Missionary Principles and Practice by Robert E. Speer

A handbook on missionary principles by the American Presbyterian missiologist Robert Elliott Speer [1867-1947]. My thanks to Redcliffe College for providing a copy of this public domain book for digitisation.

Robert E. Speer [1867-1947], Missionary Principles and Practice. A Discussion of Christian Missions and of some Criticisms upon them, 3rd edn. New York/London: Fleming H. Revell Co., 1902. Hbk. pp.552. [Click to visit the Robert Speer page to download this and other titles by this author. My thanks to Dr James A. Patterson for his bibliography]

Contents

  • Preface
  • Part I. General Principles Stated
  1. Missions—Primary and Essential in Christianity
  2. Common Honesty and Foreign Missions
  3. The Need of the Non-Christian World for Christ
  4. What are Christian Missionaries Trying to Do?
  5. The Aim of Christian Missions
  6. The Science of Missions
  7. The Kind of Men Needed in Foreign Missions
  8. Some Current Criticisms of Missions
  9. The Assumption Underlying Missionary Criticism
  10. Missions and Spiritual Life
  11. Missionaries and Their Rights
  12. Christianity the Solitary and Sufficient Religion

    Part II. General Principles Applied
  13. The Iniquity of Christian Missions in China
  14. Are the Missionaries Responsible for the Troubles in China?
  15. The Scuttle Policy in China
  16. Has Missionary Work in China Been Worth While?
  17. Minister Wu’s Confucian Propaganda
  18. A Roman Catholic View of Missions in China
  19. Higher Education in Missions with Special Reference to Conditions in China
  20. Truth or Tolerance
  21. Some Missionary Aspects of Paul’s First Itineration
  22. Some Missionary Aspects of Paul’s Second Itineration

    Part III. Need and Results
  23. Impressions of Christian Missions in Asia
  24. Persian Mohammedans and Mohammedanism
  25. Glimpses of Life on a Persian Highway
  26. On the Corpse Road
  27. Why Christianity Appeals to the Japanese
  28. Shosaburo Aoyama, A Japanese Christian Gentleman
  29. Four Life Stories
  30. Pastor Tsiang’s Story
  31. A Chinese Preacher
  32. Two Korean Christians
  33. Missionary Biographies
  34. Missionary Heroism I Have Known
  35. Li Hung Chang and Christian Missions
  36. The Civilizing Influence of Missions
  37. The Propagation of Christianity in the Last Century

    Part IV. Privilege and Duty
  38. The Missionary Spirit of the Christian Life
  39. Christ, the Desire of the Nations
  40. What Christ Has Done for Woman
  41. Prayer and Missions
  42. The Holy Spirit and Missions
  43. The Resources of the Christian Church
  44. The Evangelization of the World in this Generation
  45. The Speedy Bringing of the World to Christ

Timothy Richard of China

Timothy Richard in the Library at Shanghai

Timothy Richard was born in Wales and was converted during the 1859-60 Revival. He responded to the call to overseas service and served with the Baptist Missionary Society in China. He became convinced that the indigenous church should be self-supporting and that evangelism was best done by native Chinese Christians. The Ex-patriate missionaries should devote their time to working with the intelligentsia of China and combine outreach with development. After the Boxer uprising of 1900 he was instrumental in the establishment of Shanghai University.

My thanks to Redcliffe College for making a copy of this public domain title available for digitisation.

William E. Soothill [1861-1935], Timothy Richard of China. Seer, Statesman, Missionary & Most Disinterested Adviser the Chinese Ever Had. London: Seeley, Service & Co. Ltd., 1924. Hbk. pp.330.

Visit the Timothy Richard page for the download link for this title and other resources.

Contents

  1. Foreword
  2. Early Life in Wales
  3. China in the Sixties
  4. Pioneering in Shantung & Manchuria
  5. Chefoo
  6. Farewell to Chefoo
  7. Ch’ing-Choo-Fu
  8. Famine Relief: Shantung
  9. Famine Relief: Shansi
  10. Pioneering in Shansi
  11. Developments in Shansi
  12. T’ai-yuan, Ch’ing-Chou & Peking
  13. First Furlough
  14. In Exile
  15. Christian Literature Society: Work in Shanghai
  16. Chino-Japanese War
  17. T’ien-T’ai
  18. Enlightening the Government on Missions
  19. The Reform Society
  20. Second Furlough
  21. The Reform Movement
  22. Second Furlough
  23. The Reform Movement
  24. The Boxer Madness
  25. The Shansi University: A Dream Fulfilled
  26. Between the Boxers & The Revolution
  27. Conferences at Home
  28. Visits to Japan & Korea
  29. The Revolution
  30. Buddhism
  31. Home Again
  • Index

Foreword

Dr Timothy Richard the subject of this biography, which must have been a labour of love to Professor Soothill, his co-worker in later years, was for over forty years an outstanding personality in China, and gained the respect and esteem of the Chinese people in a degree which it has been given to few foreigners to attain. My recollection of him dates from the seventies of last century, when he and a few other devoted missionaries threw themselves into the formidable task of organizing relief work in connection with an appalling famine in Shansi, and laid the foundation of all the subsequent efforts which have been made with so much success to cope with these constantly recurring calamities in China. Dr Richard’s work in Shansi brought him into close relations with the ruling classes, and convinced him of the necessity of diffusing throughout the country a knowledge of the humanitarian principles and methods of government practised in the West…

Biography of Archibald Orr Ewing

Archibald Orr Ewing [1857-1930]
Archibald Orr Ewing [1857-1930]

Archibald Orr Ewing [1857-1930] was born into a wealthy family in Scotland. Deeply influenced by his experience of the revival in Glasgow led by D.L. Moody in 1882 and by attending the Keswick Convention in 1885 he devoted himself to missionary service. He served with the China Inland Mission from 1886 to 1911.

My thanks to Book Aid for making a copy of this public domain title available for digitisation.

Marshall Broomhall [1866-1937], Archibald Orr Ewing. ‘That faithful and wise Steward’. London: China Inland Mission, 1930. Hbk. pp.150. [Click to visit the download page]

Contents

  • Foreword
  • A Celebrated Lawsuit
  • Things Temporal
  • Things Eternal
  • A Living Gospel
  • A Willing Servant
  • A Living Sacrifice
  • A Comforter of Many
  • A Cheerful; Giver
  • A Man in Christ
  • A Better Possession
  • Epilogue

Foreword

There are many men and women who have gladly devoted their lives to the mission field; there are many others who have generously given of their substance for the same cause; but only a few have been privileged to do both. Archibald Orr Ewing was one of these few. Though as a young man he inherited wealth, and had this world’s best before him, he definitely, unostentatiously, and wholly placed himself and his possessions on God’s altar for service.

Every soul is a sanctuary, and its true history can, at best, only be known in part by others. ‘The secret things belong unto the Lord our God; but the things that are revealed belong unto us and to our children for ever.’ That so much can be revealed of the inner history of Archibald Orr Ewing’ s life is due to the wealth of material placed at the writer’s disposal…

Page vii.

James Gilmour and His Boys

James Gilmour and His Boys

The “Boys” of the title are James Gilmour’s two sons, James and Willie. They had been sent back from China to England to school after the death of their Mother. This book is a selection of James Gilmour letters to them.

My thanks to Redcliffe College for providing a copy of this public domain title for digitisation.

Richard Lovett [1851-1904], James Gilmour and His Boys. London: Religious Tract Society, 1894. Hbk. pp.288. [Click to visit the download page]

Contents

  1. Introduction
  2. The Boyhood and Youth of James Gilmour
  3. Adventures in Central Mongolia
  4. Life And Work in Eastern Mongolia
  5. Second Visit to England, and Closing Years
  6. Last Days
  7. Pen-Pictures For Children, By Mr. Gilmour

Introduction

This volume is very different from all its forerunners in the New Year Gift Book Series; but I think the readers of it will find that it can well hold its own both in interest and in helpfulness with any of them. Some of those were biographies of great missionaries; some were descriptions of heathen children to whom your gifts were bringing the light and joy of the gospel; some were accounts of thrilling adventures and hard work done for Jesus Christ in North America, in New Guinea, in China, in India, in Mongolia, and in other distant parts of the earth.

The book is partly a biography, partly a series of adventures, partly a story of work done for Jesus Christ and of very hard trials bravely endured for Him and from love to sinful men…

page.9.

Your will find more material about James Gilmour here.

Behind the Ranges. Fraser of Lisuland S.W. China

James Outram Fraser [1886–1938]
 James Outram Fraser [1886–1938]
James Outram Fraser [1886–1938] was an English missionary who divided his time between China and Burma, working amongst the Lisu people who lives along the border. He worked on translating the New Testament in the Lisu language and established churches that were both funded and led by the Lisu converts.

My thanks to OMF International (UK) for their permission to place this in-copyright book on-line. It may be downloaded and used for free educational purposes, but may not be sold for profit without written permission from the copyrgiht holder. My thanks to Book Aid for making a copy available for digtisation.

Mrs Howard Taylor (aka. Mary Geraldine Guinness [1865-1949], Behind the Ranges. Fraser of Lisuland S.W. China. London & Redhill: Lutterworth Press & China Inland Mission, n.d. Hbk. pp.253. [Click to visit the download page]

Contents

  • Foreword
  1. Beginnings
  2. Young Life
  3. The Real Issue
  4. Mountain Men
  5. Missionary in Charge
  6. Banished to Burma
  7. Lisuland Again
  8. A Challenge
  9. A Decision
  10. Powers of Darkness
  11. A Fruitful Interlude
  12. The Prayer of Faith
  13. The Sword-Ladder Festival
  14. ‘Who Teacheth Like Him ?’
  15. The Letter Never Written
  16. ‘I Sent You To Reap’
  17. Love and Patience
  18. Blood of His Own
  19. A New Call
  20. ‘Good Ground’
  21. ‘A Hundredfold’
  22. The End in View
  23. Love’s Endurance
  24. Love’s Reward
  25. Marriage and Wider Ministry
  26. Fulfilment and Translation
  • Farewell

Pastor Hsi. Confucian Scholar and Christian by Geraldine Taylor

Pastor Hsi (Xi Shengmo)
Pastor Hsi (Xi Shengmo). Source: Wikipedia

Thanks largely to this book, there is more written about Pastor Hsi (Xi Shengmo) than any other 19th protestant Chinese Christian.  Hsi is notable for the way that he, rather than western missionaries, led the work of establishing churches and clinics for opium users in the areas where he worked.

My thanks to OMF International-UK for their permission to digitise and host this important book. It may be downloaded and used for free educational purposes, but not sold for profit without the explicit written permission of the copyright holder.

Geraldine Taylor [1865-1949], Pastor Hsi: Confucian Scholar and Christian, 23rd edn. London: China Inland Mission, 1900. Hbk. pp.293. [Click to visit the download page]

Contents

  • Editorial Note
  • Foreword
  • Introduction
  • Extracts from the Introduction written for the first edition by D.E. Hoste
  1. The Home of His Childhood
  2. Wedding an Unknown Bride
  3. Winning a Reputation
  4. The Swift Descent
  5. Dark Days in Shansi
  6. Light at Last
  7. Fishers of Men
  8. Drawing in the Net
  9. The Living Christ
  10. Stronger than All the Powers of the Enemy
  11. Called to Life Service
  12. The Great Change
  13. “Conqueror of Demons”
  14. Early Success and Failure
  15. Growing in Grace
  16. Starving the Village Idols
  17. Under-Shepherds: A Problem
  18. Light on the Problem
  19. Finding His Life-Work
  20. A Visit to the Capital
  21. How the Work Spread
  22. How God Provided
  23. A Fresh Advance
  24. Reinforcements
  25. Not Against Flesh and Blood
  26. For the Work of the Ministry
  27. West of the River
  28. A Winter’s Work at Hungtung
  29. Through Fire and Through Water
  30. A Wealthy Place
  31. The Burden and Heat of the Day
  32. The Refuges as Mission Stations
  33. The Middle Eden
  34. Ready to Depart
  35. Higher Service
  • Hymn by Pastor Hsi

Twelve Mighty Missionaries by Esthme Ethelind Enock [1874-1947]

Esthme Ethelind Enock [1874-1947], Twelve Mighty MissionariesEsthme Enock’s biographical sketches of 12 famous missionaries has just entered the public domain. This copy was kindly provided by Book Aid for digitisation.

In the table of contents below I have linked to the bibligraphy pages on Missiology.org.uk, where you will find further material on each missionary.

Esthme Ethelind Enock [1874-1947], Twelve Mighty Missionaries. London: Pickering & Inglis, Ltd., 1936. Hbk. pp.95. [Click to visit the download page]

Contents

  1. Pastor Hsi, China
  2. James Chalmers, New Guinea
  3. Alexander Mackay, Uganda
  4. Anthony Norris Groves, India
  5. Alexander Duff, India
  6. John Williams, Erromanga
  7. Samuel Marsden, Maoriland
  8. Samuel Pollard, China
  9. Hudson Taylor, China
  10. C.T. Studd, Central Africa
  11. Dan Crawford, Central Africa
  12. Dr Richard Williams, Tierra Del Fuego

Chapter 1. Pastor Hsi, China

The exact date of Pastor Hsi’s birthday does not seem to be recorded, but he was born probably in the Autumn of 1836. Till he was seven years old the little Hsi lived the usual free life of the son of a Chinese scholar, and was encouraged in every way to be overbearing and self-willed. Then he was sent to school, a school where a shrine of Confucius occupied the place of honour. Here the boy begins the studies which, it is hoped, will make him a “Princely Man.”

But, favourable though circumstances are, they do not satisfy the heart of this boy. At the early age of eight years, as he wandered through the incense-filled Temple and gazed at the hideous idols and vivid representations of punishments and terrors beyond the grave, he would ask himself, what was the use of living. “Men find no good, and in the end—?” he said to himself….

Life and Letters of the Rev. Henry Martyn, B.D.

Henry Martyn
Henry Martyn. Image source: Wikipedia

This collection of the writings of Henry Martyn can be divided into three parts. The first two are selections from his journals and the third drawn from his account of a visit to Shiraz in Persia. My thanks to the Cambridge Centre for Christianity Worldwide for making this book available for digitisation. This title is in the public domain.

John Sargent [1780-1833], The Life and Letters of the Rev. Henry Martyn. London: Seeley & Co., 1885. Hbk. pp.463. [Click to visit the download page]

Contents

  • Preface
  • Preface to 10th Edition
  1. Early life of Henry Martyn – His successful academical career
  2. His advancement in piety – College employments – Decides on becoming a Missionary – His Ordination
  3. Commencement of his Ministerial labours-Collegiate Duties – Applies for a Chaplainship under the East India Company – Visits Cornwall – His sufferings on leaving England
  4. Departure from Eugland – Occurrences during his Voyage – At St. Salvador – And at the Cape of Good Hope – Arrives at Madras – And at Calcutta
  5. Mr. Martyn’s arrival at Calcutta – Residence at Aldeen – Preaches at Calcutta – Is appointed to Diuapore- Leaves Calcutta – Journal of his voyage up the Hoogly and Ganges
  6. Mr. Martyn is fixed at Dinapore – Commences his Ministry – Translations – Disputes with his Moonshee and Pundit – Difficulties respecting the Schools – His happiness in the work of Translation
  7. Mr. Martyn receives intelligence of the death of his eldest Sister – Letters to his friends – Is removed to Cawnpore – Hears of the death of his youngest Sister – Determines to visit Arabia and Persia -Leaves Cawnpore for Calcutta – Departs for Arabia
  8. Mr. Martyn leaves Bengal for Shiraz-Occurrences during his journey – Arrives at Shiraz – Commences a New Translation – Discussions with the Persian Moollahs
  9. First Public Discussion at Shiraz – Mr. Martyn replies to a Defence of Mohammedanism – Interview with the Head of the Soofies – Visits Persepolis – Translations – Discussions
  10. Mr. Martyn leaves Shiraz in order to lay before the King his Translation of the New Testament – Arrives at the camp – Is not admitted to an audience – Proceeds to Tebriz – Severe illness
  11. Mr. Martyn commences his journey homewards, by way of Constantinople – Visits Ech-Miazin – Suffers from fever – Dies at Tocat in Persia – View of his Character – Conclusion
  • APPENDIX: Letters to Miss Grenfell

For more resources on Henry Martyn, visit this page.

Patteson of the Isles by Mary H. Debenham

John Coleridge Patteson

Mary H. Debenham’s short biography of the great South Sea missionary John Coleridge Patteson [1827-1871] entered the public domain this year. My thanks to Redcliffe College for providing a copy of the book for digitisation.

Mary H. Debenham [1864-1947], Patteson of the Isles. London: Oxford University Press, 1921. Hbk. pp.160. [Click to visit the download page]

Contents

  • Foreword
  1. Two Devon Boys
  2. Out to His Great Adventure
  3. Finding His Sea-Legs
  4. ‘The Multitude of the Isles’
  5. The Boys of the Islands
  6. ‘Business in Great Waters’
  7. Father of the Island Sons
  8. The Cruise of the ‘Sea Breeze’
  9. The Road of the Holy Cross
  10. The Weaving of the Net
  11. The Secret of St. Barnabas
  12. The Snatch-Snatch Boats
  13. ‘Port, After Stormy Seas’

Chapter 1: Two Devon Boys

Twelve hundred and odd years ago there was a small boy running about among  the green hills and woods of South Devon, the county that bred Drake and Hawkins and Grenville and many another gentleman adventurer who sailed westward to singe His Spanish Majesty’s beard.

This boy lived long before the days when England was one kingdom; he went about bare-legged and bare-armed, with a tunic to his knee, and talked English in a fashion that few of us would understand. But, underneath the little differences of clothes and language, he was a good deal like other boys of all ages. He probably carried a sling, and knew how to bring down a partridge or a heron. He knew when the golden-brown streams were ready for fishing. He liked to be in for as much of the excitement as possible when the older men hunted a wolf, and he liked the fun of the midsummer fair…

To find more material on John Coleridge Patteson, visit this page.

Griffith John: A Voice from China

Griffith John [1831-1912], A Voice From China
Griffith John. Image source – Wikipdia.
Griffith John [1831-1912], having been prevented by illness from returning home from China, sent instead this collection of his writings in order to stir others to new missionary endeavours.

My thanks to Redcliffe College for providing a copy of this book for digitisation. This title is in the public domain.

Griffith John [1831-1912], A Voice From China. London: James Clarke & Co., 1917. Hbk. pp.271. [Click to visit the download page]

Contents

  • Preface
  1. Then and Now
  2. The Supreme Motive in Christian Missions
  3. The Ideal Christian Life
  4. Why Do I Believe in Missions
  5. The Message
  6. The Missionary
  7. The Tract in China
  8. The Bible in China
  9. The Source of Power
  10. The Gospel in Hupeh
  11. The Gospel in Hunan
  12. Fear Not

Chapter 1: Then and Now

We have just reached the close of the first hundred years of Protestant missions in China, and I wish to call attention to the contrast between the present and the past. If we compare the state of things to-day with the state of things existing in China in Dr. Morrison’s day, we shall be able to some extent to realise how great is the work which has been wrought of God during this period in that great empire. We may also notice that the progress of Christian missions in China is but typical of the advance that has been made throughout the world in the same period. When Dr. Morrison went to China the country was, both legally and practically, closed to the missionary and to the Gospel. In those days it was a crime for a Chinese to teach, or for a foreigner to learn, the language…

Click here for more material on Griffith John.