Origin
4. The Spirit of Japan (2) Its Modrn Guise
5. Other Gods of Shinto
6. Pale Moonlight of Buddhism
7. A Pseudo Salvation-ny-Faith
8. The Sense of Sin
9. The Fer of Death
10. The Japanese Language – The Art of Concealing Thought
11. A Blunted Sword
12. Black Lily of Resentment
13. Meeting of East and West

Part II. The Preaching of Release

14. With Long Patience
15. Tent Evangelism
16. The Northern Island
17. North Glory Church
18. Hidaka Coast
19. Samani – By-path Meadow
20. Aomori – The Gospel in the Capital
21. In Cities Old and New
22. In Quiet Country Towns
23. Thirst for Knowledge
24. Bruised Reeds
25. Hope For the Future

Glossary
Bibliography

By Love Compelled – The Call of the China Inland Mission by Marshall Broomhall

Marshall Broomhall [1866-1937], By Love Compelled. The Call of the China Inland MissionMarshall Broomhall served as Editorial Secretary for the China Inland Mission for 27 years and was a nephew of its founder, James Hudson Taylor. In This little book, published shortly before his death, he provides what he describes as a sketch of the mission’s work in China. My thanks to Redcliffe College for providing a copy of this book for digitisation. This title is in the public domain.

Marshall Broomhall [1866-1937], By Love Compelled. The Call of the China Inland Mission. London: Hodder & Stoughton, 1936. Pbk. pp.126.[Click to download complete book in PDF]

Contents

  • Foreword
  • Author’s Preface
  • An Outlet for Love
  • Love Finds a Way
  • Love’s Adventure
  • Love Laughs at Rough Places
  • Love Suffers
  • Love Undaunted
  • Love’s Enthusiasm
  • Love, Strong as Death
  • Love’s Reward
  • Love’s Opportunity
  • Love Tested
  • Love Amid Distress
  • Love Undismayed
  • Love’s Courage
  • Love Unfeigned
  • Love Pressed on Every Side
  • Love’s Ordeal
  • Love’s Reply
  • Love at All Costs
  • Knit Together in Love

Author’s Preface

Sir Joshua Reynolds, in his Discourses, has told us that “the general idea constitutes real excellence. All smaller things, however excellent in their way, are to be sacrificed without mercy to the greater.” This has been our aim. In this short sketch of the China Inland Mission, the writer has sought to give a living picture of the work and of the field. Details have been sacrificed without mercy. Personal names and Chinese place-names have been omitted, unless absolutely essential to the story. The letter has been subordinated to the spirit. Why Love has been taken as the motif of the little book, the first chapter will suffice to explain.

This little volume is a sketch rather than a chronicle. Such facts as have been related have been selected as typical of others which have had to be omitted. Though necessarily incomplete, we trust that this miniature will be found a true interpretation of the whole. [Continue reading]

China Inland Mission School at Chefoo

Stanley Houghton, Edith B. Harman & Margaret Pyle, Chefoo.

“The Chefoo School (traditional Chinese: 芝罘學校; simplified Chinese: 芝罘学校; pinyin: Zhīfú Xuéxiào; Wade–Giles: Chih-fu Hsüeh-hsiao), also known as Protestant Collegiate School or China Inland Mission School, was a Christian boarding school established by the China Inland Mission—under James Hudson Taylor—at Chefoo (Yantai), in Shandong province in northern China, in 1880. Its purpose was to provide an education for the children of foreign missionaries and the foreign business and diplomatic communities in China.” – Wikipedia

This book tells the story of the Chefoo school from the time of its foundation to the 1920s. My thanks to OMF International-UK for their kind permission to place the book on-line and to Redcliffe College for providing me with a copy to scan. This book is copyright OMF International-UK.

Stanley Houghton, Edith B. Harman & Margaret Pyle, Chefoo. London: The China Inland Mission, 1931. Pbk. pp.82. [Click to download complete book in PDF]

Contents

  • Foreword
  • Editor’s Note

Part I – Today by Stanley Houghton, B.A.

  • Foundation Day
  • The School
  • The Memoerial Hall
  • Behind the Scenes
  • Some Difficulties

Part II – Yesterday by Edith B. Harman

  • 1881
  • 1888
  • 1895
  • 18900
  • 1908
  • 1910-1911
  • 1911-1912
  • 1914-1918

Part III – Its Tomorrow’s by Margaret Pyle

  • Its Tomorrows

APPENDIX

  • What I Owe to Chefoo

Foreword

“Little is much if God is in it.” Who, fifty years ago, looking at that class of three boys, gathered in a small room in the doctor’s house, could have foretold what great proportions would be attained from such a small beginning? But “with God all things are possible”, and to-day, in this our Jubilee Year, we thank God for His grace given to Mr. Hudson Taylor and Mr. Elliston that they did not “despise the day of small things”, for to them and to each member of the China Inland Mission, in the succeeding years, has been given the joy of watching the expansion of the work. They have not needed to wait for the time of rejoicing until maturity had been reached. [Continue reading]

In Memory of Hudson Taylor

Marshall Broomhall [1866-1937], ed., In Memoriam: Rev. J. Hudson Taylor M.R.C.S. Beloved Founder and Director of the China Inland MissionThis book is a collection of addresses made at Hudson Taylor’s Memorial service at the Conference Hall in Mildmay, London in 1905. He was a man who touched thousands of lives for Christ, and this is reflected in the reminiscences of those who knew him well.

My thanks to OMF International-UK for their kind permission to places this book on-line and to Redcliffe College for providing a copy for digitisation. This book is copyright OMF International-UK.

Marshall Broomhall [1866-1937], ed., In Memoriam: Rev. J. Hudson Taylor M.R.C.S. Beloved Founder and Director of the China Inland Mission. London: China Inland Mission, 1905. Hbk. pp.104. [Click to download complete book in PDF]

Contents

  • In Memoriam – Poem. By Dr. A.T. Pierson
  • Reminiscences. By B. Broomhall
  • Memorial Service: Programme
  • Memorial Service: Representatives
  • Address. By Theodore Howard, Esq.
  • Address. By J.E. Mathieson, Esq.
  • Address. By Eugene Stock, Esq.
  • Address. By Rev. John Sharp
  • Address. By Rev. R. Wardlaw Thompson
  • Address. By Dr. Harry Guiness
  • Address. By W.B. Sloan, Esq.
  • Tribute. By Dr. Arthur T. Pierson
  • Letters: Personal and Official
  • Press Notices

Preface

To many thousands of persons the news of Mr. Hudson Taylor’s Home-call has come as a personal sorrow. As a leader and teacher, one of the most prominent features in his life has been the power to create a  bond of esteem and affection between himself and others. His loyalty to God and to His cause, together with the largeness of his sympathies, have gained for him a large circle of friends among the choicest of God’s people all over the world.

In the belief that to many of these a  small “In Memoriam” volume would be welcome, this little book has been compiled. [Continue reading]

God’s Deliverance from the Boxer Uprising

Alexander R. Saunders, A God of Deliverances. The Story of the Marvellous Deliverances Through the Sovereign Power of God of a Party of Missionaries, When Compelled by the Boxer Rising to Flee From Shan-Si, North ChinaThe Boxer Uprising (a.k.a. the Yihequan Movement) of 1899-1901 was  one to the darkest  hours for missionaries in China. This little book recounts how some of the China Inland Mission workers were able to escape the hands of the Boxers. My thanks to OMF International-UK for their kind permission to place this book on-line and to Redcliffe College for providing a copy to scan. This title is copyright OMF International-UK.

Alexander R. Saunders, A God of Deliverances. The Story of the Marvellous Deliverances Through the Sovereign Power of God of a Party of Missionaries, When Compelled by the Boxer Rising to Flee From Shan-Si, North China. London: China Inland Mission, [1901]. Hbk. pp.88. [Click to download complete book in PDF]

Contents

  • Preface by Rev J. Hudson Taylor, M.R.C.S., F.R.G.S.
  1. Before the Riot
  2. The Flight to the Yamen
  3. Within a Step of Death
  4. Our Second Riot
  5. A Spectacle to Men and to Angels
  6. Prisoners of the Lord
  7. Two Martyrs
  8. Wonders at the Yellow River
  9. Sorrow Upon Sorrow
  10. Safe Home at Last

Chapter 1 0 – Before the riot

”Beloved, think it not strange concerning the fiery trial which is to try you.”-1 Peter iv. 12.

The city of P’ing-yao was opened as a station by the China Inland Mission in 1888. Being the banking centre for China, its position is important, and it subsequently became the business centre for the C.I.M. in Central Shan-si. During the twelve years of missionary work in this station, 133 persons have been baptized. With these Christians organised under eight separate congregations, all paying their own expenses, and in two cases with chapels mort-gaged by native contributions, and with nearly 100 candidates waiting for baptism, the Lord’s work had never seemed more encouraging than just prior to the Boxer rising.

In consequence of information received concerning the Boxer troubles in Shan-tong, I was led, during the earlier part of the year, to speak much to the Christians on the subject of persecution and affliction for Christ’s sake, and one cannot but praise God for having been led so to do. [Continue reading]

China Inland Mission’s Witness to the Faithfulness of God

Marshall Broomhall [1866-1937], Our Seal. Being The Witness of the China Inland Mission to The Faithfulness of God.This book is a celebration of God’s faithfulness as demonstrated in the work of the China Inland Mission. My thanks to Redcliffe College for providing me with a copy to scan. This volume is in the Public Domain.

Marshall Broomhall [1866-1937], Our Seal. Being The Witness of the China Inland Mission to The Faithfulness of God. London: China Inland Mission, 1933. Hbk. pp.173. [Click to download complete volume in PDF]

Contents

By Way of Introduction

Part 1

Our Seal
God the Builder
Rock Foundations
The Building

Part 2

The Test of Time
The Test of Emergencies
Tests Extraordinary in Great Britain
Tests Extraordinary in North America
Tests Extraordinary in China
The Test of Exchange
The Test of War

Part 3

Some Personal Testimonies
The Half Not Told
Nothing Impossible
Appendix

Our Seal

Our seals set to, that God is true.

Hudson Taylor, towards the close of a long and strenuous life, when speaking at the last, Annual Meetings of the China Inland Mission he ever attended, gave utterance to the following significant words:

‘I have sometimes met people who said: “Trusting God is a beautiful theory, but it won’t work”. Well, thank God, it has worked, and it does work. I remember a dear friend, an aged minister in London, who said to me in the year 1866: “You are making a great mistake in going to China with no organization behind you. We live in a busy world, and you will all he forgotten, and the Mission won’t live seven years.” That [said Hudson Taylor] was the prophecy of this good man-and a wise one too. But he was mistaken.’

It is more than thirty-two years since Hudson Taylor gave this striking testimony in Toronto, and it is more than sixty-six years since that aged minister in London uttered his mournful prediction. Time has amply justified Hudson Taylor’s faith in and obedience to God. And every subsequent trial and perplexity has only served to make the faithfulness of God more plain and manifest.

It is now seventy years since James Meadows joined Hudson Taylor as the first member of that new organization which three years later was to become known as the China Inland Mission. The foundations of this new work were the Promises of God. Hudson Taylor had nothing else to build on. For seventy long and exacting years those pledges of God’s love have been subjected to the severest tests that life can command. They have not been found wanting. A thousand promises have declared and still declare God’s ‘constancy of love’. And ten thousand experiences proclaim that God’s Word is ‘unalterably sure’. [Continue Reading]