Twelve Mighty Missionaries by Esthme Ethelind Enock [1874-1947]

Esthme Ethelind Enock [1874-1947], Twelve Mighty MissionariesEsthme Enock’s biographical sketches of 12 famous missionaries has just entered the public domain. This copy was kindly provided by Book Aid for digitisation.

In the table of contents below I have linked to the bibligraphy pages on Missiology.org.uk, where you will find further material on each missionary.

Esthme Ethelind Enock [1874-1947], Twelve Mighty Missionaries. London: Pickering & Inglis, Ltd., 1936. Hbk. pp.95. [Click to visit the download page]

Contents

  1. Pastor Hsi, China
  2. James Chalmers, New Guinea
  3. Alexander Mackay, Uganda
  4. Anthony Norris Groves, India
  5. Alexander Duff, India
  6. John Williams, Erromanga
  7. Samuel Marsden, Maoriland
  8. Samuel Pollard, China
  9. Hudson Taylor, China
  10. C.T. Studd, Central Africa
  11. Dan Crawford, Central Africa
  12. Dr Richard Williams, Tierra Del Fuego

Chapter 1. Pastor Hsi, China

The exact date of Pastor Hsi’s birthday does not seem to be recorded, but he was born probably in the Autumn of 1836. Till he was seven years old the little Hsi lived the usual free life of the son of a Chinese scholar, and was encouraged in every way to be overbearing and self-willed. Then he was sent to school, a school where a shrine of Confucius occupied the place of honour. Here the boy begins the studies which, it is hoped, will make him a “Princely Man.”

But, favourable though circumstances are, they do not satisfy the heart of this boy. At the early age of eight years, as he wandered through the incense-filled Temple and gazed at the hideous idols and vivid representations of punishments and terrors beyond the grave, he would ask himself, what was the use of living. “Men find no good, and in the end—?” he said to himself….

History of the Church Missionary Society by Eugene Stock – 4 Vols

Eugene Stock [1836-1928], The History of the Church Missionary Society. Its Environment, Its Men and Its Work, 4 Vols. Eugene Stock’s comprehensive History of the Church Missionary Society runs to 2,740 pages and 4 Volumes. My thanks to the Cambridge Centre for Christianity Worldwide for providing a set of these volumes to scan. These titles are in the pubic domain.

Eugene Stock [1836-1928], The History of the Church Missionary Society. Its Environment, Its Men and Its Work, 4 Vols. London: Church Missionary Society, 1899-1916. Hbk. pp.504 + 659 + 912 + 665. [Click to visit the download page for this set]

Table of Contents, Volumes 1-3

  • Preface
  • Author’s Preface
  • Outline of the Work
  1. The Great Commission
  2. Missions Before the Reformation
  3. Missions After the Reformation
  4. The Eighteenth Century and the Evangelical Revival
  5. Africa and the East – Waiting
  6. The Missionary Awakening
  7. The New Society and its Early Struggles
  8. The First Missionaries
  9. Africa and India: Struggle and Victory
  10. Forward Steps
  11. Rousing the Country: The Associations
  12. C.M.S. and Other Societies
  13. Sierra Leone: The White Man’s Grave; The Black Man’s Life
  14. The Finished Course
  15. India: Entering the Opened Door
  16. Insular Missions: New Zealand, Ceylon, West India, Malta
  17. The Eastern Churches: Reports for their Revival
  18. The Outlook After Twenty-Five Years
  19. The Personnel of the Period
  20. The Environment of the Period
  21. India: Changes and Development
  22. India: Progress of the Missions
  23. The Negro on Both SIdes the Atlantic, Enslaved and Free
  24. Greek, Copt, Abyssinian, Zulu, Maori, Australian, Cree
  25. Henry Venn; And Survey of Men and Things
  26. The Society and the Church
  27. The Colonial and Missionary Episcopate
  28. New Zealand: The Bishop, the Colony, and the Mission
  29. New Enterprises in Africa: Niger Expedition, Yoruba Mission East Coast
  30. The Opening of China
  31. The Society’s Finances
  32. The Jubilee
  33. The Environment: Church Developments – Anglican
  34. The Environment: Church Developments – Evangelical
  35. The Society at Home
  36. Some Recruits from the Universities
  37. Islington College and its Men
  38. Church Organization: The Church of New Zealand
  39. West Africa: Three Missions and Three Bishops
  40. East Africa: The Missionaries and the Explorers
  41. Jerusalem and Constantinople: Jew, Turk, Christian
  42. India Under Dalhouse; and the Missions in the North
  43. India: The Missions in the South
  44. India: The Punjab – For England and For Christ
  45. India: The Mutiny – Its Victims and its Lessons
  46. India: The Great Controversy – Neutrality or Christianity?
  47. India: Missions After the Mutiny
  48. Ceylon’s Isle
  49. China: In Time of War and Tumults
  50. The Great Lone Land
  51. An Anxious Period: In the Society, and in the Church
  52. The Period: More Church Developments
  53. Salisbury Square
  54. Candidates of the Period
  55. The Native Churches: Self-supporting, Self-governing, Self-extending
  56. Ebb-Tide in Africa
  57. The Niger and its Black Bishop
  58. The Islands: Mauritius and Madagascar
  59. India: Rulers and Bishops of the Period
  60. India: Babus, Brahmos, Borderers
  61. India: Agencies Evangelistic and Pastoral
  62. India: Death and Life
  63. India: A Flag for Christ in the Punjab
  64. China: New Mission and Old
  65. The Land of the Rising Sun
  66. Lands of the Utmost West: Manitoba; Metlakahtla
  67. New Zealand: War, Apostasy, Fidelity
  68. Henry Venn’s Latter Days
  69. The Environment: Church Movements
  70. The Environment: Evangelistic and Spiritual Movements
  71. The Society: Missions, Men, Money
  72. The Society: Home Influence and Organization
  73. Africa: The Flowing Tide Again: Ilala – and After
  74. Uganda: The Call and the Response
  75. The Crescent and the Cross: Missions in Mohammedan Lands
  76. India: Dioceses of Calcutta and Bombay
  77. India: Diocese of Lahore
  78. India: Diocese of Madras
  79. India: The Hill Tribes
  80. India and Ceylon: The Bishops and the Society
  81. The Far East: Advance in China and Japan
  82. The Far West: The Church among the Red Indians
  83. The Epoch of 1880-82
  84. The Environment: Ecclesiastical, Controversial, Spiritual
  85. The Society A New Era of Progress
  86. Three Memorable Years. 1885, 1886, 1887
  87. Controversies Within and Attack from Without
  88. Recruits of the Period: Men and Women
  89. High Hopes and Sore Sorrows: West Africa and the Niger
  90. High Hopes and Sore Sorrows: East Africa and Uganda
  91. British East India; The Company, The Government, and the Missions
  92. India: The Men and their Work
  93. India: Some Features, Episodes, Incidents, and Controversies of the Period
  94. Lands of Islam: Egypt, Palestine, Arabia, Persia
  95. In the Indian and Southern Oceans: Ceylon, Mauritius, New Zealand
  96. China: Onward, Inward, – and Upward
  97. Japan: The Nation, the Mission, the Church
  98. The Red Indian Missions: Patterns of Zeal and Triumphs of Grace
  99. Missions at Congresses and Conferences
  100. Seven Years of the Policy of Faith
  101. The Church, the Society and the Cause
  102. The Society: Candidates, Controbutions, and the Three Years’ Enterprise
  103. The Four Years Abroad: Africa
  104. The Four Years Abroad: Asia
  105. In Memoriam
  106. Repice, Circumspice, Prospice

London Missionary Society – Gleanings From Many Lands

George Cousins [1842-?], Gleanings From Many Fields, 3rd edn.This book represents a summary of the achievements of the London Missionary Society over 100 years since its foundation. It is drawn from accounts of its workers across the all the countries that the L.M.S. had worked in. There are fifty illustrations in this volume. My thanks to Redcliffe College for providing me with a copy of the book to scan. This title is in the public domain.

George Cousins [1842-?], Gleanings From Many Fields, 3rd edn. London: London Missionary Society, 1896. Hbk. pp.216. [Click to download complete book in PDF]

Contents

  • Preface
  1. Natives and Native Ways
  2. Cruel Customs That Christ is Conquering
  3. Child Life and Amusements
  4. Stories of Wild Beasts
  5. Perils by Land and Water
  6. In the Land of Idols
  7. Progress in “The Middle Kingdom”
  8. Light in the Great Dark Continent
  9. Madagascar and the Malagasy
  10. Isles of the Southern Ocean
  11. Rescuing the Negroes of the West Indies
  12. Faithful Unto Death
  13. Native Workers For Christ
  14. Schools and Scholars
  15. Among the Sick and Suffering
  16. Women to the Rescue

Chapter 1: Natives and Native Ways

The South Sea Islanders, like many of their more civilized fellow-creatures, are very fond of feasting. They believe m p1es and puddings quite as much as. you do, and not only at Christmas time, but at all seasons of the year. Theirs, however, are much larger than yours. Fancy a pie ten or twelve feet round! And a roly-poly three hundred feet long, and about as thick as a man’s body! You could not eat many of those Christmas pies, or many slices of those puddings, I am sure! It would not be a very easy matter to make and cook such large pies and puddings in England, but the natives find no difficulty in making or eating them. To make the puddings, they simply dig a trench, fill it with wood, upon which they place stones. [Continue reading]

History of the Melanesian Mission

Eliza Suzanna Armstrong [1836-1908], The History of the Melanesian MissionEliza Susanna Armstrong provides a detailed history of the Melanesian Mission from 1841 to 1899. This region includes what is today Papua New Guinea, Fiji, Vanuatu and the Solomon Islands. My thanks to Redcliffe College for providing a copy of this book for digitisation. This title is in the public domain.

Eliza Suzanna Armstrong [1836-1908], The History of the Melanesian Mission. London: Isbister & Co. Ltd., 1900. Hbk. pp.372. [Download complete book in PDF]

Contents

Part 1

  1. 1841-48. The Melanesian Mission
  2. 1849-52. The Australian Board of Missions
  3. 1853-56. John Coleridge Patteson
  4. 1857-58. Winter School at Lifu
  5. 1858-61. Consecration of John Coleridge Patteson

Part 2

  1. 1861-62. Establishment at Mota
  2. 1863. Peril and Success
  3. 1863-64. In the Australian Colonies
  4. 1864. Deaths of Edwin Nobbs and Fisher Young
  5. 1865-66. The Tree Forts

Part 3

  1. 1867. S. Barnabas, Norfolk Island
  2. 1868-69. The Labour Trade in Melanesia
  3. 1870. Internal Management of Mission
  4. 1871.
  5. The Bishop’s Last Journey

Part 4

  1. 1871-72. Mr. Codrington as Head of the Mission
  2. 1873. The First Melanesian Priest
  3. 1874. The New Southern Cross
  4. 1875. Mr. Codrington in the Islands
  5. 1876. Mr. Selwyn’s Tour
  6. 1871. The Consecration of John Richardson Selwyn

Part 5

  1. 1877. The Way Open to Santa Cruz
  2. 1878. In the Santa Cruz Islands
  3. 1879. Teachers’ Meeting at Mota – Census
  4. 1880. Consecration of S. Barnabas
  5. 1881. Justice Done in the Floridas
  6. 1882. Ordination of Charles Sapibuana
  7. 1883. Great Advance in Florida
  8. 1884. Memorial Cross at Nukapu
  9. 1885. Clement Marau at Ulawa
  10. 1886. Mrs. J. Selwyn’s Visit to the Islands
  11. 1887. Retirement of Dr. Codrington
  12. 1888. The Parliament of the Floridas
  13. 1889. The Baptism of Soga
  14. 1890. Serious Illness of the Bishop
  15. 1891. The Bishop Leaves for England – His Resignation
  16. 1892. Visit of the Bishop of Tasmania
  17. 1893. British Protectorate in the Solomons

Part 6

  1. 1894. The Consecration of the Cecil Wilson
  2. 1895. S. Luke’s, Siota
  3. 1896. Women’s Work in the Mission
  4. 1897. Difficulties in Queensland
  5. 1898. Death of Bishop John Selwyn
  6. 1899. The Jubilee of the Mission

 

Story of the London Missionary Society in the South Seas

George Cousins [1842-?], The Story of the South SeasThe work of the London Missionary Society in the Pacific Ocean through its “Missionary Ships” is truly inspiring. In this heavily illustrated book George Cousins (editorial Assistant and Assistant Foreign Secretary of the London Missionary Society) draws on a number of sources to retell the story. My thanks to Redcliffe College for providing a copy of the book for scanning. This title is in the public domain.

George Cousins [1842-?], The Story of the South Seas. London: London Missionary Society, 1894. Hbk. pp.246. [Click to download complete book in PDF]

Contents

  1. The Good Ship “Duff” and Her Strange Cargo
  2. “The Night of Toil”
  3. The Overthrow of Idolatry
  4. Spreading Out
  5. Carrying the Light to Other Groups
  6. The “Messenger of Peace” and Her Useful Work
  7. The Martyred Missionary Polynesia
  8. Further Extension
  9. Teaching and Training Heathen Converts
  10. Joining Hands to Save New Guinea
  11. Summing Up, or Work and Workers in the Older Stations
  12. Other Labourers in the Southern Ocean

Preface

This book is the outcome of the revived interest in the South Seas which the effort to build the steamer John William’s has created. In reading old books descriptive of the early days of the mission I came across so many striking facts unknown to the present generation that a desire to put these facts together in a short connected story grew strong within me.

The first few pages repeat what appears in the opening chapter of “From Island to Island,” but in an altered form. The remainder is newly written. The books to which I am specially indebted are: Ellis’s “Polynesian Researches,” Williams’s “Missionary Enterprises,” Buzacott’s “Mission Life in the Pacific,” Turner’s” Nineteen Years in Polynesia,” Murray’s” Western Polynesia,” and” Forty Years’ Mission Work,” Gill’s “Gems from the Coral Islands,” Dr. Steele’s “New Hebrides and Christian Missions,” “The Night of Toil,” by the author of the “Peep of Day,” and an article entitled “Christian Work in Polynesia,” which appeared in” The Missionary Review of the World. [Continue reading]

Warneck’s Outline of a History of Protestant Missions

Gustav Warneck [1834-1910], Outline of a History of Protestant Missions From the Reformation to the Present TimeGustav Warneck [1834-1910] provides an overview of Protestant missions from the Reformation to the end of the 19th Century. Part 1 covers the period chronologically and Part 2 geographically. The original had some pen underlining which it was not possible to remove. My thanks to Redcliffe College for providing a copy of the book to scan. This title is in the public domain.

Gustav Warneck [1834-1910], Outline of a History of Protestant Missions From the Reformation to the Present Time. With an Appendix concerning Roman Catholic Missions, 3rd edn. London & Edinburgh: Oliphant Anderson & Ferrier, 1906. Hbk. pp.435. [Download complete book in PDF]

Contents

  • Part I. Missionary Life at Home

  1. Introduction
  2. The Age of the Reformation
  3. The Age of Orthodoxy
  4. The Age of Pietism
  5. The Present Age of Missions
  6. History of the Foundation and Growth of Missionary Societies
  • Appendix to Part I: Roman Catholic Missions
  • Part II. The Field of Evangelical Missions

    Introduction

  1. America
  2. Africa
  3. The Old Oriental Churches
  4. Asia
  5. Oceania

Introduction

Christian missions are as old .as Christianity itself. The missionary idea, indeed, is much older. In affirming an eternal origin for the Divine decree of salvation, Paul affirms it equally for the universality of salvation (Eph, iii 1-12). God, who called the universe into being) designed His whole creation from all eternity for a universal salvation. Therefore did He not only create a human race after His own likeness,, which is of one blood dwelling over the whole earth, but this human race, formed after His likeness, and one, He made to be in its totality the object of His saving love which is determined· in Christ. [Continue reading]

Progress of Missions in the Hundred Years After Carey

Delavan L. Leonard [1834-1917], A Hundred Years of Missions or The Story of Progress Since Carey's BeginningAlthough Delavan Leonard’s history of missions covers early church and medieval missions, his primary focus is in “The Great Century” following William Carey. He provides an overview of progress of the Great Commission by Continent as well as a chapter of work still to be done. My thanks to Redcliffe College for providing me with a copy of this book to scan. This title is in the public domain.

Delavan L. Leonard [1834-1917], A Hundred Years of Missions or The Story of Progress Since Carey’s Beginning. New York: Funk & Wagnalls Co., 1895. Hbk. pp.430.  [Click to download complete book in PDF]

Contents

  • Preface
  • Introduction
  1. The Christian Idea of Missions
  2. Missions in the Early Centuries
  3. Conversion of Northern and Western Europe
  4. The Non-Missionary Centuries
  5. Reformation ad Discovery of America
  6. Roman Catholic Missions
  7. Preparation For Foreign Missions
  8. Protestant Missions Before Carey
  9. The Carey Epoch
  10. The Great Missionary Revival
  11. Genesis of Missions in America
  12. The Phenomenon of Missionary Expansion
  13. Missions in India
  14. Missions in Africa; Madagascar
  15. The Islands of the Sea
  16. Turkish Empire: Persia
  17. Chinese Empire’ Korea
  18. Missions in Japan
  19. Missions in Spanish America
  20. Missions Among the American Indians
  21. The Land Which Remains to be Possessed

Introduction

It is sometimes a question how far an introduction helps the book it introduces. If the author is well known he needs no such formal entrance into the literary world; if he is as yet unfamiliar to a wide circle of readers, his book itself is his best recommendation.

Dickens used to say that it was an easy thing to ” come out into society, but a difficult thing to prevent going in again.” And so a book or an author that proves unworthy of the introduction to the public, cannot long float, notwithstanding the outside supports intended to give it buoyancy. [Continue reading]

Voyage on the Missionary Ship “John Williams”

R. Wardlaw Thompson [1842-1916], My Trip on the "John Williams"There were seven missionary ships operated in the Pacific Ocean by the London Missionary Society called John Williams, named after the British missionary (1796 – 20 November 1839). The first John Williams sank in 1864, so the voyage described in this book is, presumably, on one of the later ships. My thanks to Redcliffe College for providing a copy of this book to scan. This title is in the Public Domain.

Wikipedia has a short article on the ships that needs expanding – if you wish to add this book to its bibliography, please link to this page rather than directly to the PDF below.

R. Wardlaw Thompson [1842-1916], My Trip on the “John Williams”. London: Missionary Society, 1900. Hbk. pp.208. [Click to download complete book in PDF]

Contents

  1. Our Start – Brisbane to Kwato
  2. At Kwato
  3. Milne Bay to Isulailai
  4. In the Kerepunu District
  5. At Kalo and Hula
  6. Vatorata
  7. Delena and Jokea
  8. The Fly River and the Islands
  9. Port Moresby, and Farewell
  10. In the Loyalty Islands and Erromanga
  11. Fiji and Niué
  12. In the Cook Islands
  13. In the Cook Islands (Continued)
  14. In the Samoan Group

Preface

It has been a great pleasure to write for those who collected the money for building the John Williams, and who meet the cost of working it, the following brief record of a delightful tour. Our Mission steamer cost a great deal to build, and she costs twice as much as the old barque to maintain. But my voyage made three things very clear:- (1) Such a vessel is necessary if the work of the Mission is to be properly done; (2) the work is worth all the expenditure; (3) the vessel is admirably suited for the purpose for which she has been built. [Continue reading]