Rusty Hinges. A Story of Closed Doors Opening in North-East Tibet

Frontispiece: Frank Doggett Learner [1886-1947], Rusty Hinges. A Story of Closed Doors Beginning to Open in North-East Tibet. A photograph of the author in Tibetan Dress

Frank Doggett Learner writes of his 22 years of service with the China Inland Mission in Tibet, noting indications of progress that have been made. My thanks to Redcliffe College for making a copy of this public domain title available for digitisation.

Contents

Frank Doggett Learner [1886-1947], Rusty Hinges. A Story of Closed Doors Beginning to Open in North-East Tibet. London: The China Inland Mission, 1934. Hbk. pp.157. [Click to visit the download page for this title]

  • By Way of Introduction
  1. “The Western City of Peace”
  2. A General View of the Land
  3. The People of Tibet
  4. Religious Conditions
  5. Incarnate Buddhas
  6. The Lamasery of Ten Thousand Images
  7. Two Kumbum Festivals
  8. A Visit to Koko-Nor
  9. Among the Nomads
  10. The Door is Opening
  11. Firstfruits

By Way of Introduction

It has been my desire in recent times, strengthened by the request of many friends, to record some of the knowledge acquired and experiences passed through during the twenty years’ service for His Kingdom which. God has permitted me to render on the borders of Tibet.

Feeling very much my inadequacy, I venture on the task relying wholly upon God for guidance and ability, my one aim being to help create a keener missionary interest in the mysterious land of Tibet.

At the time of writing, I am sitting outside our tent on an August day at a little place among the Tibetan hills called Shang-hsin-chuang, where my wife and I have come for a few days’ rest and retreat. A panorama of beautiful country is stretched out before me, the old border wall dividing Tibet from China but a few hundred yards away.

As my eyes rest on the snow-capped mountain range, from 13,000 to 15,000 feet high, I cannot but think of the millions of Tibetans on the other side who have never heard of Jesus Christ….

Page vii

In China Now. China’s Need and the Christian Contribution

John Charles Keyte [1875-1942], In China Now. China's Need and the Christian Contribution

Written as a manual for missionaries arriving to begin work in China, it has sections intended for those serving as evangelists, teachers and those in the medical professions. Numerous editions were published: for the Baptist Missionary Society; China Inland Mission; Church of England Zenana Missionary Society; Church Missionary Society; Christian Endeavour Union; London Missiionary Society; Primitive Methodist Christian Endeavour Society; Society for the Propagation of the Gospel; Student Christian Movement, Wesleyan Methodist Missionary Society; Youth Committee of the United Free Church of Scotland, and the United Council for Missionary Education. This is the London Missionary Society edition.

My thanks to the Cambridge Centre for Christianity Worldwide for providing a copy of this public domain title for digitisation.

John Charles Keyte [1875-1942], In China Now. China’s Need and the Christian Contribution. London: The Livingstone Press, 1923. Pbk. pp.160. [Click to visit the download page for this title]

Contents

  • Editorial Note
  • Author’s Preface
  1. The Old-World Outlook
  2. The New Framework (Part I)
  3. The New Framework (Part II)
  4. The Work of the Evangelist
  5. The Work of the Teacher
  6. The Work of the Healer
  7. “The Home of all Good Men”
  • Appendix A
  • Appendix B
  • Bibliography
  • Index

Chapter 1: The Old-World Outlook

In order to gain any idea of the task which confronts the Church of Christ in China, it is necessary to have some conception of the Chinese world in which that work has to be done, and of the outlook to-day of the Chinese themselves. The few pictures which follow, unrelated at first sight though they may be, are an attempt to indicate this.

One bright morning in August 1913 two Englishmen, the writer and an old friend, were travelling down the upper reaches of the great Yangtze-kiang in a small native boat used for carrying postal mails. They had been fired upon early that morning by brigands; but by dint of keeping the boat well in the middle of the broad stream and rowing vigorously, the crew, seven men in all, had got past the danger. At eleven o’clock however another shot rang out, and an examination of the river showed that they were in a narrow stretch easily com-manded from the banks. The crew rowed on pluckily until two boats carrying armed brigands put out further down the river. in order to cut them off.

Page 9

Pearls of the Pacific: Samoa and Other Islands of the South Seas

Victor Arthur Barradale [1874-1947], Pearls of the Pacific. Being Sketches of Missionary Life and Work in Samoa and other Islands in the South Seas

Victor Arnold Barradale wrote two books that drew on his three years of missionary service in Samoa. Both had very similar titles. This is the earlier and more heavily illustrated of the two. My thanks to Redcliffe College for making a copy of this public domain title available for digitisation.

Victor Arthur Barradale [1874-1947], Pearls of the Pacific. Being Sketches of Missionary Life and Work in Samoa and other Islands in the South Seas. London: London Missionary Society, 1907. Hbk. pp.192. [Click to the Victor Barradale page where you will find the download links to his books]

Contents

  • Preface
  1. Samoa and Other Pearls
  2. The First Missionary Ships
  3. More Missionary Ships
  4. Samoa: As it Was
  5. Hoisting the Flag
  6. People, Houses and Food
  7. Play
  8. Climate, Clothing, Animals and Insects
  9. Seasons and Souls
  10. Trades and Employments
  11. Samoa: As it is—Home Life and Industries
  12. School Life
  13. The Malua Institution
  14. Churches
  15. Sunday Schools
  16. The Foreign Mission Work of the South Seas Churches
  17. More Foreign Missionary Work

Robert and Louisa Stewart in Life and Death

Mary E. Watson, Robert and Louisa Watson. In Life and Death

Robert and Louisa Stewart were both born in ireland and served with the Church Missionary Society in China, where they died in the Kucheng Massacre of 1895. This book was written by Louisa’s sister and is the standard biography of the couple.

My thanks to Redcliffe College for making this public domain title available for digitisation.

Mary E. Watson, Robert and Louisa Watson. In Life and Death. London: Marshall Brothers, 1895. Hbk. pp.243. [This title is in the public domain]

Contents

  • Preface
  1. Some Reminiscences of Robert Stewart
  2. Ambassadors For Christ
  3. The Whirlwind
  4. The Joyful Sound
  5. Native Boys and Girls at School
  6. Christ Magnified
  7. “Possessions”
  8. Hands Clasped
  9. Strong Consolation
  10. “Called, and Chosen, and Faithful

Chapter 2

Various proposals have been made as to writing a Life of Robert and Louisa Stewart ; but they have all been declined.

Lives so truly lived in secret with God are not easy to record. And even if the attempt were successfully made, is there not a danger of exalting the human and losing sight of the fact that “all things are of God?”

It has been thought, therefore, that it is sufficient for God’s glory, to print some letters lately received, and supply a few details of the earlier times. Their letters were not kept, at Mr. Stewart’s earnest request.

Feeling that anything too personal would have been repugnant to the feelings of our dear brother and sister, we refrain from writing their biographies; but we know their wish would be that we should write and print anything that would awaken love and sympathy for China and the Chinese-anything that would show the friends who have helped through prayer and by their gifts that the need now is not less, but greater….

Pages 17-18.

Leprosy Mission in India, Japan & China

John Jackson [1853-1917], In Leper-Land. A Record of 7,000 Miles among Indian Lepers, with a Glimpse of Hawaii, Japan, and China

This is John Jackson’s record of his 7,000 mile tour (in about 1900) through India, China and Japan on behalf of the Mission to Lepers, now The Leprosy Mission.

My thanks to Redcliffe College for providing a copy of this public domain book for digitisation.

John Jackson [1853-1917], In Leper-Land. A Record of 7,000 Miles among Indian Lepers, with a Glimpse of Hawaii, Japan, and China. London: The Mission to Lepers, [1914]. Hbk. pp.208. [Click here to visit The Leprosy Mission page for the download link for this book and related titles]

Contents

  1. Bombay
  2. Pui and Poladur
  3. Nasik
  4. Wardha and Raipur
  5. Chandkuri
  6. Mungeli
  7. Purulia
  8. Purulia (continued)
  9. Asansol
  10. Raniganj and Bhangalpur
  11. Calcutta
  12. The Cry of the Children
  13. An Indian Snowstorm
  14. Almora
  15. Almora to Chandag
  16. Chandag Heights—The Place
  17. Chandag Heights—The Worker
  18. Chandag Heights—The Work
  19. Moradabad, Rurki, and Dehra Dun
  20. Saharanpur, Ludhiana, ad Ambala
  21. Tarn Taran
  22. Ramachandrapuram
  23. Sholapur, Poona, and Miraj
  24. A World Tour

Chapter 1

This volume is the record of a Tour extending to 7,000 miles of Indian travel and occupying a period of twenty weeks, exclusive of the voyages out and home. My primary purpose was to ascertain by personal observation the real condition of the lepers of India, and to obtain a direct insight into the work of ministering to their physical and spiritual needs. It was fitting, therefore, that my first visit to any place of public interest should be to the ” Homeless Leper Asylum,” as it is officially termed, at Matunga, Bombay. The drive of five miles through the city presented to my unfamiliar gaze more features of interest than one pair of eyes could apprehend. While trying to seize the points of a group full of life and colour on the right, figures and scenes of beauty or squalor, but picturesque in either case, were escaping me on the left….

page 15

1890 Deputation Visit to North China by Rev T.M. Morris

Cover: T.M. Morris [1830-1904], A Winter in North China with an Introduction by the Rev. Richard Glover of Bristol.

This is an account of a deputation tour of Baptist Missionary Society stations in Northern China by the Rev. T.M. Morris and Rev. Richard Glover.

My thanks to Redcliffe College for providing a copy of this public domain title for digitisation.

T.M. Morris [1830-1904], A Winter in North China with an Introduction by the Rev. Richard Glover of Bristol. London: The Religious Tract Society, 1892. Hbk. pp.256. [Click to visit the download page for this title]

Contents

  • Introduction
  • Author’s Preface
  1. From San Francisco to Yokohama
  2. Chefoo and Tien-Tsin
  3. From Tien-Tsin to Tsing-Chow-Fu
  4. Tsing-Chow-Fu
  5. Chow-Ping
  6. Chi-Nan-Fu
  7. The Great Plain of China
  8. T’ai-Yuen-Fu
  9. Peking
  10. An Interview with Li-Hung-Chang
  11. Shanghai
  12. Hankow, Hong-Kong, and Canton
  13. The Religions of China
  14. Fung-Shui
  15. Missionary Works and Methods in China

Author’s Preface

The question of sending out a deputation to China had long been considered by the committee of the Baptist Missionary Society, and our missionaries in China had been long asking that a deputation should be sent. ‘Our work,’ they said, ‘has been criticized by those who have never seen it, and who have known little or nothing of the circumstances in which and the conditions under which that work is being carried on. Our work has never been described but by ourselves, and there are many who think, and some who say, that we are not the fittest people to estimate the value of our own work. Send out, then, two men in whom you have confidence, and in whom we shall have confidence. Let them visit our stations and see our work with their own eyes, and on their return give a faithful, unbiassed report of what they have seen and heard. With that report, whatever may be its character, we shall be satisfied, and we trust you will be satisfied.’

The request was felt to be reasonable, but it was one which could not be easily complied with. In 1890, however, the committee felt that a deputation ought to be sent: out without further delay, and Dr. Glover and myself were asked to undertake the work. For myself, I may say that I never entered upon any work with more hesitation and reluctance; but there is now scarcely any part of my life upon which I look back with feelings of greater satisfaction. I am thankful, and ever shall be thankful, that I have been permitted to see something of that great work which God is carrying on in China.

Our instructions were to visit our own missionary stations in the two provinces of Shantung and Shansi, and report upon the work done. Further, we were to see all that could be seen of the work of other societies in those parts of China which we might visit. During our brief stay in that great empire we had the opportunity of inspecting the work of many missionary societies, and we were constantly moved to thank God for what we saw. We had read about missions in China, we had heard about them, and we were not disappointed when we were brought face to face with them; for extent, character, and worth they far exceeded our largest expectations; and so far from feeling that we had been deluded by exaggerated, extravagant, or garbled statements, we felt, as we passed from one mission station to another, that ‘ the half had not been told.’ Again and again have we said to missionary brethren as they have quietly unfolded to us the extent and results of the work in which they were engaged, ‘Why have you not told us this at home? It has all the charm of a romance.’

Pages 11-12

Zenana Bible and Medical Missions in India

Cover: Ella Mary Weatherley [1870-1921], From West to East. Being the Story of a Recent Visit to Indian Missions

Ella Mary Weatherley was the Honorary Secretary of the Zenana Bible and Medical Mission (ZBMM) (which today has become Interserve). In around 1909 she undertook a tour of ZBMM station across India and this book is the substance of her report.

My thanks to Redcliffe College for providing a copy of this public domain title for digitisation.

Ella Mary Weatherley [1870-1921], From West to East. Being the Story of a Recent Visit to Indian Missions. London: Zenana Bible and Medical Mission, [1910]. Hbk. pp.128. [Click to visit the download page for this title]

Contents

  • Introduction
  1. Port Said
  2. Bombay
  3. Nasik
  4. Manmad
  5. Agra
  6. Cawnpore
  7. Lucknow
  8. Khurja and Bulandshahr
  9. Dehli
  10. Lamore and Kasur
  11. Benares
  12. Gorakhpur
  13. Allahabad
  14. Sultanpur
  15. Jaunpur
  16. Patna
  17. Valtoha
  18. Patti
  19. Parantij—Bombay
  20. Panchgani anbd Sholapur

Introduction by the Right Rev E.G. Ingram, D.D. [1851-1926]

I have lately been travelling over much of the ground covered by Miss Weatherley, and it is a pleasure to write a few words by way of calling attention to the sort of information she is now in a position to afford to those who are willing to know the facts about our thin Missionary fighting line.

First of all let me say that I am a great believer in the value of the impression a visitor is in a position to convey. Again and again during my Far Eastern journeys Missionaries have said, “It would never have occurred to us to put that down.” And they admitted that probably their very familiarity with the scenes in the midst of which they live has made them a little absent-minded as to the sort of facts the workers in the homeland want most to hear about. So true it is that “lookers on see most of the game!”

Then again I am anxious to say again and again that it is necessary for the Home base and the front to be intelligently and sympathetically linked together. Though doubted whether the Mission wants the casual visitor, there can be no doubt that anyone who comes from the Home Committee with a desire to give to fellow-workers the right hand of fellowship, and to get to understand their problems at first hand, will receive a warm welcome and will do much good.

Such a visit as that described in the following pages will be a distinct asset. Everything Miss Weatherley reads or hears will come to her now with a new intelligence, and the word in season will come easy both in Conference and in Committee.

The stages are constantly changing. The sort of work and worker needed yesterday may not be wanted to-morrow. The emergence of an indigenous Christianity means greater changes still. The Missionaries will do better work in proportion as they realize they have an intelligent and co-operative base behind them.

Women’s Missionary Work in India and China

Cover: Glimpses of Women's Missionary Work in India and China.

Written shortly after the Jubilee of the Baptist Missionary Society (1867-1917), this book aims to provide a series of snapshots of the work done by female Baptist missionaries. It is illustrated by six photographic plates from India and China.

My thanks to Redcliffe College for providing a copy of this public domain title for digitisation.

George Hawker [1857-1932], Open the Window Eastward. Glimpses of Women’s Missionary Work in India and China. London: The Carey Press, [1917]. Hbk. pp.170. [Click to visit the download page for this title]

  • Preface
  1. Pioneers
  2. Zenana Echoes
  3. Zenana Schools
  4. Women’s Influence
  5. Village Itineration
  6. Boat-Tours in the Beels
  7. “Going-a-Plaguing”
  8. Famine Relief Work
  9. “Doctor Sahiba”
  10. An Industrial Settlement (Salamatpur)
  11. Education: Dehli, Entally and Ballygunge
  12. India: Review and Outlook
  13. Country Work in Shantung
  14. Bessie Campbell and Her Biographer
  15. Certain Women and their Stories
  16. In the Days of the Second Revolution
  17. The New Opportunity

Chapter 2: Zenana Echoes

When our missionary sisters entered the grudgingly opened doors of the zenanas, they were constrained, more markedly in some districts than in others, to make haste slowly. In a speech delivered in London in 1881, when the Mission was just fourteen years old, the Rev. R. F. Guyton described the evolution of zenana work proper in the city of Delhi, the scene of his own memorable labours. At first our sisters could attempt little more than the establishing of friendly relations by means of conversation on general topics. Later they were able to give lessons in reading, writing and secular subjects. Then they taught lace-work and other, feminine employments, which provided new interests and relieved the monotony of seclusion; and finally, when confidence had been secured and minds opened, they were able to introduce the Scriptures and urge the claims of Christ.

Mr. Guyton was of opinion that this policy of patience was entirely justified, and that more precipitate evangelism would have resulted in exclusion. Since that time zenana doors have been opening ever more swiftly and widely, and if the missionary staff were immensely increased, the members of it and their native assistants would find more than enough to do of actual gospel work.

In reading this address of Mr. Guyton’s, and relating it to other records, one is driven to reflect upon the appalling amount of inane and trivial talk which must have afflicted our women missionaries, taxing their patience to the point of exhaustion, in those early days, and, indeed, all the way along. Of course small talk is not peculiar to any race or to either sex, and if the conversation of the world were stenographed for a single day, and the, volume of it appraised by some commissioned angel of adequate endurance, it is gravely doubtful whether the talk of women would be adjudged to be vainer or more wearisome than that of men. That men think lightly of women’s matters is irrelevant. The angel critic, superior to masculine limitations and unbiased by masculine conceit, would weigh with equal scales….

Pages19-20.

Church of England Zenana Missions in India and Sri Lanka

A.D., Until the Shadows Flee Away. The Story of the C.E.Z.M.S. in India and Ceylon

The zenana missions were outreach programmes established in British India with the aim of converting women to Christianity. From the mid 19th century, they sent female missionaries into the homes of Indian women, including the private areas that male visitors were not allowed to see (zenana). Gradually these missions expanded from purely evangelical work to providing medical and education services. Hospitals and schools established by these missions are still active, making the zenana missions an important part of the history of Christianity in India.

“Zenana Missions”, Wikipedia

My thanks to the Cambridge Centre for Christianity Worldwide for making this public domain book available for digitisation.

A.D., Until the Shadows Flee Away. The Story of the C.E.Z.M.S. in India and Ceylon. London: Church of England Zenana Missionary Society, n.d. Hbk. pp.247. [Click to visit the download page for this title]

Contents

Part 1: Outlines and Impressions

  1. India and its Peoples
  2. India Past and Present
  3. Religions of India
  4. Condition of India and its Women
  5. India’s Women at the Crossing of the Way
  6. Folk-lore
  7. “Little Kings”
  8. The Church of England Zenana Missionary Society

Part 2: The Story of Work Amongst the Women of India and Ceylon

  1. The Border-Lnd and Over
  2. Through the Sindh to the Sea
  3. The Land of the Five Rivers
  4. The Plain of the Ganges
  5. The Central Provinces
  6. In the Telugu Country
  7. Madras and the Plateau of Mysore
  8. The Blue Mountains and the Lords of the Hills
  9. The Sacred Hedge
  10. The Land of the Conch Shell
  11. The Shining Land
  • Afterword—As the Stars
  • Appendices

Kingdom Without Borders A Missionary Survey

Thomas Moscrop [1860-1920], The Kingdom Without Frontiers. A Missionary Survey

An introduction to Christians Missions written on behalf of the Wesleyan Missionary Society. My thanks to the Cambridge Centre for Christianity Worldwide for providing a copy of this public domain title for digitisation.

Thomas Moscrop [1860-1920], The Kingdom Without Frontiers. A Missionary Survey. London: Robert Culley, 1910. Hbk. pp.288. [Click to visit the download page for this title]

Contents

  • Preface
  1. The General Progress of the Enterprise
  2. The World-Outllook: The Present Position
  3. Special Signs of Success
  4. World-wide Social Results
  5. The Claiming of the Future
  6. Criticism and Testimony
  7. The Return-value of Missions
  8. Postponed and Neglected Enterprises
  9. Present Perils and Urgencies
  10. Special and Created Obligations
  11. Primary Motives and Obligations
  12. The Universal Epic

Preface

The purpose of this volume is to give such a statement of the facts of the foreign missionary enterprise, and such a survey of its operations, as will encourage those who support it to give themselves with greater zeal to ‘the furtherance of the gospel amongst non-Christian peoples. The writer, in the course of missionary advocacy, has been asked repeatedly-by enthusiastic supporters, by earnest seekers for knowledge, and by coldly critical people-to answer questions, the answers to which involved just such information as is here given; and he is assured by others having a similar experience that there is much in this work that is likely to meet the needs of those who want to know the facts.

The literature of Missions is now immense, and it is growing rapidly-this is, in itself, a proof of the growth of the enterprise-and it is obvious that much must be left out in a general work like this; but it is hoped that compression of facts will not have destroyed their living interest….

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