These Seventy Years: Autobiography of Thomas Lewis

Picture of Thomas Lewis [1859-1929]
Thomas Lewis [1859-1929]

Thomas Lewis served with the Baptist Missionary Society (BMS) in Africa in the areas known today as Cameroon, Angola and the Democratic Republic of Congo.

My thanks to Book Aid for making a copy of this pulic domain book available for digitisation.

Thomas Lewis [1859-1929], These Seventy Years. An Autobiography. London: The Carey Press, 1930. Hbk. pp.300. [Click to visit the download page for this title]

Contents

  • Preface
  1. Early Years
  2. At College
  3. Before the Candidate Committee
  4. Sailing For Africa
  5. Along the West African Coast
  6. Vixtoria and its Peoples
  7. My First Christmas in Africa
  8. Germany Annexes Cameroons
  9. Lasts Days in Cameroons
  10. My First Furlough
  11. First Voyage up the Congo River
  12. San Salvador and the First Baptisms
  13. Mostly Concerning Colleagues
  14. The King’s Golden Necklace
  15. Developments of the Native Church
  16. Building a Mission Station
  17. Pioneering in Zomboland
  18. Moving the Tent
  19. Travels from Kibokolo
  20. Difficulties and Setbacks
  21. A Critical Period
  22. Further Travels
  23. Changes
  24. Kimpese and the Valley of the Shadow
  25. Unsettled Days and the Return to Kimpese
  26. A Fresh Start at Kibokolo
  27. “The Stones of Kibokolo”
  28. Reflections
  29. Nkand’a Nzambi—Book of God
  30. Final Words
  • Index

W. Holman Bentley, Congo Pioneer

Hendrina Margo Bentley [1855-1938], W. Holman Bentley: The Life and Labours of a Congo Pioneer.

An important biography on the noted Baptist Missionary Society pioneer in the Congo W. Holman Bentley, written by his widow. My thanks to Redcliffe College for making a copy of this public domain title available for digitisation.

Hendrina Margo Bentley [1855-1938], W. Holman Bentley: The Life and Labours of a Congo Pioneer. London: The Carey Press, 1907. pp.446. [Click to visit the download page for this title]

Contents

  • Preface
  1. Early Life and Home Influences
  2. The Voyage Out
  3. The San Salvador
  4. Early Days
  5. To Stanley Pool
  6. Manyanga
  7. ‘In Journeys Oft’
  8. ‘A People in Darkness’
  9. Arthington at Last
  10. First Furlough, and Many Labours
  11. To the Field Once More
  12. Up the River
  13. Settles at Wathen
  14. The Man and His Methods
  15. Mission Policy and Personal Dealings
  16. Itinerating: Privlieges and Perils
  17. Progress, Encouragement, and Trials
  18. Third Period in the Congo
  19. Last Days and Home-Call
  20. Recollections and Testimonies
  • Appendix
  • Index

John Thomas, First Baptist Missionary to Bengal

John Thomas (1757-1801)
Photo credit: Regent’s Park College, University of Oxford

Dr John Thomas [1757-1801] was a founding member of the Baptist Missionary Society and accompanied William Carey to India in 1793. Charles Bennett Lewis’s biography is one of the standard works on Thomas. The original from which this digital copy was made is held in Spurgeon’s College Library. This book is in the public domain.

Charles Bennett Lewis [1821-1890], The Life of John Thomas. Surgeon of the Earl of Oxford and First Baptist Missionary to Bengal. London: MacMillan & Co., 1873. Hbk. pp.417. [Click to visit the download page for this title]

Contents

  • Preface
  1. Mr Thomas’s Early Life—1757-83
  2. Calcutta in the Latter half of the Eighteenth Century
  3. Voyages to Calcutta and engagement as a Missionary—1783-87
  4. The First Year at Malda—1787-8
  5. Controversy and Disaster—1788-89
  6. Harla Gachi—1789-90
  7. Reconciliation and Return to England—1790-92
  8. Missionary Projects in Bengal
  9. The Baptist Missionary Society and its First Enterprise
  10. How the Lord made Room for His Servants, that they might dwell in the Land—1793-4
  11. Moypaldiggy—1794-7
  12. Having no certain dwelling-place—1797-9
  13. Serampore—1799-1800
  14. Cast down, but not destroyed—1799-1800
  15. Dinajpur and Sadamahal—1801
  16. Concluding Observations
  • Appendix

Pioneering in the Congo by William Holman Bentley

William Holman Bentley [1855-1905], Pioneering on the Congo, 2 Vols.

William Holman Bentley was one of the first missionaries to serve with the Baptist Missionary Society in the Congo. He worked on a Dictionary and Grammar of the Kongo Language (published in 1887, butstill in use today) and translated the New Testament and portions of the New Testament. My thanks to the Cambridge Centre for Christianity Worldwide for making a set of these copiously illustrated public domain books available for digitisation. The number of pictures explains the larger than usual size of the files.

William Holman Bentley [1855-1905], Pioneering on the Congo, 2 Vols. London: The Religious Tract Society, 1900. Hbk. pp.478+448. [Click to visit the download page for this title]

Contents – Volume 1

  • Preface
  1. Ancient History: 1484-1670
  2. The Old Slaving Days: 1670-1877
  3. The Inception of the Mission: 1877-8
  4. Congo-wards: 1879
  5. The Establistment of the Mission: 1879
  6. Developments at San Salvador and Explorations Therefore: 1879-80
  7. The Congo Basin and its Inhabitants; The Kongo Language
  8. Religion: The Knowledge of God, and Fetishism
  9. The Opposition Outflanked; Stanley Pool reached: 1881
  10. Development of the New Route to the Upper River: 1881-2

Contents – Volume 2

  1. The Transport of the Peace to Stanley Pool: 1883
  2. Exploration of the Upper River: 1884-6
  3. New Stations on the Upper River: 1886-90
  4. Progress on the Upper River: 1890-9
  5. Development in the Cataract Region: 1887-99
  6. Other Missions on the Congo
  7. The Government of the Congo Free State

Appendices

  • Congo Missionaries
  • The Lord’s Prayer in Eight of the Kongo Languages and Dialects
  • Malarial Fever, its Genesis and Effect
  • Index

Rusty Hinges. A Story of Closed Doors Opening in North-East Tibet

Frontispiece: Frank Doggett Learner [1886-1947], Rusty Hinges. A Story of Closed Doors Beginning to Open in North-East Tibet. A photograph of the author in Tibetan Dress

Frank Doggett Learner writes of his 22 years of service with the China Inland Mission in Tibet, noting indications of progress that have been made. My thanks to Redcliffe College for making a copy of this public domain title available for digitisation.

Contents

Frank Doggett Learner [1886-1947], Rusty Hinges. A Story of Closed Doors Beginning to Open in North-East Tibet. London: The China Inland Mission, 1934. Hbk. pp.157. [Click to visit the download page for this title]

  • By Way of Introduction
  1. “The Western City of Peace”
  2. A General View of the Land
  3. The People of Tibet
  4. Religious Conditions
  5. Incarnate Buddhas
  6. The Lamasery of Ten Thousand Images
  7. Two Kumbum Festivals
  8. A Visit to Koko-Nor
  9. Among the Nomads
  10. The Door is Opening
  11. Firstfruits

By Way of Introduction

It has been my desire in recent times, strengthened by the request of many friends, to record some of the knowledge acquired and experiences passed through during the twenty years’ service for His Kingdom which. God has permitted me to render on the borders of Tibet.

Feeling very much my inadequacy, I venture on the task relying wholly upon God for guidance and ability, my one aim being to help create a keener missionary interest in the mysterious land of Tibet.

At the time of writing, I am sitting outside our tent on an August day at a little place among the Tibetan hills called Shang-hsin-chuang, where my wife and I have come for a few days’ rest and retreat. A panorama of beautiful country is stretched out before me, the old border wall dividing Tibet from China but a few hundred yards away.

As my eyes rest on the snow-capped mountain range, from 13,000 to 15,000 feet high, I cannot but think of the millions of Tibetans on the other side who have never heard of Jesus Christ….

Page vii

In China Now. China’s Need and the Christian Contribution

John Charles Keyte [1875-1942], In China Now. China's Need and the Christian Contribution

Written as a manual for missionaries arriving to begin work in China, it has sections intended for those serving as evangelists, teachers and those in the medical professions. Numerous editions were published: for the Baptist Missionary Society; China Inland Mission; Church of England Zenana Missionary Society; Church Missionary Society; Christian Endeavour Union; London Missiionary Society; Primitive Methodist Christian Endeavour Society; Society for the Propagation of the Gospel; Student Christian Movement, Wesleyan Methodist Missionary Society; Youth Committee of the United Free Church of Scotland, and the United Council for Missionary Education. This is the London Missionary Society edition.

My thanks to the Cambridge Centre for Christianity Worldwide for providing a copy of this public domain title for digitisation.

John Charles Keyte [1875-1942], In China Now. China’s Need and the Christian Contribution. London: The Livingstone Press, 1923. Pbk. pp.160. [Click to visit the download page for this title]

Contents

  • Editorial Note
  • Author’s Preface
  1. The Old-World Outlook
  2. The New Framework (Part I)
  3. The New Framework (Part II)
  4. The Work of the Evangelist
  5. The Work of the Teacher
  6. The Work of the Healer
  7. “The Home of all Good Men”
  • Appendix A
  • Appendix B
  • Bibliography
  • Index

Chapter 1: The Old-World Outlook

In order to gain any idea of the task which confronts the Church of Christ in China, it is necessary to have some conception of the Chinese world in which that work has to be done, and of the outlook to-day of the Chinese themselves. The few pictures which follow, unrelated at first sight though they may be, are an attempt to indicate this.

One bright morning in August 1913 two Englishmen, the writer and an old friend, were travelling down the upper reaches of the great Yangtze-kiang in a small native boat used for carrying postal mails. They had been fired upon early that morning by brigands; but by dint of keeping the boat well in the middle of the broad stream and rowing vigorously, the crew, seven men in all, had got past the danger. At eleven o’clock however another shot rang out, and an examination of the river showed that they were in a narrow stretch easily com-manded from the banks. The crew rowed on pluckily until two boats carrying armed brigands put out further down the river. in order to cut them off.

Page 9

Pearls of the Pacific: Samoa and Other Islands of the South Seas

Victor Arthur Barradale [1874-1947], Pearls of the Pacific. Being Sketches of Missionary Life and Work in Samoa and other Islands in the South Seas

Victor Arnold Barradale wrote two books that drew on his three years of missionary service in Samoa. Both had very similar titles. This is the earlier and more heavily illustrated of the two. My thanks to Redcliffe College for making a copy of this public domain title available for digitisation.

Victor Arthur Barradale [1874-1947], Pearls of the Pacific. Being Sketches of Missionary Life and Work in Samoa and other Islands in the South Seas. London: London Missionary Society, 1907. Hbk. pp.192. [Click to the Victor Barradale page where you will find the download links to his books]

Contents

  • Preface
  1. Samoa and Other Pearls
  2. The First Missionary Ships
  3. More Missionary Ships
  4. Samoa: As it Was
  5. Hoisting the Flag
  6. People, Houses and Food
  7. Play
  8. Climate, Clothing, Animals and Insects
  9. Seasons and Souls
  10. Trades and Employments
  11. Samoa: As it is—Home Life and Industries
  12. School Life
  13. The Malua Institution
  14. Churches
  15. Sunday Schools
  16. The Foreign Mission Work of the South Seas Churches
  17. More Foreign Missionary Work

Robert and Louisa Stewart in Life and Death

Mary E. Watson, Robert and Louisa Watson. In Life and Death

Robert and Louisa Stewart were both born in ireland and served with the Church Missionary Society in China, where they died in the Kucheng Massacre of 1895. This book was written by Louisa’s sister and is the standard biography of the couple.

My thanks to Redcliffe College for making this public domain title available for digitisation.

Mary E. Watson, Robert and Louisa Watson. In Life and Death. London: Marshall Brothers, 1895. Hbk. pp.243. [This title is in the public domain]

Contents

  • Preface
  1. Some Reminiscences of Robert Stewart
  2. Ambassadors For Christ
  3. The Whirlwind
  4. The Joyful Sound
  5. Native Boys and Girls at School
  6. Christ Magnified
  7. “Possessions”
  8. Hands Clasped
  9. Strong Consolation
  10. “Called, and Chosen, and Faithful

Chapter 2

Various proposals have been made as to writing a Life of Robert and Louisa Stewart ; but they have all been declined.

Lives so truly lived in secret with God are not easy to record. And even if the attempt were successfully made, is there not a danger of exalting the human and losing sight of the fact that “all things are of God?”

It has been thought, therefore, that it is sufficient for God’s glory, to print some letters lately received, and supply a few details of the earlier times. Their letters were not kept, at Mr. Stewart’s earnest request.

Feeling that anything too personal would have been repugnant to the feelings of our dear brother and sister, we refrain from writing their biographies; but we know their wish would be that we should write and print anything that would awaken love and sympathy for China and the Chinese-anything that would show the friends who have helped through prayer and by their gifts that the need now is not less, but greater….

Pages 17-18.

Leprosy Mission in India, Japan & China

John Jackson [1853-1917], In Leper-Land. A Record of 7,000 Miles among Indian Lepers, with a Glimpse of Hawaii, Japan, and China

This is John Jackson’s record of his 7,000 mile tour (in about 1900) through India, China and Japan on behalf of the Mission to Lepers, now The Leprosy Mission.

My thanks to Redcliffe College for providing a copy of this public domain book for digitisation.

John Jackson [1853-1917], In Leper-Land. A Record of 7,000 Miles among Indian Lepers, with a Glimpse of Hawaii, Japan, and China. London: The Mission to Lepers, [1914]. Hbk. pp.208. [Click here to visit The Leprosy Mission page for the download link for this book and related titles]

Contents

  1. Bombay
  2. Pui and Poladur
  3. Nasik
  4. Wardha and Raipur
  5. Chandkuri
  6. Mungeli
  7. Purulia
  8. Purulia (continued)
  9. Asansol
  10. Raniganj and Bhangalpur
  11. Calcutta
  12. The Cry of the Children
  13. An Indian Snowstorm
  14. Almora
  15. Almora to Chandag
  16. Chandag Heights—The Place
  17. Chandag Heights—The Worker
  18. Chandag Heights—The Work
  19. Moradabad, Rurki, and Dehra Dun
  20. Saharanpur, Ludhiana, ad Ambala
  21. Tarn Taran
  22. Ramachandrapuram
  23. Sholapur, Poona, and Miraj
  24. A World Tour

Chapter 1

This volume is the record of a Tour extending to 7,000 miles of Indian travel and occupying a period of twenty weeks, exclusive of the voyages out and home. My primary purpose was to ascertain by personal observation the real condition of the lepers of India, and to obtain a direct insight into the work of ministering to their physical and spiritual needs. It was fitting, therefore, that my first visit to any place of public interest should be to the ” Homeless Leper Asylum,” as it is officially termed, at Matunga, Bombay. The drive of five miles through the city presented to my unfamiliar gaze more features of interest than one pair of eyes could apprehend. While trying to seize the points of a group full of life and colour on the right, figures and scenes of beauty or squalor, but picturesque in either case, were escaping me on the left….

page 15

1890 Deputation Visit to North China by Rev T.M. Morris

Cover: T.M. Morris [1830-1904], A Winter in North China with an Introduction by the Rev. Richard Glover of Bristol.

This is an account of a deputation tour of Baptist Missionary Society stations in Northern China by the Rev. T.M. Morris and Rev. Richard Glover.

My thanks to Redcliffe College for providing a copy of this public domain title for digitisation.

T.M. Morris [1830-1904], A Winter in North China with an Introduction by the Rev. Richard Glover of Bristol. London: The Religious Tract Society, 1892. Hbk. pp.256. [Click to visit the download page for this title]

Contents

  • Introduction
  • Author’s Preface
  1. From San Francisco to Yokohama
  2. Chefoo and Tien-Tsin
  3. From Tien-Tsin to Tsing-Chow-Fu
  4. Tsing-Chow-Fu
  5. Chow-Ping
  6. Chi-Nan-Fu
  7. The Great Plain of China
  8. T’ai-Yuen-Fu
  9. Peking
  10. An Interview with Li-Hung-Chang
  11. Shanghai
  12. Hankow, Hong-Kong, and Canton
  13. The Religions of China
  14. Fung-Shui
  15. Missionary Works and Methods in China

Author’s Preface

The question of sending out a deputation to China had long been considered by the committee of the Baptist Missionary Society, and our missionaries in China had been long asking that a deputation should be sent. ‘Our work,’ they said, ‘has been criticized by those who have never seen it, and who have known little or nothing of the circumstances in which and the conditions under which that work is being carried on. Our work has never been described but by ourselves, and there are many who think, and some who say, that we are not the fittest people to estimate the value of our own work. Send out, then, two men in whom you have confidence, and in whom we shall have confidence. Let them visit our stations and see our work with their own eyes, and on their return give a faithful, unbiassed report of what they have seen and heard. With that report, whatever may be its character, we shall be satisfied, and we trust you will be satisfied.’

The request was felt to be reasonable, but it was one which could not be easily complied with. In 1890, however, the committee felt that a deputation ought to be sent: out without further delay, and Dr. Glover and myself were asked to undertake the work. For myself, I may say that I never entered upon any work with more hesitation and reluctance; but there is now scarcely any part of my life upon which I look back with feelings of greater satisfaction. I am thankful, and ever shall be thankful, that I have been permitted to see something of that great work which God is carrying on in China.

Our instructions were to visit our own missionary stations in the two provinces of Shantung and Shansi, and report upon the work done. Further, we were to see all that could be seen of the work of other societies in those parts of China which we might visit. During our brief stay in that great empire we had the opportunity of inspecting the work of many missionary societies, and we were constantly moved to thank God for what we saw. We had read about missions in China, we had heard about them, and we were not disappointed when we were brought face to face with them; for extent, character, and worth they far exceeded our largest expectations; and so far from feeling that we had been deluded by exaggerated, extravagant, or garbled statements, we felt, as we passed from one mission station to another, that ‘ the half had not been told.’ Again and again have we said to missionary brethren as they have quietly unfolded to us the extent and results of the work in which they were engaged, ‘Why have you not told us this at home? It has all the charm of a romance.’

Pages 11-12