Sketches from the Karen Hills – Alonzo Bunker

Alonzo Bunker [1837-1912], Sketches from the Karen HillsAlonzo Bunker served for forty years among the Karen people of Burma (modern Myanmar) for the American Baptist Missionary Union. In this book he shares from his wealth of experience. My thanks to Redcliffe College for providing a copy of this book to digitise. This title is in the public domain.

Alonzo Bunker [1837-1912], Sketches from the Karen Hills. New York: Fleming H. Revell Company, 1910. Hbk. pp.215. [Click to download complete book in PDF]

Contents

  1. Exploration of Loikaw Mission
  2. Exploration Continued
  3. Founding Loikaw Mission
  4. The First Christmas in Loikaw Mission
  5. Stories of Karen Child-Life
  6. K’surdo
  7. Encounter with Wild Beasts and Serpents
  8. Story of the Yahdo Chapel
  9. Thirteen Witches
  10. Perils and Pleasures
  11. The Miracle of Senite
  12. Provindential Care
  13. The Magic Doughnut
  14. A Notable Missionary Journey
  15. The Gospel and the Savage Bercs
  16. How We Captured the Myaangyoung Pongyi

Introduction

Every person who is interested in the triumphs of the gospel, and in the often thrilling experiences of the men who, in obedience to a Divine call, are giving their lives to make it known to the unenlightened and barbarous peoples of the East, will welcome this small volume of missionary sketches from the pen of Rev. Dr. Alonzo Bunker, who for forty years has been an honoured and successful representative in Burma of the American Baptist Missionary Union. This new volume will be especially welcome to those who have read with delight and profit “Soo Thah,” a book by the same author, published a few years since, and for which there is still a large demand by the reading public.

Dr. Bunker has been emphatically a pioneer missionary. The work to which he was assigned necessitated long and difficult journeys over vast mountainous regions, infested by wild beasts and untraversed by the feet of white men, to reach tribes of men grossly ignorant, and hardly less wild than their untamed neighbours of the forest. [Continue reading]