Twelve Mighty Missionaries by Esthme Ethelind Enock [1874-1947]

Esthme Ethelind Enock [1874-1947], Twelve Mighty MissionariesEsthme Enock’s biographical sketches of 12 famous missionaries has just entered the public domain. This copy was kindly provided by Book Aid for digitisation.

In the table of contents below I have linked to the bibligraphy pages on Missiology.org.uk, where you will find further material on each missionary.

Esthme Ethelind Enock [1874-1947], Twelve Mighty Missionaries. London: Pickering & Inglis, Ltd., 1936. Hbk. pp.95. [Click to visit the download page]

Contents

  1. Pastor Hsi, China
  2. James Chalmers, New Guinea
  3. Alexander Mackay, Uganda
  4. Anthony Norris Groves, India
  5. Alexander Duff, India
  6. John Williams, Erromanga
  7. Samuel Marsden, Maoriland
  8. Samuel Pollard, China
  9. Hudson Taylor, China
  10. C.T. Studd, Central Africa
  11. Dan Crawford, Central Africa
  12. Dr Richard Williams, Tierra Del Fuego

Chapter 1. Pastor Hsi, China

The exact date of Pastor Hsi’s birthday does not seem to be recorded, but he was born probably in the Autumn of 1836. Till he was seven years old the little Hsi lived the usual free life of the son of a Chinese scholar, and was encouraged in every way to be overbearing and self-willed. Then he was sent to school, a school where a shrine of Confucius occupied the place of honour. Here the boy begins the studies which, it is hoped, will make him a “Princely Man.”

But, favourable though circumstances are, they do not satisfy the heart of this boy. At the early age of eight years, as he wandered through the incense-filled Temple and gazed at the hideous idols and vivid representations of punishments and terrors beyond the grave, he would ask himself, what was the use of living. “Men find no good, and in the end—?” he said to himself….

Life and Letters of the Rev. Henry Martyn, B.D.

Henry Martyn
Henry Martyn. Image source: Wikipedia

This collection of the writings of Henry Martyn can be divided into three parts. The first two are selections from his journals and the third drawn from his account of a visit to Shiraz in Persia. My thanks to the Cambridge Centre for Christianity Worldwide for making this book available for digitisation. This title is in the public domain.

John Sargent [1780-1833], The Life and Letters of the Rev. Henry Martyn. London: Seeley & Co., 1885. Hbk. pp.463. [Click to visit the download page]

Contents

  • Preface
  • Preface to 10th Edition
  1. Early life of Henry Martyn – His successful academical career
  2. His advancement in piety – College employments – Decides on becoming a Missionary – His Ordination
  3. Commencement of his Ministerial labours-Collegiate Duties – Applies for a Chaplainship under the East India Company – Visits Cornwall – His sufferings on leaving England
  4. Departure from Eugland – Occurrences during his Voyage – At St. Salvador – And at the Cape of Good Hope – Arrives at Madras – And at Calcutta
  5. Mr. Martyn’s arrival at Calcutta – Residence at Aldeen – Preaches at Calcutta – Is appointed to Diuapore- Leaves Calcutta – Journal of his voyage up the Hoogly and Ganges
  6. Mr. Martyn is fixed at Dinapore – Commences his Ministry – Translations – Disputes with his Moonshee and Pundit – Difficulties respecting the Schools – His happiness in the work of Translation
  7. Mr. Martyn receives intelligence of the death of his eldest Sister – Letters to his friends – Is removed to Cawnpore – Hears of the death of his youngest Sister – Determines to visit Arabia and Persia -Leaves Cawnpore for Calcutta – Departs for Arabia
  8. Mr. Martyn leaves Bengal for Shiraz-Occurrences during his journey – Arrives at Shiraz – Commences a New Translation – Discussions with the Persian Moollahs
  9. First Public Discussion at Shiraz – Mr. Martyn replies to a Defence of Mohammedanism – Interview with the Head of the Soofies – Visits Persepolis – Translations – Discussions
  10. Mr. Martyn leaves Shiraz in order to lay before the King his Translation of the New Testament – Arrives at the camp – Is not admitted to an audience – Proceeds to Tebriz – Severe illness
  11. Mr. Martyn commences his journey homewards, by way of Constantinople – Visits Ech-Miazin – Suffers from fever – Dies at Tocat in Persia – View of his Character – Conclusion
  • APPENDIX: Letters to Miss Grenfell

For more resources on Henry Martyn, visit this page.

Patteson of the Isles by Mary H. Debenham

John Coleridge Patteson

Mary H. Debenham’s short biography of the great South Sea missionary John Coleridge Patteson [1827-1871] entered the public domain this year. My thanks to Redcliffe College for providing a copy of the book for digitisation.

Mary H. Debenham [1864-1947], Patteson of the Isles. London: Oxford University Press, 1921. Hbk. pp.160. [Click to visit the download page]

Contents

  • Foreword
  1. Two Devon Boys
  2. Out to His Great Adventure
  3. Finding His Sea-Legs
  4. ‘The Multitude of the Isles’
  5. The Boys of the Islands
  6. ‘Business in Great Waters’
  7. Father of the Island Sons
  8. The Cruise of the ‘Sea Breeze’
  9. The Road of the Holy Cross
  10. The Weaving of the Net
  11. The Secret of St. Barnabas
  12. The Snatch-Snatch Boats
  13. ‘Port, After Stormy Seas’

Chapter 1: Two Devon Boys

Twelve hundred and odd years ago there was a small boy running about among  the green hills and woods of South Devon, the county that bred Drake and Hawkins and Grenville and many another gentleman adventurer who sailed westward to singe His Spanish Majesty’s beard.

This boy lived long before the days when England was one kingdom; he went about bare-legged and bare-armed, with a tunic to his knee, and talked English in a fashion that few of us would understand. But, underneath the little differences of clothes and language, he was a good deal like other boys of all ages. He probably carried a sling, and knew how to bring down a partridge or a heron. He knew when the golden-brown streams were ready for fishing. He liked to be in for as much of the excitement as possible when the older men hunted a wolf, and he liked the fun of the midsummer fair…

To find more material on John Coleridge Patteson, visit this page.

Griffith John: A Voice from China

Griffith John [1831-1912], A Voice From China
Griffith John. Image source – Wikipdia.
Griffith John [1831-1912], having been prevented by illness from returning home from China, sent instead this collection of his writings in order to stir others to new missionary endeavours.

My thanks to Redcliffe College for providing a copy of this book for digitisation. This title is in the public domain.

Griffith John [1831-1912], A Voice From China. London: James Clarke & Co., 1917. Hbk. pp.271. [Click to visit the download page]

Contents

  • Preface
  1. Then and Now
  2. The Supreme Motive in Christian Missions
  3. The Ideal Christian Life
  4. Why Do I Believe in Missions
  5. The Message
  6. The Missionary
  7. The Tract in China
  8. The Bible in China
  9. The Source of Power
  10. The Gospel in Hupeh
  11. The Gospel in Hunan
  12. Fear Not

Chapter 1: Then and Now

We have just reached the close of the first hundred years of Protestant missions in China, and I wish to call attention to the contrast between the present and the past. If we compare the state of things to-day with the state of things existing in China in Dr. Morrison’s day, we shall be able to some extent to realise how great is the work which has been wrought of God during this period in that great empire. We may also notice that the progress of Christian missions in China is but typical of the advance that has been made throughout the world in the same period. When Dr. Morrison went to China the country was, both legally and practically, closed to the missionary and to the Gospel. In those days it was a crime for a Chinese to teach, or for a foreigner to learn, the language…

Click here for more material on Griffith John.

Alexander Mackay -The Christian Hero of Uganda

Alexander Mackay. The Christian Hero of UgandaThis short biography of Alexander Mackey [1849-1890] is one of Paternoster Press’s “Memoir Series of Might Men and Women”. My thanks to Redcliffe College for providing me with a copy of this book for digitisation. This title is in the public domain.

James Joseph Ellis {1853-?], Alexander Mackay. The Christian Hero of Uganda, revised & enlarged by Esthme Ethelind Enock [1874-1947]. London: Pickering & Inglis Ltd., [1938]. Hbk. pp.95. [Click here to visit the download page]

Contents

  1. The Boy
  2. A Mother’s Prayer Answered
  3. A Letter
  4. Mackay Begins Road-Making
  5. A Rush Up to the Lake
  6. Entebbe and Uganda at Last
  7. Mackay Meets King Mtesa
  8. Mtesa’s Difficulties
  9. Arab, Priest, and Witch
  10. “The Graphic,” The Plague, and the Cart
  11. Twlce Born-Twice Dead
  12. The Passing of King Mtes
  13. Under Mwanga’s Rule
  14. The Journey Done

Chapter 1: The Boy

October 13th, 1849, in the village of Rhynie,  near Aberdeen, a little boy was born. He was Alexander Mackay, whose life was so closely interwoven with African Missions, ·and who, later, was known as Mackay of the Great Lake-Victoria Nyanza.

At the time of his birth it was bitterly cold and snowy in the windswept valley at the foot of those stem Scottish hills.

Rhynie lies in the beautiful level below Tap O’ Noth. Alec’s father was minister of Rhynie Free Church. The rugged-looking little house in wh:ch Alexander Mackay was born is still standing, an object of great interest to those who revere the intrepid preachers of the Gospel among the heathen.

In 1851 the new Free Church was building close to the Manse, and the little boy was busy every day with trowel and mortar, among the stones. The workmen loved to have him there….

Click here for more material on Alexander Mackay

Deaville Walker’s Biography of William Carey

William Carey: Frontipiece
William Carey: Frontipiece

Walker’s biography of the great missionary pioneer William Carey [1761-1834] is based on the older works by J.C. Marshman (1859) and Eustace Carey (1836)., but adds new material from his own research. My thanks to the Cambridge Centre for Christianity Worldwide for making a copy of this title available for digitisation. This book is in th public domain.

F. Deaville Walker [1878-1945], William Carey. Missionary Pioneer and Statesman. London: Student Christian Movement, 1926. Hbk. pp.320. [Click to visit the download page]

Contents

  • Editorial Note
  • Author’s Preface
  1. Childhood in the Weavers’ Cottage
  2. Boyhood at the Village School
  3. The Shoemaker’s Apprentice
  4. Early Work as a Voluntary Preacher
  5. Moulton and the Missionary Call
  6. Leicester: Days of Trial and Conflict
  7. The Enquiry: Carey’s First Great Achievement
  8. The Formation of the Baptist Missionary Society
  9. Planning the Campaign
  10. Facing the Problems
  11. The Voyage to India
  12. India When Carey Landed
  13. Arrival in India: Dark Days
  14. Into the Wilderness
  15. Mudnabatty – Carey’s Second Apprenticeship
  16. Planning a Forward Movement
  17. A Refuge Under the Danish Flag
  18. A Wonderful Year At Serampore: The Mission Established
  19. Converts, Trials, and Progress
  20. Carey Becomes a College Professor
  21. Service for Humanity
  22. The Greatest Fight of All
  23. The Scriptures in Forty Languages
  24. Founding a College
  25. Sorrow Upon Sorrow
  26. Carey’s Private Life at Serampore
  27. “Not a Single Desire Ungratified”

Index

Author’s Preface

William Carey’s life-work falls into two distinct periods: the English period when, almost singlehanded, he faced and overcame the prevailing indifference and hostility to missionary effort, thought out a well-developed scheme, published his amazing “Enquiry,” and in the end almost compelled timid and hesitating men to form a Society for the evangelization of the world; and the Indian period, during which he put his ideas into practice, developing almost every form of missionary agency, translating the Scriptures into numerous languages, founding a splendid Christian college, and winning the confidence of one Governor-General after another. From being a simple shoemaker and village preacher, this man became so skilled a linguist that at the age of forty he was appointed Professor of Bengali, Sanskrit, and Marathi in the Governor-General’s college in Calcutta-a post he filled with distinction for thirty years…

For more material on William Carey, go here.

Canon W.H. Temple Gairdner of Cairo’s Letters to His Friends

W.H. Temple Gairdner [1873-1928], W.H.T.G. to His FriendsWilliam Henry Temple Gairdner (July 31, 1873 – May 22, 1928) was a British Christian missionary with the Church Missionary Society in Cairo, Egypt. His entire life was dedicated to service in Egypt as he himself commented when he was first preparing to leave. While in Cairo he partnered with his dear friend Douglas M. Thornton in order to reach educated Muslims with the gospel of Jesus Christ. This dynamic duo held many lectures in their home, Beit Arabi Pasha, and wrote a weekly magazine titled Orient and Occident. After Thornton’s death in 1907 Gairdner continued his work in Cairo but was never able to recapture the amount of work that was accomplished when Thornton was at his side. It was this lack of help that would plague his ministry until the day of his death in 1928. Gairdner was a prolific writer and scholar of Arabic.

Wikipedia [weblink mine]

This collection of letters and informal writing was provided for digitisation by Redcliffe College. This volume is in the public domain.

W.H. Temple Gairdner [1873-1928], W.H.T.G. to His Friends. Some letters and informal writings of Canon W.H.Temple Gairdner of Cairo 1873-1928. London: SPCK, 1930. Hbk. pp.173. [Click to visit the download page]

Contents

  • Preface
  1. The Near East
  2. Hee Sees the World
  3. At the Sea
  4. Christmas and Easter Festivals
  5. Letters to Children
  6. Portraits
  7. He Sends his Thanks
  8. He Shares the Lives of his Friends
  9. Reflexions on some Deeper Things
  10. Arts and Artists
  11. Hellas
  12. On Books nd Authors
  13. On the Writings of H. G. Wells
  14. On Elgar’s Second Symphony

Preface

This little book has been compiled at the suggestion of many friends who wished to have a lasting share in what has been called my husband’s “greatest legacy” -that is, his letters and informal papers. And indeed this thought of sharing is a keynote of the book, just as it was also of the life of Temple Gairdner-one who was ever eager both to enter into the lives of others and to share with them his own. Writing was to him no labour; it was inevitable, easier often than speech. “Read what I have written,” he would say, when asked to describe some incident.

But it is to the circumstances of his life-his residence as a missionary abroad, with the inevitable long and frequent separations from kith and kin-that we owe the mass of his correspondence. There were letters on purely personal subjects, giving sympathy with friends in joy or sorrow, or vividly describing some latest happening in his own circle….

For more resources on W.H.T. Gairdner, click here

Samuel M. Zwemer’s, The Moslem World

Samuel M. Zwemer [1867-1952], The Moslem World.Samuel M. Zwemer wrote this volume as a textbook for mission classes in colleges and universities. His purpose was “…to present Islam as a challenge to the faith and enterprise of the Church…. Each chapter was intended as a study by itself on the Mohammedan religion in its different aspects, and the needs and opportunities of the Mohammedan world from the standpoint of Christian missions.” [p.xii]. As such, it remains to great value to this day.

My thanks to the Cambridge Centre for Christianity Worldwide for making a copy of this public domain title available for digitisation.

Samuel M. Zwemer [1867-1952], The Moslem World. New York: Young People’s Missionary Movement, 1908. Hbk. pp.239. [Click to visit the download page]

Contents

  • Preface
  1. The Great Arabian Prophet
  2. Spread of His Religion
  3. What the Moslems Believe and Practise
  4. A General View of the Moslem World
  5. Social and Moral Evils of Islam
  6. The Story of Missions to Moslems
  7. The Present Problem and Peril
  8. The Day of Opportunity
  • Appendixes
  • A. Chronological Table of Important Events in the History of Islam and of Missions to Moslems
  • B. List of Missionary Societies
  • C. Selected List of Books on the Moslem World
  • Index

Chapter 1. The Great Arabian Prophet

About the year 570 A. D., Abdullah, the son of Abdul Muttalib, a Mecca merchant, went on a trading trip from Mecca to Medina, and died there. A few months after his death his wife, Amina, gave birth to a boy, who was named Mohammed. One hundred years later the name of this Arab, joined to that of the Almighty, was called out in ten thousand minarets five times daily from the Persian Gulf to the Atlantic, and his new religion was sweeping everything before it in three continents. Who was this hero-prophet, what was his environment, and what the secret of his genius? What is the explanation of this marvel of history? Many theories have been given, and the true explanation of the spread of Islam is probably the sum of all these theories: the weakness of the Oriental Churches; their corrupt state; the condition of the Roman and Persian empires.…

Robert Morrison, Pioneer of Missions to China

William John Townsend [1835-1915], Robert Morrison, The Pioneer of Chinese MissionsRobert Morrison (1782-1834) was a Presbyterian missionary to China. He is notable for his translation and subsequent widespread distribution of a Chinese Bible and for his Chinese Dictionary. He is often called the “Father of Anglo-Chinese Literature”. My thanks to Redcliffe College for providing a copy of this book for digitisation. This title is in the public domain.

William John Townsend [1835-1915], Robert Morrison, The Pioneer of Chinese Missions. London: Pickering & Inglis, [n.d.]. Hbk. pp.184. [Click to visit the download page]

Contents

  • Preface
  1. Introductory
  2. Childhood and Youth
  3. Preparation For the Great Work
  4. Initial Life and Work in China
  5. Persecution – Dr. Milne
  6. Visit To Peking – Malacca College
  7. Bible Completed – Death of Milne
  8. Work in England – Return To China
  9. Renewed Labour – Closing Scenes
  10. What He Was – What He Did

Chapter 1: Introductory

“O rock, rock, when wilt thou open? ” exclaimed the apostolic Xavier, as he lay burning with fever on an island off the coast of China in 1552. Similar ardent longings have stirred the souls of consecrated Christian workers during many periods of the Church’s history. But China remained a sealed rock to Christian effort until about the middle of the last century. No one can be surprised that it has attracted to itself a variety of interest, and especially that it should enkindle the enthusiasm of the Christian missionary. The tenacious life which has prolonged itself for upwards of four thousand years, and has survived the tempests of time-which have carried down into utter destruction the great empires of antiquity, Egypt, Assyria, Babylon, Persia, Greece, and Rome-stamps the Chinese as a peculiar people, and invests them with a halo of romance well calculated to fire the imagination of the adventurous spirit….

By My Spirit by Jonathan Goforth

Jonathan Goforth [1859-1936] and his wife Rosalind [1864-1942] were Canadian Presbyterian Missionaries who were encouraged to serve in China by the writings of Hudson Taylor. Jonathan was wounded with a sword during the Boxer Uprising and the couple returned briefly to Canada on furlough in 1900.

After their return to Henan in 1901, Jonathan Goforth felt increasingly restless. In 1904 and 1905 he was inspired by news of the great Welsh revival and read Charles Finney’s “Lectures on Revivals”. In 1907, circumstances brought him to witness firsthand the stirring Korean revival (“When the Spirit’s Fire Swept Korea” [1943] represents his response). As Goforth returned to China through Manchuria, congregations invited him back in early 1908. During this extended visit there the “Manchurian revival” broke out. It was the first such revival to gain nationwide publicity in China as well as international repute. The revival transformed Goforth’s life and ministry; from then on he was primarily an evangelist and revivalist, not a settled missionary. He also became one of the best known of all China missionaries, admired by many, but criticized by some for “emotionalism.” [Wikipedia]

As the Wikipedia article notes: “Jonathan Goforth became the foremost missionary revivalist in early 20th-century China and helped to establish revivalism as a major element in Protestant China missions.” This book sets out to explain his thinking on the subject.

Jonathan Goforth [1859-1936], By My Spirit. London & Edinburgh: Marshall, Morgan & Scott, [1929]. Hbk. pp.189. [Click to visit the downlaod page].

This title is in the public domain. My thanks to Redcliffe College for providing a copy for digitisation.

Contents

  • Preface
  1. Introductory
  2. A Season of Intensive Preparation
  3. The Beginning of fhe Movement in Manchuria
  4. Further Triumphs of the Spirit in Manchuria
  5. Repentance and Confession in Shansi
  6. An Outpouring of Divine Blessing Upon Chantehfu
  7. The Lord’s Presence and Power in the Chantehfu Out-Stations
  8. Evil Spirits Defeated and Cast Out in Honan
  9. Hindrances Swept Away When the Spirit Worked in Chihli
  10. Further Evidences of the Spirit’s Mighty Work in Chihli
  11. God’s Dealings With Young People in Shantung
  12. How Revival Came to the Schools in Kiangsu
  13. Indispensable Factors in Revival

The Wikipedia article linked above is excellent, but lacks direct links to the books I have available by the Goforth’s listed here. I am not allowed to add them, but perhaps someone else could.