George Smith’s 1887 Biography of William Carey

This is George Smith’s biography of the Father of Modern Missions, William Carey. Smith devotes a significant part of the book to enumerating Carey’s achievements, as a linguist, a Bible translator, as a pioneer in agriculture and horticulture (which I was not aware of before), as an educator and advocate of missions.

My thanks to Redcliffe College for providing a copy of this book for digitisation. This title is in the public domain.

George Smith [1833-1919], The Life of William Carey, D.D. Shoemaker and Missionary, 2nd ednGeorge Smith [1833-1919], The Life of William Carey, D.D. Shoemaker and Missionary, 2nd edn. London: John Murray, 1887. Hbk. pp.389. [Click to download complete book in PDF]

Contents

Preface

Preface to Second Edition

  1. Carey’s College
  2. The Birth of England’s Foreign Missions
  3. India as Catrey Found It
  4. Six Years in North Bengal – Missionary and Indigo Planter
  5. The New Crusade – Serampore and the Brotherhood
  6. The First Native Converts and Christian Schools
  7. Calcutta and the Mission Centres From Dehli to Amboyna
  8. Carey’s Family and Friends
  9. Professor of Sanskrit, Bengali and Marathi
  10. The Wiclif of the East – Bible Translation
  11. What Carey Did For Literature and For Humanity
  12. What Carey Did For Science – Founder of the Agricultural and Horticultural Society of India
  13. Carey’s Immediate Influence in Great Britain amd America
  14. Carey as an Educator – The First Christian College in the East
  15. Carey’s Last Days

Index

Preface

On the death of William Carey in 1834 Dr. Joshua Marsh-man promised to write the Life of his great colleague, with whom he had held almost daily converse since the beginning of the century, but he survived too short a time to begin the work. As a writer of culture, in full sympathy and frequent correspondence with Carey, the Rev. Christopher Anderson, of Edinburgh, was even better fitted for the task. In 1836 the Rev. Eustace Carey anticipated him by issuing what is little better than a selection of mutilated letters and journals made at the request of the Committee of the Baptist Missionary Society. It contains one passage of value, however. [Continue reading]