Leprosy Mission in India, Japan & China

John Jackson [1853-1917], In Leper-Land. A Record of 7,000 Miles among Indian Lepers, with a Glimpse of Hawaii, Japan, and China

This is John Jackson’s record of his 7,000 mile tour (in about 1900) through India, China and Japan on behalf of the Mission to Lepers, now The Leprosy Mission.

My thanks to Redcliffe College for providing a copy of this public domain book for digitisation.

John Jackson [1853-1917], In Leper-Land. A Record of 7,000 Miles among Indian Lepers, with a Glimpse of Hawaii, Japan, and China. London: The Mission to Lepers, [1914]. Hbk. pp.208. [Click here to visit The Leprosy Mission page for the download link for this book and related titles]

Contents

  1. Bombay
  2. Pui and Poladur
  3. Nasik
  4. Wardha and Raipur
  5. Chandkuri
  6. Mungeli
  7. Purulia
  8. Purulia (continued)
  9. Asansol
  10. Raniganj and Bhangalpur
  11. Calcutta
  12. The Cry of the Children
  13. An Indian Snowstorm
  14. Almora
  15. Almora to Chandag
  16. Chandag Heights—The Place
  17. Chandag Heights—The Worker
  18. Chandag Heights—The Work
  19. Moradabad, Rurki, and Dehra Dun
  20. Saharanpur, Ludhiana, ad Ambala
  21. Tarn Taran
  22. Ramachandrapuram
  23. Sholapur, Poona, and Miraj
  24. A World Tour

Chapter 1

This volume is the record of a Tour extending to 7,000 miles of Indian travel and occupying a period of twenty weeks, exclusive of the voyages out and home. My primary purpose was to ascertain by personal observation the real condition of the lepers of India, and to obtain a direct insight into the work of ministering to their physical and spiritual needs. It was fitting, therefore, that my first visit to any place of public interest should be to the ” Homeless Leper Asylum,” as it is officially termed, at Matunga, Bombay. The drive of five miles through the city presented to my unfamiliar gaze more features of interest than one pair of eyes could apprehend. While trying to seize the points of a group full of life and colour on the right, figures and scenes of beauty or squalor, but picturesque in either case, were escaping me on the left….

page 15

Mary Reed, Missionary to the Lepers

Mary ReedMary Reed [1854-1943] was an American missionary to India. Diagnosed with leprosy herself in 1891, she took this to be God’s guidance that she should work among the lepers of Chandag where she served for 52 years. Below are links to two titles on Mary Reed, both written within her lifetime. The first I am assuming to be still in copyright to The Leprosy Mission who are happy for my to make it available on-line. It may be used for free educational purposes, but not sold for profit without permission from the copyright holder. The second title is in the public domain. My thanks to Redcliffe College for providing copies of these books for digitisation.

E. Mackerchar, Mary Reed of Chandag, 5th edn. London: The Mission to Lepers, n.d. Pbk. pp.32. [Click to visit the download page]

John Jackson [1853-1917], Mary Reed: Missionary to the Lepers, 9th revd. & enlarged edn., 1908. London: Marshall Brothers, 1899. Hbk. pp.133. [Click to visit the download page]

Contents

  • Extract from Miss Reed’s Letter
  • Preface to the New and Enlarged Edition (the Ninth)
  • Introductory Words by Rev. F.B. Meyer
  1. Early Life
  2. Discovery and Decision
  3. The Way of the Cross
  4. Appointed to Chandag
  5. Among the Lepers
  6. Trials and Triumphs – 1894
  7. Praise and Progress – 1895
  8. A Welcome Visitor – 1895
  9. Travail of Soul – 1896
  10. Year by Year
  11. Christmas With the Lepers
  12. A Vision of the Night
  13. Divided Duties – 1897
  14. Light and Shade – 1898
  15. The Prayer of Faith – 1899

Appendix – Bringing the Narrative up to August, 1908.

Mending and Making: The Work of the Leprosy Mission

W.H.P. & M. Anderson, Mending and MakingThis profusely illustrated little book sets out to explain the work of the Mission to Lepers, now The Leprosy Mission. This work is reproduced by permission of the The Leprosy Mission. This book may be used for free educational purposes, but not reprinted for profit without permission from the copyright holder.

W.H.P. & M. Anderson, Mending and Making. London: The Mission to Lepers, n.d. Pbk. pp.63. [Click to visit the download page]

Contents

  • Foreword
  • Reading to Perish
  • A “City” of Compassion
  • Settling their own affairs
  • Must I Become like These?
  • When Mercy Smiles
  • Out of their Poverty
  • The Doctor Babu and his Patients
  • Giving them a Chance
  • The Gift of “Perfect Soundness”

Foreword

It is startling to many people to learn that there are great numbers of lepers in the world. There are more lepers probably in Asia than any other continent, but Africa and South America are sorely affected. Leprosy is also prevalent in the numerous islands of the Pacific Ocean, and few, if any, countries of the world are quite free of it. The disease finds most favourable conditions for spreading among people of low standards of living, because of their poverty and their ignorance of even the simplest laws of health.

Vigorous measures against leprosy have been possible in the Hawaiian and Philip-pine Islands, and if no new cases should be imported the prospect of those islands becoming free of leprosy is hopeful. No country, however, especially in these days of freedom of movement of people from one land to another, is free from the menace of the disease, particularly those countries most easy of access from the seriously infected parts of Asia. In lands like our own, where higher standards of living obtain, with strictly enforced health laws, the danger of leprosy gaining a foothold is negligible….

Story of the Mission to Lepers 1874-1917 by A. Donald Miller

A. Donald Miller, An Inn Called Welcome. The Story of the Mission to Lepers 1874-1917“This book tells the story of forty-three years of compassionate service to leprosy sufferers. It begins in a drawing room in a Dublin suburb, and ends in places as far apart as India, China and Korea. Although the book covers only the years 1874-1917, it is published during the ninetieth anniversary year of The Mission to Lepers and, at a later date, it is hoped to continue the story from the end of the First World War to the middle of the twentieth century.”

“Mr. A. Donald Miller’s service to those who suffer from leprosy began in 1922 when he was posted by The Mission to Lepers to its largest Home, at Purulia, in West Bengal, India. In 1924 he became the Mission’s Secretary for India, organising and developing the work in that country where the Mission began its activities and where it still has its largest Field. From 1943 until 1960 he was General Secretary of The Mission to Lepers and, on his retirement, became Consultant from 1960 to 1963 when he was made a Vice-President of the Society. His work has taken him to many countries where the Mission and its co-operating societies work in the field of leprosy care and control. He is eminently fitted, by experience and ability, to write the story of the Mission. His other books include A Bridge of Compassion and Music at Midnight.”

From the dustjacket

This book is in copyright and is reproduced here by kind permission of The Leprosy Mission. You are permitted to download and print this book for free educational purposes. It may not be sold for profit without written permission from the copyright holder.

A. Donald Miller, An Inn Called Welcome. The Story of the Mission to Lepers 1874-1917. London: The Mission to Lepers, 1965. Hbk. pp.241. [Click to visit the download page]

Contents

  • Introduction
  • Part One: 1874-1899
  • Part Two: 1900-1909
  • Part Three: 1910-1917
  • Index

Sixty Years of Ministry to Lepers

Anonymous, Sixty Years of Service 1874-1934 on Behalf of Lepers and Their ChildrenThe Mission to Lepers – later known as The Leprosy Mission – was founded by Wellesley C Bailey. This book, published three years before Bailey’s death at the age of 91 – to which he contributed the foreword – recounts the mission’s history. My thanks to Redcliffe College for providing me with a copy of this book to scan. This title is in the Public Domain.

Anonymous, Sixty Years of Service 1874-1934 on Behalf of Lepers and Their Children. London: The Mission to Lepers, 1934. Hbk. pp.96. [Click to download complete book in PDF]

Contents

  • A Message from the Founder
  • Small Beginnings
  • Growth and Expansion (1874-1924)
  • Ten Year Onward (1924-1934)
  • Lengthening the Stakes – China
  • Breaking Forth – Africa
  • The Children Sat in a New Place
  • The Church Among the Lepers
  • Progress in Treatment for Leprosy, 1934-1934
  • America Contribution
  • Fields and Stations
  • The Missions Support
  • Co-operating Societies and Churches
  • Honorary Officers, Council, Secretaries, &c.

A Message from the Founder

It is to me a source of great thankfulness that I have lived to see the Diamond Jubilee of our beloved Mission and to take a part m the rejoicings, though I fear I shall not be able to be present at any of the special meetings to celebrate the event. Naturally, I look back, and my heart goes up in thankfulness and praise to God for His wonderful dealings with the Mission through all these sixty years. He has provided for its needs, never permitting us to close a year with a deficit. He has provided the workers for the various ministries that have been carried on, the ministry of comfort and help, the ministry of teaching and healing, and of saving the children from falling victims to the disease of their parents, and the giving of an outlook and. interest in life to those who had given up hope in anything. [Continue reading]