Schwartz of Tanjore by Jesse Page

Jesse Page, Schwartz of Tanjore.

Christian Friedrich Schwartz was a German Lutheran missionary who served in India for 48 years. I have tried to find the date of death for the author of this biography, Jesse Page. Finding no record of his birth or death I contacted the only one of his publishers still in existence and they agreed with my conclusion that the name was pseudonymous. As he, whoever he was, was almost certainly dead before 1948, judging by the date of his first book I am assuming that his works are in the public domain. If anyone can throw any further light on this, do get in touch with me. My thanks to the Cambridge Centre for Christianity Worldwide for making this book available for digitisation.

Jesse Page, Schwartz of Tanjore. London: SPCK, 1921. Hbk. pp.203. [Click to visit the Christian Friedrich Schwartz page for the download link for this title]

Contents

  • Preface
  1. How Christianity Came to India
  2. the Friar and the Lutheran
  3. From College to Mission Field
  4. In Touch with the Brahmins
  5. Amid War’s Alarms
  6. A Glimpse of the Man Himself
  7. Wayside Work
  8. In First Touch with Tanjore
  9. As Peacemaker with Hyder Ali
  10. The Strain Begins to Tell
  11. Tuljajee and Serfogee
  12. Responsilities and Patience
  13. A Noble Defence on Missions
  14. The Shadows Lengthen
  15. The Home Going
  16. The Memory of the Just
  • Index

Preface

There is one reason; amongst others, why the memory of Christian Frederick Schwartz deserves to be kept green in the history of missions. It is not generally known that the consuming passion for the conversion of the heathen which burned in the soul of Henry Martyn was kindled at the torch of this veteran witness for the faith. While still a student at Cambridge, Martyn was profoundly impressed by reading his journal and letters, and when he himself arrived in India, ten years after the death of Schwartz, he took counsel with many who, like Dr. Kerr, could stir his heart with first-hand stories of the venerable missionary they had known and loved so well. Happily for us, these records which moved Martyn so deeply are still preserved, fresh and vivid, a veritable classic in missionary literature.
The age of Schwartz, from a missionary point of view, has scarcely received adequate attention at the hand of the historian…

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