History of Baptist Medical Missions

R. Fletcher Moorshead [1874-1934], "Heal The Sick". The Story of the Medical Auxiliary of the Baptist Missionary SocietyThis book was written for the occasion of 25th anniversary of the Medical Missions Auxilliary of the Baptist Missionary Society. The Appendices helpfully document the names and dates of those who served as medical missionaries from 1793 to 1928. My thanks to Redcliffe College for providing me with a copy to digitise. This book is in the Public Domain.

R. Fletcher Moorshead [1874-1934], “Heal The Sick”. The Story of the Medical Auxiliary of the Baptist Missionary Society. London: The Carey Press, [1929]. Hbk. pp.224. [Download the complete book in PDF]

Contents

  1. At The Dawn
  2. A Faulty Perspective
  3. A New Beginning
  4. Getting To Work
  5. After Eleven Years
  6. Lengthening the Cords
  7. Strengthening the Stakes
  8. Heroism and Sacrifice
  9. A Medical Mission Nehemiah’s Wall
  10. In the Crucible of War
  11. Through Sorrow to Joy
  12. The Return of the Deputation
  13. A Costly Service
  14. Reaching Out to Greater Things
  15. The Auxiliary Loses Its Life
  16. Under Fire
  17. The Twenty-Fifth Milestone
  18. On the Way to the Jubilee
  19. The Challenge of To-Morrow

Appendix I
Appendix II
Appendix III

Author’s Preface

Two years ago, upon the occasion of the celebration of the semi-jubilee of the Medical Mission Auxiliary, the desire was expressed that some permanent record of the twenty-five years should be compiled. The following pages, written as and when they could be in the scant leisure that it was possible to snatch from the demands of other work, are offered in the hope that their perusal may deepen interest in the work of B.M.S. Medical Missions.

The very fact that the Auxiliary no longer exists as a specific branch of the Society may be held to constitute one reason why its inspiring story should be recorded ere the ceaseless march of events has caused it to be forgotten. A greater reason may be found in the character of the service which here stands revealed. No finer heroism is to be found anywhere than that exhibited by the lives of missionary doctors and nurses, and for the sake of the younger generation in particular, it deserves to betold. A still further reason may be traced in the need, increasingly apparent, to safeguard the distinctive work of Medical Missions from being lost sight of in the more general presentation of the missionary enterprise which has become customary of recent years. [Continue reading]