Cobra’s Den and Other Stories of Missionary Work among the Telugas of India

Jacob Chamberlain [1835-1908], The Cobra's Den, and other stories of missionary work among the Telugus of India.

Jacob Chamberlain was a Medical Missionary from Connecticut who served in India amongst the Teluga people.

Chamberlain effectively used his medical and surgical work to open the way for Christian teaching. Considered one of the most enterprising of modern missionaries, he is credited in large measure for the marked success and rapid growth of the Christian church in India. His amazing experiences became the primary material for tracts and books.


Florence R. Scott, Evangelical Dictionary of Christian Missions, p. 172

My thanks to Redcliffe College for providing a copy of this public domain title for digitisation.

Jacob Chamberlain [1835-1908], The Cobra’s Den, and other stories of missionary work among the Telugus of India. New York / Chicago: Fleming H. Revell Co., 1900. Hbk. pp.270. [Click to visit the Jacob Chamberlain page for the download link to this book and other material]

Contents

  • Introductory
  1. The Cobra’s Den
  2. The Snake-Bitten Hindu’s Story
  3. The Angry Mob and the Story of the Cross
  4. The Surgeon’s Knife Dethrones a Hindu Idol
  5. Yes, or No? Instructions Wanted
  6. Those Torn-Up Gospels
  7. The Hindu Judge’s Opinion of the Bible
  8. Marketing the Bible
  9. A Medico-Evangelistic Tour
  10. Hinduism as It Is
  11. “Lord Ganésa” and Little Rámaswámi
  12. A Brahman’s Testimony
  13. A Daybreak Audience and a Chase for a Tiger
  14. The Spotted Tiger Foiled
  15. The Heat of India: How I Keep My Study Cool
  16. Oddities of Travel in India
  17. A Missionary Sanitarium
  18. How the “Cut” Cuts
  19. How Hindu Christians Give
  20. A Merchant of Means Join Us
  21. “Break Cocoanuts Over the Wheels”
  22. The Weaving of India Rugs or God’s Plans in Our Lives
  23. “Despondent Missionaries”
  24. The Change of Front in India
  25. Vernacular Preaching: Is it Ineffective?”
  26. A Unique Missionary Meeting on the Himálayas
  27. The Oriental “Bride of the Lamb”

Preface

The exceedingly kind reception given on both sides of the Atlantic, to “In the Tiger Jungle and Other Stories of Missionary Work among the Telugus” seems to indicate that such simple sketches of incidents in the life and work of any earnest, observant missionary have a place of some importance, in quickening the interest of both young people and older in all that pertains to the spread of the Kingdom, and that another collection of such sketches may not be out of place. Indeed, many urgent requests, from both friends and strangers, in Europe, Asia, and America, have been received, that at the earliest date another such collection should be issued. As these requests have come largely from acknowledged leaders in the church in the Home Lands, as well as from fellow-missionaries in different countries, and from Missionary Secretaries of many Societies and Boards, the call can no longer be left unheeded…Page 7

Strong Tower – an Account of the Nosu Church of Tibet by Marshall Broomhall

Marshall Broomhall [1866-1937], Strong Tower.

Marshall Broomhall wrote this book in order to make known the challenges that the Nosu Christians of Tibet were facing in the 1940s. My thanks to Book Aid for providing a copy of this public domain title for digitisation.

Marshall Broomhall [1866-1937], Strong Tower. London: China Inland Mission, 1947. Hbk. pp.256. [Click here to visit the download page for this title]

Contents

  • List of Illustrations
  • Introduction
  1. Vignette of a Nosu
  2. Early Days
  3. Country and People
  4. Background to Adventure
  5. Hand to the Plough
  6. New Horizons
  7. Plots and Perplexities
  8. The Heat of Day
  9. The Manager
  10. Scattered Outposts: I
  11. Scattered Outposts: II
  12. Bittersweet
  13. Weathering Storms
  14. Brief Interlude
  15. Terror by Night
  16. Hors De Combat
  17. Back to the Fray
  18. Hard Pressed
  19. Alarms and Excursions
  20. Cast Upon God
  • Epilogue
  • Historical Note
  • Glossary

Frederick Baedeker, Horace Underwood and Arthur Neve – Heroes of the Cross

Frontispiece: Dr. Baedeker preaching and distributing books to convicts in Siberia
Frontispiece: Dr. Baedeker preaching and distributing books to convicts in Siberia

Christine Isabel Tinling [1869-1943], one of the founders of the Algiers Evangelistic Band, wrote short biographies of three other missionary heroes who inspired her: Frederick Baedeker, Horace Underwood and Arthur Neve of Kashmir. My thanks to Book Aid for making a copy of this public domain title available for digitisation.

Christine Isabel Tinling [1869-1943], Heroes of the Cross. Dr Frederick Baedeker :: Horace Underwood :: Arthur Neve of Kashmir. London: Marshall, Morgan & Scott. Ltd., [1933]. Hbk. pp.96. [Click here to visit the download page for this title]

Contents

  • Frederick Baedeker the Prisoners’ Friend
  • Horace Underwood of Korea
  • Arthur Neve of Kashmir

Frederick Baedeker the Prisoners’ Friend

Baedeker! Have you ever heard that name before? Perhaps not. Ask those who have travelled abroad and they will say at once, ” Oh, yes, the guide book man!” Try it and see if they don’t. His name is so well known that it has almost become a common noun. People speak of taking their Baedeker with them, as they would speak of taking their umbrella or their purse.

Karl Baedeker was a German book-seller and publisher, and he brought out guide-books of different countries till he had described most of the civilised lands of the world. They were packed full of useful information and told you where to go and what to see and what to pay. They were printed in German and French and English and Baedeker thus became famous. His success was due to hard work: he was very careful and exact in all he wrote, and then too, he employed good scholars to help him.

But our story is about another Baedeker, not that one. The guide-book man had a cousin who sometimes W’I’ote for him, and he also became famous, in a different way. Karl was a guide to all parts of the earth and a very good one to: Frederick was to thousands of people a guide to heaven. He showed them the way to God; he taught them to put their trust in Jesus, who is the Way, the Truth and the Life.

Frederick became known as Doctor Baedeker, becauae of the letters Ph.D. after his name, which mean “doctor of philosophy ” not medicine. But the Russian peasants to whom he afterwards went called him “Dedouchka”  or “Dear Grandfather!’ In this story I shall use all these names and you can pick out the one you like the best.

But first we must call him Frederick and begin with his boyhood for, of course, it was only long afterwards that he earned his other names.

The little town of Witten, where he was born, is near the river Rhine, which is very beautiful thereabouts. In the Baedeker home there were four boys and two girls, and Frederick was the youngest son but one. They called him Fritz for short. Their father was a naturalist; he studied animals and particularly birds. This was very jolly for the children, for he could tell them no end of interesting things and they could help him hunt for specimens.

Mr. Baedeker had a big collection of birds and their eggs, some of them very rare. There were eggs of different shades and colours, brown and blue and green, pearly white ones and pretty speckled ones. They were all sizes too, from the big eggs of the eagle and the stork down to the tiny ones of the little hedge wren. He knew them all, and the children learned to know them too. Mr. Baedeker was so famous that when people in far away parts of Europe found some egg that they could not name, they would pack it up and send it to him and he would tell them what it was. He wrote a book about birds’ eggs and painted the pictures himself. After he died his collection was taken to Berlin and placed in a natural history museum.

Fritz’s mother was rather strict, but I expect those four boys needed to be kept in order and perhaps even the girls too. Six children are quite a houseful, and I dare say they made plenty of noise. Fritz was specially fond of his elder sister Pauline, and when he was in trouble it was to her he went….

Pages 5-6

History of Anglican Missions in North India

Cover: C.F. Andrews [1871-1940], North India. Handbooks of English Church Expansion

This is a brief history of the work of Anglican missions in North India up to around 1908. My thanks to Redcliffe College for making a copy of this public domain title available for digitisation.

C.F. Andrews [1871-1940], North India. Handbooks of English Church Expansion. London & Oxford: A.R. Mowbray & Co. Ltd., 1908. Hbk. pp.243. [Click to visit the download page for this title]

Contents

  • General Preface
  • Editor’s Preface
  • Author’s Preface
  1. Early Days in Bengal
  2. Calcutta and Its Bishops
  3. Chhota Nagpur and Mass Movements
  4. Father Goreh
  5. The Oxford Mission
  6. Allahabad, Cawmpore, and Dehli
  7. The Panjab and Islam
  8. Amritsar and the Sikhs
  9. The Frontier Missions
  10. The Indian Point of View
  11. The National Movement
  • Appendix A. Modern Krishna Worship
  • Appendix B. Literature Dealing with Mission Work in North India

Editor’s Preface

Few facts in modern history are more arresting or instructive than the rapid extension of the Church’s responsibilities and labours in the colonial and missionary fields; yet, until recently, few facts perhaps have been less familiar to those who have not deliberately given themselves to a study of the subject.

It has therefore been felt that the time has come when a series of monographs, dealing with the expansion of the Church of England beyond the seas, may be of service towards fixing the popular attention upon that great cause, the growing interest in which constitutes so thankworthy a feature in the Church’s outlook to-day.

The range of this series is confined to the work in which the Church of England is engaged. That story is too full to allow of any attempt to include the splendid devotion, and the successful labours, of other Missions of Christendom. But, for a fair work, a knowledge of those Missions is essential; and it is in the hope of leading some of its readers to such further comparative study that this series has been taken in hand.

The Editors have tried to keep in view the fact that, while the wonderful achievements here recorded have been accomplished in large part through the agency of our Missionary Societies, yet these Societies are, after all, only the hands and arms of the Holy Church in the execution of her divine mission to the world…

Pages vii-viii.

1890 Deputation Visit to North China by Rev T.M. Morris

Cover: T.M. Morris [1830-1904], A Winter in North China with an Introduction by the Rev. Richard Glover of Bristol.

This is an account of a deputation tour of Baptist Missionary Society stations in Northern China by the Rev. T.M. Morris and Rev. Richard Glover.

My thanks to Redcliffe College for providing a copy of this public domain title for digitisation.

T.M. Morris [1830-1904], A Winter in North China with an Introduction by the Rev. Richard Glover of Bristol. London: The Religious Tract Society, 1892. Hbk. pp.256. [Click to visit the download page for this title]

Contents

  • Introduction
  • Author’s Preface
  1. From San Francisco to Yokohama
  2. Chefoo and Tien-Tsin
  3. From Tien-Tsin to Tsing-Chow-Fu
  4. Tsing-Chow-Fu
  5. Chow-Ping
  6. Chi-Nan-Fu
  7. The Great Plain of China
  8. T’ai-Yuen-Fu
  9. Peking
  10. An Interview with Li-Hung-Chang
  11. Shanghai
  12. Hankow, Hong-Kong, and Canton
  13. The Religions of China
  14. Fung-Shui
  15. Missionary Works and Methods in China

Author’s Preface

The question of sending out a deputation to China had long been considered by the committee of the Baptist Missionary Society, and our missionaries in China had been long asking that a deputation should be sent. ‘Our work,’ they said, ‘has been criticized by those who have never seen it, and who have known little or nothing of the circumstances in which and the conditions under which that work is being carried on. Our work has never been described but by ourselves, and there are many who think, and some who say, that we are not the fittest people to estimate the value of our own work. Send out, then, two men in whom you have confidence, and in whom we shall have confidence. Let them visit our stations and see our work with their own eyes, and on their return give a faithful, unbiassed report of what they have seen and heard. With that report, whatever may be its character, we shall be satisfied, and we trust you will be satisfied.’

The request was felt to be reasonable, but it was one which could not be easily complied with. In 1890, however, the committee felt that a deputation ought to be sent: out without further delay, and Dr. Glover and myself were asked to undertake the work. For myself, I may say that I never entered upon any work with more hesitation and reluctance; but there is now scarcely any part of my life upon which I look back with feelings of greater satisfaction. I am thankful, and ever shall be thankful, that I have been permitted to see something of that great work which God is carrying on in China.

Our instructions were to visit our own missionary stations in the two provinces of Shantung and Shansi, and report upon the work done. Further, we were to see all that could be seen of the work of other societies in those parts of China which we might visit. During our brief stay in that great empire we had the opportunity of inspecting the work of many missionary societies, and we were constantly moved to thank God for what we saw. We had read about missions in China, we had heard about them, and we were not disappointed when we were brought face to face with them; for extent, character, and worth they far exceeded our largest expectations; and so far from feeling that we had been deluded by exaggerated, extravagant, or garbled statements, we felt, as we passed from one mission station to another, that ‘ the half had not been told.’ Again and again have we said to missionary brethren as they have quietly unfolded to us the extent and results of the work in which they were engaged, ‘Why have you not told us this at home? It has all the charm of a romance.’

Pages 11-12

Thinking Black by Dan Crawford

Daniel Crawford [1870-1926], Thinking Black: 22 Years without a Break in the Long Grass of Central Africa, 2nd edn.
The Look-Out Hut. Onn the Cliff overhanging Lake Mweru

Dan Crawford’s account of his 22 Years work in the Congo. This volume has a number of superb colour plates. My thanks to Redcliffe College for providing a copy of this public domain book for digitisation.

Daniel Crawford [1870-1926], Thinking Black: 22 Years without a Break in the Long Grass of Central Africa, 2nd edn. London: Morgan and Scott Ltd., 1913. Hbk. pp.502. [Click to visit the Dan Crawford page for the download link to this title and others]

Contents

  • Publisher’s Note
  • Acknowledgments
  1. First Fears Justified
  2. First Things First
  3. Far, yet not Farthest, In
  4. Our African Apprenticeship
  5. “Boring in” Farther
  6. Eastward Ho!
  7. “Own Up and Pay Up”
  8. Dark Doings in Luvaleland
  9. The Desert Journey
  10. Farthest, but Shut, In
  11. Vice Versa
  12. Shut in, but Almost Out
  13. Black Suffragettes
  14. Thus Far and No Farther
  15. Red Sunsets
  16. “Nemesis, Daughter of Night”
  17. Our Eastern Exodus
  18. Boring out East
  19. Kavanaga: The Gates of the Morning
  20. “Great White Lake”
  21. A Page of History
  22. Black Man=Black Manners
  23. “THe Year of Love”: An Epilogue
  • L’Envoi
  • index


For Christ and Cuzco, Peru – A Memorial of William H. Newell

A fruit seller of Peru

This is an account of the life and work of William H. Newell in Cuzco, Peru, with the Regions Beyond Missionary Union. My thanks to Redcliffe College for providing a copy of this public domain title for digitisation.

Martha Newell [1844-1934], For Christ and Cuzco. A Memorial of W.H. Newell, Missionary to Cuzco, Peru. London: Regions Beyond Missionary Union, n.d. Hbk. pp.164. [Click to visit the download page for this title]

Contents

  • Preface by H. Grattan Guinness, M.D.
  1. A Mother’s Recollections
  2. At Harley College, Bow
  3. At Cliff College, Derbyshire
  4. Called to Peru
  5. In Cuzco
  6. The Fight Continued
  7. Steps in Advance
  8. Last Days
  9. Afterwards

Preface

Amongst the hundreds of students with whom it has been my privilege to come into contact during the past nineteen years, some have been conspicuous for preaching gift and others for intellectual power; a number made their mark in the field of inter-college athletics; others, again, were influential as men of holiness and prayer; and many, though excellent men, were not’ in any way remarkable.

It would have been impossible, however, to lose sight of Will. Newell in the crowd. His bright face was sure to catch my eye at morning prayers, whilst his sweet tenor voice impressed one, even if fifty other men were joining in the hymn. His prayers were full of devotion, the evident expression of a Spirit-filled life.

Nor, on the other hand, could one overlook Newell on the cricket field, where, in imagination I see him now, fielding at point, or doing good service with the ball….

Page 9

Herbert Stanley Jenkins , Medical Missionary to Shensi, China

Portrait: Herbert Stanley Jenkins [1874-1913]
Frontispiece

Herbert Stanley Jenkins [1874-1913] served with the Baptist Missionary Society in China. This biography also includes some material on the wider work of the BMS there.

My thanks to Redcliffe College for providing a copy of this public domain title for digitisation.

Richard Glover [1837-1919], Herbert Stanley Jenkins, M.D., F.R.C.S., Medical Missionary, Shensi, China with Some Notices of the Work of the Baptist Missionary Society in that Country. London: The Carey Press, 1914. Hbk. pp.155.

Contents

  • Author’s Note
  1. Earlier years
  2. The Work of the Baptist Missionary Society in China
  3. Shensi Work
  4. Entrance on Missionary Work
  5. The Medical Missionary
  6. The Revolution
  7. The Last Stage
  8. Some General Reflections
  9. Letters From Friends

Chapter 1: Earlier Years

The proper study of mankind is man – a study full of instruction for those who pursue it with real earnestness. The strange way in which purposes are formed, expanded, and achieved by inspirations of grace, and the honour which God puts on all faithfulness, demand attention. There is especial interest in noting how Providence, operating simultaneously on individual lives and also on nations, secures augmented results from each.

The outward features of Stanley Jenkins’ earlier life are soon told. He was born in Bristol in 1874; one of the younger members of a large family, most of them marked by physical energy, and constituting a typically happy and united home; a home where the Herbert Stanley Jenkins parents blended happily authority, love, and piety, and where the number of the children supplied the genial corrective of all selfish tendencies; a home, therefore, where all natural excellences might be expected to thrive, where good health and good temper prevented any early and weakening development of self-consciousness, where it was natural that all kindly qualities should develop.

In the history of his school-days nothing very remarkable is to be noticed, save that while still a youth (in his fourteenth year) the great awakening of the soul came to him.

Parental piety was the atmosphere in which his higher thoughts and purposes were matured. He was greatly helped by some of those activities which devote themselves to the spiritual quickening of the schoolboy. Some may criticize defects in these activities, saying they develop unduly self-consciousness, are too doctrinal in their presentation of the Gospel, and give a trend to the devout life tending to make it narrow, and lead to the idea that character is complete when conversion to God has taken place. Possibly there are grounds in some instances for such views. In the case of Stanley Jenkins no such influence can be traced. The great fact of his life was that Jesus Christ then aawned on his soul. In the language of St. Paul, “The light of the knowledge of the glory of God shone through the fac~ of Jesus Christ into his heart,” flooding it with a sunshine that never failed, but grew until it became the light of heaven….

Pages 11-13

6 Missionary Heroes of Africa

Cover: John C. Lambert [1857-1917], Missionary Heroes in Africa. True Stories of the Intrepid Bravery and Stirring Adventures of Missionaries with Uncivilised Man, Wild Beasts and the Forces of Nature

There are numerous volumes in the “Missionary Heroes” series, consisting of short biographies written to inspire and challenge young people by their examples. The “heroes” covered in this volume are:

My thanks to Redcliffe College for providing a copy of this public domain book for digitisation.

John C. Lambert [1857-1917], Missionary Heroes in Africa. True Stories of the Intrepid Bravery and Stirring Adventures of Missionaries with Uncivilised Man, Wild Beasts and the Forces of Nature. London: Seeley, Service & Co. Ltd., [1909]. Hbk. pp.156. [Click to visit he download page for this title]

Contents

  • Prefactory Note
  • Introduction
  1. “The Hero of Uganda”
  2. The Lion-Hearted Bishop
  3. Pioneers in Nyasaland
  4. Wortrekkers in Barotseland
  5. A Pioneer in Garenganze
  6. A Tramp Through the Great Pygmy Forest

Introduction

In a “foreword” which he contributes to Dr. Jacob Chamberlain’s attractive missionary book, In the Tiger Jitng-le, Dr. Francis E. Clark expresses the opinion that one need not patronize sensational and unhealthy fiction to find stirring adventure and thrilling narrative, and then goes on to say:-

“There is one source which furnishes stories of intense and dramatic interest, abounding in novel situations and spiced with abundant adventure ; and this source is at the same time the purest and most invigorating fountain at which our youth can drink. To change the figure, this is a mine hitherto largely unworked; it contains rich nuggets of ore, which will well repay the prospector in this new field.”

The field to which Dr. Clark refers is the history of modern Christian missions. His meaning is that the adventurous and stirring side of missionary experience needs to be brought out, and emphasis laid upon the fact that the romantic days of missions are by no means past.
There are stories which are now among the classics of missionary romance. Such are the expedition of Hans Egede to Greenland, the lonely journeys of David Brainerd among the Indian tribes of the North American forests, the voyage of John Williams from one coral island of the Pacific to another in the little ship which his own hands had built, the exploration of the Dark Continent by David Livingstone in the hope of emancipating the black man’s soul.

But among missionary lives which are more recent or less known, there are many not less noble or less thrilling than those just referred to; and the chapters which follow are an attempt to make this plain.

There is, of course, a deeper side to Christian missions-a side that is essential and invariable – while the elements of adventure and romance are accidental and occasional. If in these pages the spiritual aspects of foreign mission work are but slightly touched upon, it is not because they are either forgotten or ignored, but simply because it was not part of the writer’s present plan to deal with them. It is hoped, nevertheless, that some of those into whose hands this book may come will be induced by what they read to make fuller acquaintance with the lives and aims of our missionary heroes, and so will catch something of that spirit which led them to face innumerable dangers, toils, and trials among heathen and often savage peoples, whether in the frozen North or the burning South, whether in the hidden depths of some vast continent or among the scattered “islands of the ocean seas.”

Pages 9-11

‘For His Sake’: Elsie Marshall’s Life of Consecration and Devotion to China

Elsie Marshall [1869-1895]

Elsie Marshall served in China with the Church of England Zenana Mission Society until her untimely death in 1885. This is her story, told through extracts of her letters. My thanks to Redcliffe College for providing a copy of this public domain title for digitisation.

Elsie Marshall [1869-1895], ‘For His Sake’. A Record of a Life consecrated to God and devoted to China. Extracts From the Letters of Elsie Marshall, Martyred at Hwa-Sang, August 1, 1895, 6th edn. London: The Religious Tract Society, n.d. Hbk. pp.208. [Click to visit the download page for digitisation]

Contents

  • Introductory Memoir
  1. The Voyage Out
  2. Arrival in China
  3. At Fuh-ning
  4. At Kulianf, on the Hills near Foochow
  5. At Fuh-ning
  6. At Ku-cheng
  7. At Work in the District
  8. Kuliang For Hot Months and Journeys
  9. Sek-Check-Du
  10. Work Disttributed by the Vegetarian Riots, Which Ended in the Massacre at Hws-Sang, Ku-Cheng, August 1, 1895
  11. Extracts from Letters

Introductory Memoir

A short sketch of the life of the writer of the following record of missionary work in China will perhaps enhance its interest for the general reader, and make clear some of the personal allusions, which could not be well omitted without breaking the continuity of the letters. The letters themselves are published in the hope, and with the earnest prayer, in which it is certain the writer would (and perchance does) join, that their perusal may stir up still greater zeal in hastening forward the King’s business in the land of Sinim, which recent events-and not least amongst them the martyrdoms at Ku-cheng-will assuredly open up to the ‘ Divine Enterprise of Missions’; and lead many to adopt what she found to be the happiest of all lives: to give up home ‘for His sake,”in order to go and tell the love of Jesus to those who have never heard.

Page 3