Patteson of the Isles by Mary H. Debenham

John Coleridge Patteson

Mary H. Debenham’s short biography of the great South Sea missionary John Coleridge Patteson [1827-1871] entered the public domain this year. My thanks to Redcliffe College for providing a copy of the book for digitisation.

Mary H. Debenham [1864-1947], Patteson of the Isles. London: Oxford University Press, 1921. Hbk. pp.160. [Click to visit the download page]

Contents

  • Foreword
  1. Two Devon Boys
  2. Out to His Great Adventure
  3. Finding His Sea-Legs
  4. ‘The Multitude of the Isles’
  5. The Boys of the Islands
  6. ‘Business in Great Waters’
  7. Father of the Island Sons
  8. The Cruise of the ‘Sea Breeze’
  9. The Road of the Holy Cross
  10. The Weaving of the Net
  11. The Secret of St. Barnabas
  12. The Snatch-Snatch Boats
  13. ‘Port, After Stormy Seas’

Chapter 1: Two Devon Boys

Twelve hundred and odd years ago there was a small boy running about among  the green hills and woods of South Devon, the county that bred Drake and Hawkins and Grenville and many another gentleman adventurer who sailed westward to singe His Spanish Majesty’s beard.

This boy lived long before the days when England was one kingdom; he went about bare-legged and bare-armed, with a tunic to his knee, and talked English in a fashion that few of us would understand. But, underneath the little differences of clothes and language, he was a good deal like other boys of all ages. He probably carried a sling, and knew how to bring down a partridge or a heron. He knew when the golden-brown streams were ready for fishing. He liked to be in for as much of the excitement as possible when the older men hunted a wolf, and he liked the fun of the midsummer fair…

To find more material on John Coleridge Patteson, visit this page.

History of the Melanesian Mission

Eliza Suzanna Armstrong [1836-1908], The History of the Melanesian MissionEliza Susanna Armstrong provides a detailed history of the Melanesian Mission from 1841 to 1899. This region includes what is today Papua New Guinea, Fiji, Vanuatu and the Solomon Islands. My thanks to Redcliffe College for providing a copy of this book for digitisation. This title is in the public domain.

Eliza Suzanna Armstrong [1836-1908], The History of the Melanesian Mission. London: Isbister & Co. Ltd., 1900. Hbk. pp.372. [Download complete book in PDF]

Contents

Part 1

  1. 1841-48. The Melanesian Mission
  2. 1849-52. The Australian Board of Missions
  3. 1853-56. John Coleridge Patteson
  4. 1857-58. Winter School at Lifu
  5. 1858-61. Consecration of John Coleridge Patteson

Part 2

  1. 1861-62. Establishment at Mota
  2. 1863. Peril and Success
  3. 1863-64. In the Australian Colonies
  4. 1864. Deaths of Edwin Nobbs and Fisher Young
  5. 1865-66. The Tree Forts

Part 3

  1. 1867. S. Barnabas, Norfolk Island
  2. 1868-69. The Labour Trade in Melanesia
  3. 1870. Internal Management of Mission
  4. 1871.
  5. The Bishop’s Last Journey

Part 4

  1. 1871-72. Mr. Codrington as Head of the Mission
  2. 1873. The First Melanesian Priest
  3. 1874. The New Southern Cross
  4. 1875. Mr. Codrington in the Islands
  5. 1876. Mr. Selwyn’s Tour
  6. 1871. The Consecration of John Richardson Selwyn

Part 5

  1. 1877. The Way Open to Santa Cruz
  2. 1878. In the Santa Cruz Islands
  3. 1879. Teachers’ Meeting at Mota – Census
  4. 1880. Consecration of S. Barnabas
  5. 1881. Justice Done in the Floridas
  6. 1882. Ordination of Charles Sapibuana
  7. 1883. Great Advance in Florida
  8. 1884. Memorial Cross at Nukapu
  9. 1885. Clement Marau at Ulawa
  10. 1886. Mrs. J. Selwyn’s Visit to the Islands
  11. 1887. Retirement of Dr. Codrington
  12. 1888. The Parliament of the Floridas
  13. 1889. The Baptism of Soga
  14. 1890. Serious Illness of the Bishop
  15. 1891. The Bishop Leaves for England – His Resignation
  16. 1892. Visit of the Bishop of Tasmania
  17. 1893. British Protectorate in the Solomons

Part 6

  1. 1894. The Consecration of the Cecil Wilson
  2. 1895. S. Luke’s, Siota
  3. 1896. Women’s Work in the Mission
  4. 1897. Difficulties in Queensland
  5. 1898. Death of Bishop John Selwyn
  6. 1899. The Jubilee of the Mission

 

Life and Adventures of James Chalmers, aka Tamate

Richard Lovett [1851-1904], Tamate. The Life and Adventures of a Christian HeroThis biography of James Chalmers [1841-1901], martyred missionary to Rarotonga and New Guinea, was written with young boys in mind. My thanks to Redcliffe College for providing a copy of the book for digitisation. This title is in the public domain.

Richard Lovett [1851-1904], Tamate. The Life and Adventures of a Christian Hero. London: The Religious tract Society, [1904]. Hbk. pp.320. [Click to download complete book in PDF]

Contents

  • Preface
  1. A Birth of a Boy
  2. A Call and the Answer
  3. In Perils of Waters
  4. A Pirate the Pacific
  5. The Gem of the Pacific
  6. Off to New Guinea
  7. On the Brink of Death
  8. The Man with the Club
  9. Life in the Tree-tops
  10. A Cruel Revenge
  11. A Noble Savage
  12. Riding Pacific Surges
  13. Life on a Lakatoi
  14. Among the Cannibals of Maipua
  15. How New Guinea Cam under the Flag
  16. Boys whom Tamate Trained
  17. Life at Toaripi
  18. The Wreck of the ‘Harrier’
  19. How Tamate made Friends with Savages
  20. Up and down the Fly River
  21. The End of a Noble Life

Preface

James Chalmers was as brave a man as ever fought in the British Army or Navy. He was as true a hero as any Englishman who has ever been honoured by the nation for victories won in the field or on the sea. The aim of this book is to tell the story of his life in such a way as to interest boys. The main purpose of the author has been to show that Tamate, whose great aim in life was to do good to others, was as bold, as courageous, and as worthy of imitation as any explorer, man of science, soldier, or statesman whose name is famous in British annals.

It is a good thing that young readers, and especially boys, should see that a true Christian man can also be a hero. Tamate loved and served Jesus Christ himself, and from love to Christ spent all his time and strength in making known the love of Jesus to degraded cannibals and fierce savages. In this work he often endured hardship, hunger, fever, shipwreck and weary toil, and on not a few occasions risked even life itself. [Continue reading]

Patteson of Melanesia by Frank H.L. Paton

John Coleridge Patteson [1827-1871]
Public Domain photo credit: Wikipedia
Frank Paton retells the life story of John Coleridge Patteson [1827-1871] the missionary bishop of Melanesia for a new generation of readers. My thanks to Redcliffe College for providing me with a copy of the book to scan. This title is in the Public Domain.

Frank H.L. Paton [1870-1938], Patteson of Melanesia. A Brief Life of John Coleridge Patteson, Missionary Bishop. London: SPCK, [1930]. Hbk. pp.209. [Download complete book in PDF]

Contents

  1. The Lure of the Pacific
  2. The Boy and the Man
  3. Meeting His Hero
  4. The Wide Waste of Melanesia
  5. Pioneering with Selwyn
  6. Creating a Native Leadership
  7. Barrier Reefs
  8. The Greatest Thing in the World
  9. “Sticking It”
  10. Father and Son
  11. Selwyn’s Mantle
  12. A Skipper in the Pacific
  13. A Missionary Sandhurst
  14. From Cannibalism to Christianity
  15. Brothers All
  16. The Scourge of Melanesia
  17. “Greater Love Hath No Man Than This”

Epilogue: The Challenge of the Pacific

Preface

The Life of John Coleridge Patteson has been told so well and so fully by Miss Yonge that it requires some courage to tell it again. The only justification for attempting to do so is that this missionary classic has largely passed out of the ken of this generation, and we sorely need the spiritual uplift and inspiration which it never fails to bring to those who read it. Patteson was one of those rare souls who are God’s great gift not to one generation but to all; and, although it is well over fifty years since he laid down his life on the islet of Nukapu, amid the “great wide waste, of Melanesian waters, the message of his life is as living today as it was to the men of his own age. It is a message and an influence which we cannot afford to miss. [Continue Reading]