Patteson of the Isles by Mary H. Debenham

John Coleridge Patteson

Mary H. Debenham’s short biography of the great South Sea missionary John Coleridge Patteson [1827-1871] entered the public domain this year. My thanks to Redcliffe College for providing a copy of the book for digitisation.

Mary H. Debenham [1864-1947], Patteson of the Isles. London: Oxford University Press, 1921. Hbk. pp.160. [Click to visit the download page]

Contents

  • Foreword
  1. Two Devon Boys
  2. Out to His Great Adventure
  3. Finding His Sea-Legs
  4. ‘The Multitude of the Isles’
  5. The Boys of the Islands
  6. ‘Business in Great Waters’
  7. Father of the Island Sons
  8. The Cruise of the ‘Sea Breeze’
  9. The Road of the Holy Cross
  10. The Weaving of the Net
  11. The Secret of St. Barnabas
  12. The Snatch-Snatch Boats
  13. ‘Port, After Stormy Seas’

Chapter 1: Two Devon Boys

Twelve hundred and odd years ago there was a small boy running about among  the green hills and woods of South Devon, the county that bred Drake and Hawkins and Grenville and many another gentleman adventurer who sailed westward to singe His Spanish Majesty’s beard.

This boy lived long before the days when England was one kingdom; he went about bare-legged and bare-armed, with a tunic to his knee, and talked English in a fashion that few of us would understand. But, underneath the little differences of clothes and language, he was a good deal like other boys of all ages. He probably carried a sling, and knew how to bring down a partridge or a heron. He knew when the golden-brown streams were ready for fishing. He liked to be in for as much of the excitement as possible when the older men hunted a wolf, and he liked the fun of the midsummer fair…

To find more material on John Coleridge Patteson, visit this page.

London Missionary Society – Gleanings From Many Lands

George Cousins [1842-?], Gleanings From Many Fields, 3rd edn.This book represents a summary of the achievements of the London Missionary Society over 100 years since its foundation. It is drawn from accounts of its workers across the all the countries that the L.M.S. had worked in. There are fifty illustrations in this volume. My thanks to Redcliffe College for providing me with a copy of the book to scan. This title is in the public domain.

George Cousins [1842-?], Gleanings From Many Fields, 3rd edn. London: London Missionary Society, 1896. Hbk. pp.216. [Click to download complete book in PDF]

Contents

  • Preface
  1. Natives and Native Ways
  2. Cruel Customs That Christ is Conquering
  3. Child Life and Amusements
  4. Stories of Wild Beasts
  5. Perils by Land and Water
  6. In the Land of Idols
  7. Progress in “The Middle Kingdom”
  8. Light in the Great Dark Continent
  9. Madagascar and the Malagasy
  10. Isles of the Southern Ocean
  11. Rescuing the Negroes of the West Indies
  12. Faithful Unto Death
  13. Native Workers For Christ
  14. Schools and Scholars
  15. Among the Sick and Suffering
  16. Women to the Rescue

Chapter 1: Natives and Native Ways

The South Sea Islanders, like many of their more civilized fellow-creatures, are very fond of feasting. They believe m p1es and puddings quite as much as. you do, and not only at Christmas time, but at all seasons of the year. Theirs, however, are much larger than yours. Fancy a pie ten or twelve feet round! And a roly-poly three hundred feet long, and about as thick as a man’s body! You could not eat many of those Christmas pies, or many slices of those puddings, I am sure! It would not be a very easy matter to make and cook such large pies and puddings in England, but the natives find no difficulty in making or eating them. To make the puddings, they simply dig a trench, fill it with wood, upon which they place stones. [Continue reading]

History of the Melanesian Mission

Eliza Suzanna Armstrong [1836-1908], The History of the Melanesian MissionEliza Susanna Armstrong provides a detailed history of the Melanesian Mission from 1841 to 1899. This region includes what is today Papua New Guinea, Fiji, Vanuatu and the Solomon Islands. My thanks to Redcliffe College for providing a copy of this book for digitisation. This title is in the public domain.

Eliza Suzanna Armstrong [1836-1908], The History of the Melanesian Mission. London: Isbister & Co. Ltd., 1900. Hbk. pp.372. [Download complete book in PDF]

Contents

Part 1

  1. 1841-48. The Melanesian Mission
  2. 1849-52. The Australian Board of Missions
  3. 1853-56. John Coleridge Patteson
  4. 1857-58. Winter School at Lifu
  5. 1858-61. Consecration of John Coleridge Patteson

Part 2

  1. 1861-62. Establishment at Mota
  2. 1863. Peril and Success
  3. 1863-64. In the Australian Colonies
  4. 1864. Deaths of Edwin Nobbs and Fisher Young
  5. 1865-66. The Tree Forts

Part 3

  1. 1867. S. Barnabas, Norfolk Island
  2. 1868-69. The Labour Trade in Melanesia
  3. 1870. Internal Management of Mission
  4. 1871.
  5. The Bishop’s Last Journey

Part 4

  1. 1871-72. Mr. Codrington as Head of the Mission
  2. 1873. The First Melanesian Priest
  3. 1874. The New Southern Cross
  4. 1875. Mr. Codrington in the Islands
  5. 1876. Mr. Selwyn’s Tour
  6. 1871. The Consecration of John Richardson Selwyn

Part 5

  1. 1877. The Way Open to Santa Cruz
  2. 1878. In the Santa Cruz Islands
  3. 1879. Teachers’ Meeting at Mota – Census
  4. 1880. Consecration of S. Barnabas
  5. 1881. Justice Done in the Floridas
  6. 1882. Ordination of Charles Sapibuana
  7. 1883. Great Advance in Florida
  8. 1884. Memorial Cross at Nukapu
  9. 1885. Clement Marau at Ulawa
  10. 1886. Mrs. J. Selwyn’s Visit to the Islands
  11. 1887. Retirement of Dr. Codrington
  12. 1888. The Parliament of the Floridas
  13. 1889. The Baptism of Soga
  14. 1890. Serious Illness of the Bishop
  15. 1891. The Bishop Leaves for England – His Resignation
  16. 1892. Visit of the Bishop of Tasmania
  17. 1893. British Protectorate in the Solomons

Part 6

  1. 1894. The Consecration of the Cecil Wilson
  2. 1895. S. Luke’s, Siota
  3. 1896. Women’s Work in the Mission
  4. 1897. Difficulties in Queensland
  5. 1898. Death of Bishop John Selwyn
  6. 1899. The Jubilee of the Mission

 

Story of the London Missionary Society in the South Seas

George Cousins [1842-?], The Story of the South SeasThe work of the London Missionary Society in the Pacific Ocean through its “Missionary Ships” is truly inspiring. In this heavily illustrated book George Cousins (editorial Assistant and Assistant Foreign Secretary of the London Missionary Society) draws on a number of sources to retell the story. My thanks to Redcliffe College for providing a copy of the book for scanning. This title is in the public domain.

George Cousins [1842-?], The Story of the South Seas. London: London Missionary Society, 1894. Hbk. pp.246. [Click to download complete book in PDF]

Contents

  1. The Good Ship “Duff” and Her Strange Cargo
  2. “The Night of Toil”
  3. The Overthrow of Idolatry
  4. Spreading Out
  5. Carrying the Light to Other Groups
  6. The “Messenger of Peace” and Her Useful Work
  7. The Martyred Missionary Polynesia
  8. Further Extension
  9. Teaching and Training Heathen Converts
  10. Joining Hands to Save New Guinea
  11. Summing Up, or Work and Workers in the Older Stations
  12. Other Labourers in the Southern Ocean

Preface

This book is the outcome of the revived interest in the South Seas which the effort to build the steamer John William’s has created. In reading old books descriptive of the early days of the mission I came across so many striking facts unknown to the present generation that a desire to put these facts together in a short connected story grew strong within me.

The first few pages repeat what appears in the opening chapter of “From Island to Island,” but in an altered form. The remainder is newly written. The books to which I am specially indebted are: Ellis’s “Polynesian Researches,” Williams’s “Missionary Enterprises,” Buzacott’s “Mission Life in the Pacific,” Turner’s” Nineteen Years in Polynesia,” Murray’s” Western Polynesia,” and” Forty Years’ Mission Work,” Gill’s “Gems from the Coral Islands,” Dr. Steele’s “New Hebrides and Christian Missions,” “The Night of Toil,” by the author of the “Peep of Day,” and an article entitled “Christian Work in Polynesia,” which appeared in” The Missionary Review of the World. [Continue reading]

Life and Adventures of James Chalmers, aka Tamate

Richard Lovett [1851-1904], Tamate. The Life and Adventures of a Christian HeroThis biography of James Chalmers [1841-1901], martyred missionary to Rarotonga and New Guinea, was written with young boys in mind. My thanks to Redcliffe College for providing a copy of the book for digitisation. This title is in the public domain.

Richard Lovett [1851-1904], Tamate. The Life and Adventures of a Christian Hero. London: The Religious tract Society, [1904]. Hbk. pp.320. [Click to download complete book in PDF]

Contents

  • Preface
  1. A Birth of a Boy
  2. A Call and the Answer
  3. In Perils of Waters
  4. A Pirate the Pacific
  5. The Gem of the Pacific
  6. Off to New Guinea
  7. On the Brink of Death
  8. The Man with the Club
  9. Life in the Tree-tops
  10. A Cruel Revenge
  11. A Noble Savage
  12. Riding Pacific Surges
  13. Life on a Lakatoi
  14. Among the Cannibals of Maipua
  15. How New Guinea Cam under the Flag
  16. Boys whom Tamate Trained
  17. Life at Toaripi
  18. The Wreck of the ‘Harrier’
  19. How Tamate made Friends with Savages
  20. Up and down the Fly River
  21. The End of a Noble Life

Preface

James Chalmers was as brave a man as ever fought in the British Army or Navy. He was as true a hero as any Englishman who has ever been honoured by the nation for victories won in the field or on the sea. The aim of this book is to tell the story of his life in such a way as to interest boys. The main purpose of the author has been to show that Tamate, whose great aim in life was to do good to others, was as bold, as courageous, and as worthy of imitation as any explorer, man of science, soldier, or statesman whose name is famous in British annals.

It is a good thing that young readers, and especially boys, should see that a true Christian man can also be a hero. Tamate loved and served Jesus Christ himself, and from love to Christ spent all his time and strength in making known the love of Jesus to degraded cannibals and fierce savages. In this work he often endured hardship, hunger, fever, shipwreck and weary toil, and on not a few occasions risked even life itself. [Continue reading]

Pioneer Life, Work and Adventure in New Guinea with James Chalmers

James Chalmers [1841-1901]The contents of these two books by James Chalmers [1841-1901] about his work in New Guinea overlap, so I am including them both in the same post. My thanks to Redcliffe College for providing me with a copy to scan. These titles are both in the Public Domain.

James Chalmers [1841-1901] & W. Wyatt Gill [1828-1896], Work Adventure in New Guinea 1877 to 1885. London: The Religious Tract Society, [1885]. Hbk. pp.288. [Click to download complete book in PDF]

James Chalmers [1841-1901], Pioneer Life and Work in New Guinea 1877-1894. London: The Religious Tract Society, 1895. Hbk. pp.255. [Click to download complete book in PDF]

Preface from Pioneer Work and Life [1895]

In 1877 the Rev. James Chalmers joined the New Guinea Mission, and his arrival formed an epoch. in its history. He is wonderfully equipped for the work to which he has, under God’s Providence, put his hand. He is the white man best known to all the natives along the south coast. From the first he had gone among them unarmed, and though not unfrequently in imminent peril, has been marvellously preserved. He has combined the qualities of missionary and explorer in a very high degree, and universally known by the natives as ‘Tamate’ (the nearest approach native lips can make to Chalmers), has added enormously to the stock of our geographical knowledge of New Guinea, and to our accurate acquaintance with the ways of thinking, the habits, superstitions, and mode of life of the various tribes of natives.

This volume contains sketches of his travels and labours in New Guinea during the years 1878 to 1894. Mr. Chalmers has made no effort to work them up into a finished book. Had he attempted· to do so, they would have never seen the light. He is more at home in his whale-boat or steam launch off the New Guinea coast than in his study, and his hand takes more readily to the tiller than to the pen. Hence the bulk of this volume is made up of extracts from journals hastily written while sitting on the platforms of New Guinea houses, surrounded by cannibals, or while resting, after a laborious day’s tramp, under a fly-tent on some outlying spur of the Owen Stanley Mountains, or while sailing along the south-eastern coast or the Fly River. Writing thus, liable to manifold interruptions, Mr. Chalmers has sought to preserve only what was essential to his purpose, viz., to record exactly what he saw and did; how the natives look and speak, and think and act; what in his judgment New Guinea needs, and how her needs can be best. [Continue reading]

Patteson of Melanesia by Frank H.L. Paton

John Coleridge Patteson [1827-1871]
Public Domain photo credit: Wikipedia
Frank Paton retells the life story of John Coleridge Patteson [1827-1871] the missionary bishop of Melanesia for a new generation of readers. My thanks to Redcliffe College for providing me with a copy of the book to scan. This title is in the Public Domain.

Frank H.L. Paton [1870-1938], Patteson of Melanesia. A Brief Life of John Coleridge Patteson, Missionary Bishop. London: SPCK, [1930]. Hbk. pp.209. [Download complete book in PDF]

Contents

  1. The Lure of the Pacific
  2. The Boy and the Man
  3. Meeting His Hero
  4. The Wide Waste of Melanesia
  5. Pioneering with Selwyn
  6. Creating a Native Leadership
  7. Barrier Reefs
  8. The Greatest Thing in the World
  9. “Sticking It”
  10. Father and Son
  11. Selwyn’s Mantle
  12. A Skipper in the Pacific
  13. A Missionary Sandhurst
  14. From Cannibalism to Christianity
  15. Brothers All
  16. The Scourge of Melanesia
  17. “Greater Love Hath No Man Than This”

Epilogue: The Challenge of the Pacific

Preface

The Life of John Coleridge Patteson has been told so well and so fully by Miss Yonge that it requires some courage to tell it again. The only justification for attempting to do so is that this missionary classic has largely passed out of the ken of this generation, and we sorely need the spiritual uplift and inspiration which it never fails to bring to those who read it. Patteson was one of those rare souls who are God’s great gift not to one generation but to all; and, although it is well over fifty years since he laid down his life on the islet of Nukapu, amid the “great wide waste, of Melanesian waters, the message of his life is as living today as it was to the men of his own age. It is a message and an influence which we cannot afford to miss. [Continue Reading]

History of the Society for the Propagation of the Gospel

Georgiana M. Forde [1849/50-1923/1934], Missionary Adventures. A Simple History of the S.P.G.The Society for the Propagation of the Gospel in Foreign Parts (S.P.G) was founded in 1701 as an overseas missionary organisation of the church of England. Georgiana Forde provides us with a short history of the mission in which 15,000 men and women served. The Wikipedia article provides a useful summary here. My thanks to Redcliffe College for providing me with a copy to scan. This book is in the public domain.

Georgiana M. Forde [1849/50-1923/1934], Missionary Adventures. A Simple History of the S.P.G. London: Skeffington & Son, 1911. Hbk. pp.205. [Click to download complete book in PDF]

Contents

  1. The Great Commission – Founding of the S.P.G. – The Discovery of America – The English Settlers in North America in 1607 – Princess Pocahontas – The Pilgrim Fathers – Slavery in the New World – The Rev. George Keith, the first S.P.G. Missionary – Perils of a Sea Voyage – Treatment of Negro Slaves
  2. The Rev. T. Barclay, Missionary to the Red Indians – Queen Anne visited by Red Indian Chiefs – Savage Warfare-War between the French and English in North America – The English victorious under Wolfe in 1759 – The Rev. J. Wesley an S.P.G. Missionary – The American Church asks in vain for Bishops – Revolution in the United States – Independence declared July 4th, 1776.
  3. 40,000 “United Empire Loyalists” settle in Canada and the S.P.G. Missionaries accompany them – Bishops consecrated for the United States – Rev. Charles Inglis in 1787 consecrated Bishop of Nova Scotia: our first Colonial Bishop – Travelling in Canada – The Story of the Shepherd Lad
  4. Newfoundland – The Bermuda Islands – West Indian Hurricanes, Earthquakes, and Volcanoes – Barbados and Codrington College – Jamaica – Diocese of Nassau – Confirmations in the West Indies-Diocese of Antigua – Trinidad – The Asphalte Lake – List of West Indian and South American Dioceses
  5. The. Panama Canal-Vasco Nuneo de Balboa – British Honduras – The Mosquito Indians – The Mahogany Cutters – British Guiana – The Rev. W. H. Brett – S.P.G. Missions to Redmen, East Indians, and Chinese
  6. The First Missionary to Africa, the Rev. Thomas Thompson – The First Black Clergyman, the Rev. Philip Quaque – The West India Church Mission to West Africa – The Rev. W. H. Leacock founds the Rio Pongo Mission – Mohammedanism – Chief Richard Wilkinson’s Story – Foundation Stone laid of Fallangia Church – Rev. W.L. Neville’s Ministry – Conversion of the Devil-man and the greatest Slave-dealer
  7. South Africa – Cape Town and the Rev. Henry Martyn – The first Bishop for South Africa consecrated in 1847 – Bishop Gray’s Visitations and Death – The Wreck of the “Birkenhead,” 1852 – The Bishoprics or Grahamstown and Natal founded – Mother Cecile-The Railway Mission – The Church Order of Ethiopia – Colenso, First Bishop of Natal, 1854 – Bloemfontein made a Bishopric, 1863. A diocese without a single church
  8. Chaka and the Zulu Nation – Bishop Colenso and King Panda – Persecution – The Zulu War: Defeat at Isandhlwana – St. Augustine’s, Rorke’s Drift – Archdeacon Waters, founder of the Church in Kaffraria – Bishop Key of Kaffraria – A Missionary’s Letter – Diocese of Pretoria – The Rand, and the Community of the Resurrection – The Diocese of Mashonaland-Diocese of Lebombo – The Cape de Verde Islands – St. Helena-Ascension – Tristan d’Acunha – Madagascar and Mauritius
  9. The East India Company – St. Thomas and the Syrian Church – The Five Chaplains-Parliament grants W. Wilberforce’s Request for Bishops – Calcutta and her first Bishops – Caste – Bishopric of Madras and Alfred Basil Wood – Bishopric of Bombay-Father Goreh – Lahore and Bishop French – Delhi and its first Christian Church – Burmah and Dr. Marks – The Andaman and Nicobar Islands – Chota Nagpur and the Kols – Tinnevelly and Nazareth – Ceylon
  10. Siam – The Malay Peninsula and Singapore – Borneo, Mr. James Brooke, and Dr. McDougall – The Story of Igoh – China – The Boxer Rising and the S.P.G. Martyrs – Corea: How Christianity first reached Corea – Japan – The Day of Intercession for Foreign Missions, 1872 – The Six Japanese Dioceses – The “Nippon Sei Ko Kwai,” or the Holy Catholic Church of Japan
  11. The first European Peopling of Australia – Bishop Broughton – 1851, the Golden Year – Towns, Bush, Back Country, “Never, Never, Land” – Tasmania – New Guinea – New Zealand and its first Bishop
  12. John Coleridge Patteson, first Bishop of Melanesia – Norfolk Island – Pitcairn Island – Bishop Patteson martyred – Commander Goodenough murdered – Memorial Cross to Bishop Patteson – Bishop John Selwyn and the little Savage – Fiji and the Bishop of Polynesia – The Hawaiian Islands and American Missionaries – Henry Obookiah – Queen Kapiolane and the Goddess of Fire – S.P.G. Mission to the Chinese – Bishop Selwyn’s Diocese sub-divided into Nine

Story of the London Missionary Society by C.S. Horne

C. Silvester Horne, The Story of the L.M.S. with an Appendix Bringing the Story up to the Year 1904, new ednI cannot think of the London Missionary Society without their work in the Pacific Ocean coming to mind. The transformation of the people of the Pacific Islands by the power of the Gospel was truly dramatic and accounts found their way into popular culture through such books as The Coral Island. Much of the information in R.M. Ballantyne’s book was drawn from accounts of missionary’s working there, as Ballantyne had never travelled in the Pacific.

The L.M.S.’s innovative use of missionary ships is noteworthy and their legacy can be found today in such ministries as Mercy Ships and Operation Mobilisation. The work of the L.M.S. however was truly global, reaching Africa, Asia and South America. This book provides a comprehensive account of its work up to 1904. It contains a great many pictures which I wanted to include in greyscale to preserve their quality, so the file size of this book is much higher than usual (22MB).

C. Silvester Horne, The Story of the L.M.S. with an Appendix Bringing the Story up to the Year 1904, new edn. London: London Missionary Society, 1908. Hbk. pp.460. [Click to download in PDF]

Contents

  1. Laying the Foundation
  2. The South Seas
  3. South Africa
  4. India
  5. China
  6. British Guiana
  7. Madagascar
  8. Expansion in Polynesia
  9. Southern and Centra; Africa
  10. Progress in India
  11. Further Work in China
  12. Developments in Madagascar
  13. North China and Mongolia
  14. New Guinea
  15. Summary

Appendix
Index

The London Missionary Society Steamship "John Williams"