Rusty Hinges. A Story of Closed Doors Opening in North-East Tibet

Frontispiece: Frank Doggett Learner [1886-1947], Rusty Hinges. A Story of Closed Doors Beginning to Open in North-East Tibet. A photograph of the author in Tibetan Dress

Frank Doggett Learner writes of his 22 years of service with the China Inland Mission in Tibet, noting indications of progress that have been made. My thanks to Redcliffe College for making a copy of this public domain title available for digitisation.

Contents

Frank Doggett Learner [1886-1947], Rusty Hinges. A Story of Closed Doors Beginning to Open in North-East Tibet. London: The China Inland Mission, 1934. Hbk. pp.157. [Click to visit the download page for this title]

  • By Way of Introduction
  1. “The Western City of Peace”
  2. A General View of the Land
  3. The People of Tibet
  4. Religious Conditions
  5. Incarnate Buddhas
  6. The Lamasery of Ten Thousand Images
  7. Two Kumbum Festivals
  8. A Visit to Koko-Nor
  9. Among the Nomads
  10. The Door is Opening
  11. Firstfruits

By Way of Introduction

It has been my desire in recent times, strengthened by the request of many friends, to record some of the knowledge acquired and experiences passed through during the twenty years’ service for His Kingdom which. God has permitted me to render on the borders of Tibet.

Feeling very much my inadequacy, I venture on the task relying wholly upon God for guidance and ability, my one aim being to help create a keener missionary interest in the mysterious land of Tibet.

At the time of writing, I am sitting outside our tent on an August day at a little place among the Tibetan hills called Shang-hsin-chuang, where my wife and I have come for a few days’ rest and retreat. A panorama of beautiful country is stretched out before me, the old border wall dividing Tibet from China but a few hundred yards away.

As my eyes rest on the snow-capped mountain range, from 13,000 to 15,000 feet high, I cannot but think of the millions of Tibetans on the other side who have never heard of Jesus Christ….

Page vii

In China Now. China’s Need and the Christian Contribution

John Charles Keyte [1875-1942], In China Now. China's Need and the Christian Contribution

Written as a manual for missionaries arriving to begin work in China, it has sections intended for those serving as evangelists, teachers and those in the medical professions. Numerous editions were published: for the Baptist Missionary Society; China Inland Mission; Church of England Zenana Missionary Society; Church Missionary Society; Christian Endeavour Union; London Missiionary Society; Primitive Methodist Christian Endeavour Society; Society for the Propagation of the Gospel; Student Christian Movement, Wesleyan Methodist Missionary Society; Youth Committee of the United Free Church of Scotland, and the United Council for Missionary Education. This is the London Missionary Society edition.

My thanks to the Cambridge Centre for Christianity Worldwide for providing a copy of this public domain title for digitisation.

John Charles Keyte [1875-1942], In China Now. China’s Need and the Christian Contribution. London: The Livingstone Press, 1923. Pbk. pp.160. [Click to visit the download page for this title]

Contents

  • Editorial Note
  • Author’s Preface
  1. The Old-World Outlook
  2. The New Framework (Part I)
  3. The New Framework (Part II)
  4. The Work of the Evangelist
  5. The Work of the Teacher
  6. The Work of the Healer
  7. “The Home of all Good Men”
  • Appendix A
  • Appendix B
  • Bibliography
  • Index

Chapter 1: The Old-World Outlook

In order to gain any idea of the task which confronts the Church of Christ in China, it is necessary to have some conception of the Chinese world in which that work has to be done, and of the outlook to-day of the Chinese themselves. The few pictures which follow, unrelated at first sight though they may be, are an attempt to indicate this.

One bright morning in August 1913 two Englishmen, the writer and an old friend, were travelling down the upper reaches of the great Yangtze-kiang in a small native boat used for carrying postal mails. They had been fired upon early that morning by brigands; but by dint of keeping the boat well in the middle of the broad stream and rowing vigorously, the crew, seven men in all, had got past the danger. At eleven o’clock however another shot rang out, and an examination of the river showed that they were in a narrow stretch easily com-manded from the banks. The crew rowed on pluckily until two boats carrying armed brigands put out further down the river. in order to cut them off.

Page 9

Robert Morrison – A Master Builder by Marshall Broomhall

Marshall Broomhall [1866-1937], Robert Morrison, A Master Builder

A biography of the Presbyterian Missionary to Macao, Bible translator and Lexicographer Robert Morrison by the Editorial Secretary of the China Inland Mission. My thanks to Redcliffe College for providing a copy of this public domain title for digitisation.

Marshall Broomhall [1866-1937], Robert Morrison, A Master Builder. London: China Inland Mission, 1924. Hbk. pp.238. [Click to visit the Robert Morrison page for the download link for this title and others]

Contents

  • Author’s Preface
  • Table of Dates
  1. The Great Closed Land
  2. A Great Tribulation and a Little Child
  3. The Hidden Man of the Heart
  4. High Employ
  5. The Call of China
  6. The Voyage
  7. Old Canyon
  8. Facing Life’s Task
  9. Some Momentous Decisions
  10. Overlapping Extraordinary
  11. A Colleague at Last
  12. The Ultra-Ganges Mission
  13. Dismissed but Indispensible
  14. Lonely and in Constant Apprehension
  15. An Iona in the East
  16. Translating the Scriptures
  17. Sorrow Upon Sorrow
  18. An International Impasse
  19. The Great Fire
  20. After Fifteen Years
  21. Two Years in England
  22. In Stress and Storm
  23. All Manner of Service
  24. Missionary Reinforcement
  25. A Painful Parting
  26. Faithful unto Death
  27. Unfading Glory
  28. Epilogue
  29. Appendices
  30. Index

Author’s Preface

“The pioneer is forgotten” wrote Robert Morrison in a fit of depression. To him in his lonely post it seemed so, but the statement is not true for all time. The pioneer, like the prophet, may be despised or even slain by his contemporaries, but posterity will build his tomb. In Morrison’s case he lived to be honoured beyond most missionaries, and time has only added lustre to his name.

It is fitting that his life and work should be again recalled, for a new and promising chapter in the evangelization of China has commenced. The Christian Church which Morrison set forth to found in the land of Sinim has lately claimed the right to administer her own affairs where able to do so. The great gulf between a land with no followers of Christ – we speak of the Protestant Church alone – and a land with a Church strong enough to desire self-government, has, thank God, been bridged. On the one side of that great span stands Morrison, the dauntless master-builder, and on the other side the first National Christian Conference which met at Shanghai less than two years ago.

Page ix

Robert and Louisa Stewart in Life and Death

Mary E. Watson, Robert and Louisa Watson. In Life and Death

Robert and Louisa Stewart were both born in ireland and served with the Church Missionary Society in China, where they died in the Kucheng Massacre of 1895. This book was written by Louisa’s sister and is the standard biography of the couple.

My thanks to Redcliffe College for making this public domain title available for digitisation.

Mary E. Watson, Robert and Louisa Watson. In Life and Death. London: Marshall Brothers, 1895. Hbk. pp.243. [This title is in the public domain]

Contents

  • Preface
  1. Some Reminiscences of Robert Stewart
  2. Ambassadors For Christ
  3. The Whirlwind
  4. The Joyful Sound
  5. Native Boys and Girls at School
  6. Christ Magnified
  7. “Possessions”
  8. Hands Clasped
  9. Strong Consolation
  10. “Called, and Chosen, and Faithful

Chapter 2

Various proposals have been made as to writing a Life of Robert and Louisa Stewart ; but they have all been declined.

Lives so truly lived in secret with God are not easy to record. And even if the attempt were successfully made, is there not a danger of exalting the human and losing sight of the fact that “all things are of God?”

It has been thought, therefore, that it is sufficient for God’s glory, to print some letters lately received, and supply a few details of the earlier times. Their letters were not kept, at Mr. Stewart’s earnest request.

Feeling that anything too personal would have been repugnant to the feelings of our dear brother and sister, we refrain from writing their biographies; but we know their wish would be that we should write and print anything that would awaken love and sympathy for China and the Chinese-anything that would show the friends who have helped through prayer and by their gifts that the need now is not less, but greater….

Pages 17-18.

Leprosy Mission in India, Japan & China

John Jackson [1853-1917], In Leper-Land. A Record of 7,000 Miles among Indian Lepers, with a Glimpse of Hawaii, Japan, and China

This is John Jackson’s record of his 7,000 mile tour (in about 1900) through India, China and Japan on behalf of the Mission to Lepers, now The Leprosy Mission.

My thanks to Redcliffe College for providing a copy of this public domain book for digitisation.

John Jackson [1853-1917], In Leper-Land. A Record of 7,000 Miles among Indian Lepers, with a Glimpse of Hawaii, Japan, and China. London: The Mission to Lepers, [1914]. Hbk. pp.208. [Click here to visit The Leprosy Mission page for the download link for this book and related titles]

Contents

  1. Bombay
  2. Pui and Poladur
  3. Nasik
  4. Wardha and Raipur
  5. Chandkuri
  6. Mungeli
  7. Purulia
  8. Purulia (continued)
  9. Asansol
  10. Raniganj and Bhangalpur
  11. Calcutta
  12. The Cry of the Children
  13. An Indian Snowstorm
  14. Almora
  15. Almora to Chandag
  16. Chandag Heights—The Place
  17. Chandag Heights—The Worker
  18. Chandag Heights—The Work
  19. Moradabad, Rurki, and Dehra Dun
  20. Saharanpur, Ludhiana, ad Ambala
  21. Tarn Taran
  22. Ramachandrapuram
  23. Sholapur, Poona, and Miraj
  24. A World Tour

Chapter 1

This volume is the record of a Tour extending to 7,000 miles of Indian travel and occupying a period of twenty weeks, exclusive of the voyages out and home. My primary purpose was to ascertain by personal observation the real condition of the lepers of India, and to obtain a direct insight into the work of ministering to their physical and spiritual needs. It was fitting, therefore, that my first visit to any place of public interest should be to the ” Homeless Leper Asylum,” as it is officially termed, at Matunga, Bombay. The drive of five miles through the city presented to my unfamiliar gaze more features of interest than one pair of eyes could apprehend. While trying to seize the points of a group full of life and colour on the right, figures and scenes of beauty or squalor, but picturesque in either case, were escaping me on the left….

page 15

Pearls From the Pacific by Florence Young

Florence Young
Florence Young [Frontispiece]

Florence Young [1856-1940] was born in New Zealand the daughter of Plymouth Brethren émigrés from England. She was sent back to England for her education and, following the death of her parents, she moved to Queensland, Australia. Deeply influenced by her Brethren upbringing, and by the teaching of the Keswick Convention, she began a work among the Melanesians in Queensland and later in the Solomon Islands. She was the founder of the Queensland Kanaka Mission (QKM), which became the South Sea Evangelical Mission (SSEM).

My thanks to Redcliffe College for making a copy of this public domain title available for digitisation.

Florence Selina Harriet Young [1856-1940], Pearls from the Pacific. London & Edinburgh: Marshall Brothers, 1925. Hbk. pp.256. [Click here to visit the Florence Young page for the download link for this title and other material about this remarkable lady]

Contents

  • Foreword
  1. Birth, 1856-1859, N.Z.
    Parentage
    Return To New Zealand, 1860-1865, N.Z.
    My Mother
    Invercargill and Victoria, 1866-1871, Vic.
    School in England, 1871-1874, Eng.
  2. From Darkness to Light, 1874, N.Z. 
    Sydney, England, and Continent, 1878-1881, Eng.
  3. Fairymead, 1882-1886,  Q’ld.
    Queensland Kanaka Mission, 1886-1887 Q’ld.
    England and India, 1888-1889, Eng. & India
  4. Call to China, 1890-1891, China
    Testing, 1891, China
    Yang-Chau and Kao-Iu, 1891-1892, China
    Gain After Loss, 1892, China
  5. Inland China, 1892, China
    Kuei-K’I, 1892, China
    Shang-Ts’ing, 1893, China
    Letters, 1893, China
    Ho’k’eo, 1893-1894, China
    Another Change, 1893-1894, China
    Ien-Shan, 1894, China
    Conflict, 1894,  China
  6. Return to Australia, 1894-1895, Aus, N.Z.
    “Not In Vain”, 1896, Q’ld.
    Back to China, An-Ren, 1897, China
    House Building, 1898-1899, China
    Boxer Outbreak, 1900, China
    England and Switzerland, 1901-1902, Eng., Switz.
  7. Progress in Queensland, 1899-1900, Q’ld.
    Further Testimonies, 1901-1903, Q’ld.
    North Queensland, 19012-1902, Q’ld.
  8. The Regions Beyond, 1900-1904, Sol. Islands
    Solomon Islands, 1904, Sol. Islands
    First Journey to Malaita, 1904, Sol. Islands
    Initiatory Difficulties, 1904, Sol. Islands
  9. The Spirit of Prayer in Queensland, 1905, 
    Second Journey to Malaita, 1905, Sol. Islands
    Revival in Queensland, 1906, Q’ld.
    The Year of Jubilee, 1906, Q’ld.
    Retrospect of Work in Queensland, 1882-1906, Q’ld.
  10. “Come Over and Help Us”, 1907, Sol. Islands
    Guadalcanar and Makira, 1908, Sol. Islands
    “Is Anything Too Hard For the Lord”, 1909, Sol. Islands
    Call Upon Me in the Day of Trouble”, 1909, Sol. Islands
    Sinorango, 1909, Sol. Islands
    “A Little Child Shall Lead Them”, 1909, Sol. Islands
    “Nobody Come Along You-Me”, 1909, Sol. Islands
    “The Terror By Night”, 1910, Sol. Islands
    “Behold I and the Children Which God Hath Given Me”, 1910, Sol. Islands
    “Rennell” Island, 1910, Sol. Islands
  11. The Martyr’s Crown, 1911, Sol. Islands
    England and Palestine, 1912-1913, Eng., Pales.
    “Do It With Thy Might”, 1913,  Sol. Islands
    “What I Do Thou Knowest Not Now”, 1913, Sol. Islands
    “Some Believed”, 1913, Sol. Islands 
    “She Loved Much”, 1913, Sol. Islands 
    The Lame Take the Prey”, 1913, Sol. Islands
    The Enduement of Power, 1914, Sol. Islands 
    Fellow Workers, Sol. Islands 
    “The Valley of the Shadow”, Sol. Islands
  12. The Ship and the School, Sol. Islands 
    Our Library, Sol. Islands 
    Baptisms, Sol. Islands 
    Sydney Office, Sydney 
    “Make Us All Intense For Thee”, 1924, Sol. Islands

Foreword

The following pages form a thrilling account of God’s work in the far off Islands of the South Seas, written by one whose own record of service is honourable and enviable. She tells the story of God’s grace with characteristic modesty and clear intention of ascribing all the glory of that which she recounts to Him. Christians in Great Britain know all too little of the work of the Kingdom in the more remote fields such as this one, of which these chapters tell. And thus to be brought face to face with the claim and challenge of such a story as is here unfolded cannot fail to bring the blessing of enlargement of heart and sympathy to every reader. For no privilege is more enriching than that of sympathetic and prayerful fellowship with those who are spending their treasure of life in Christ’s service on the furthermost frontier. Very heartily do I commend the perusal of what my friend, Miss Young, has written to the generous response and appreciation of the people of God in every land. They will surely read it with pleasure and profit; and rise with, I trust, newly strengthened desire to share to the utmost in all that the Lord of the Harvest is doing through His surrendered servants.

J Stuart Holden

1890 Deputation Visit to North China by Rev T.M. Morris

Cover: T.M. Morris [1830-1904], A Winter in North China with an Introduction by the Rev. Richard Glover of Bristol.

This is an account of a deputation tour of Baptist Missionary Society stations in Northern China by the Rev. T.M. Morris and Rev. Richard Glover.

My thanks to Redcliffe College for providing a copy of this public domain title for digitisation.

T.M. Morris [1830-1904], A Winter in North China with an Introduction by the Rev. Richard Glover of Bristol. London: The Religious Tract Society, 1892. Hbk. pp.256. [Click to visit the download page for this title]

Contents

  • Introduction
  • Author’s Preface
  1. From San Francisco to Yokohama
  2. Chefoo and Tien-Tsin
  3. From Tien-Tsin to Tsing-Chow-Fu
  4. Tsing-Chow-Fu
  5. Chow-Ping
  6. Chi-Nan-Fu
  7. The Great Plain of China
  8. T’ai-Yuen-Fu
  9. Peking
  10. An Interview with Li-Hung-Chang
  11. Shanghai
  12. Hankow, Hong-Kong, and Canton
  13. The Religions of China
  14. Fung-Shui
  15. Missionary Works and Methods in China

Author’s Preface

The question of sending out a deputation to China had long been considered by the committee of the Baptist Missionary Society, and our missionaries in China had been long asking that a deputation should be sent. ‘Our work,’ they said, ‘has been criticized by those who have never seen it, and who have known little or nothing of the circumstances in which and the conditions under which that work is being carried on. Our work has never been described but by ourselves, and there are many who think, and some who say, that we are not the fittest people to estimate the value of our own work. Send out, then, two men in whom you have confidence, and in whom we shall have confidence. Let them visit our stations and see our work with their own eyes, and on their return give a faithful, unbiassed report of what they have seen and heard. With that report, whatever may be its character, we shall be satisfied, and we trust you will be satisfied.’

The request was felt to be reasonable, but it was one which could not be easily complied with. In 1890, however, the committee felt that a deputation ought to be sent: out without further delay, and Dr. Glover and myself were asked to undertake the work. For myself, I may say that I never entered upon any work with more hesitation and reluctance; but there is now scarcely any part of my life upon which I look back with feelings of greater satisfaction. I am thankful, and ever shall be thankful, that I have been permitted to see something of that great work which God is carrying on in China.

Our instructions were to visit our own missionary stations in the two provinces of Shantung and Shansi, and report upon the work done. Further, we were to see all that could be seen of the work of other societies in those parts of China which we might visit. During our brief stay in that great empire we had the opportunity of inspecting the work of many missionary societies, and we were constantly moved to thank God for what we saw. We had read about missions in China, we had heard about them, and we were not disappointed when we were brought face to face with them; for extent, character, and worth they far exceeded our largest expectations; and so far from feeling that we had been deluded by exaggerated, extravagant, or garbled statements, we felt, as we passed from one mission station to another, that ‘ the half had not been told.’ Again and again have we said to missionary brethren as they have quietly unfolded to us the extent and results of the work in which they were engaged, ‘Why have you not told us this at home? It has all the charm of a romance.’

Pages 11-12

Herbert Stanley Jenkins , Medical Missionary to Shensi, China

Portrait: Herbert Stanley Jenkins [1874-1913]
Frontispiece

Herbert Stanley Jenkins [1874-1913] served with the Baptist Missionary Society in China. This biography also includes some material on the wider work of the BMS there.

My thanks to Redcliffe College for providing a copy of this public domain title for digitisation.

Richard Glover [1837-1919], Herbert Stanley Jenkins, M.D., F.R.C.S., Medical Missionary, Shensi, China with Some Notices of the Work of the Baptist Missionary Society in that Country. London: The Carey Press, 1914. Hbk. pp.155.

Contents

  • Author’s Note
  1. Earlier years
  2. The Work of the Baptist Missionary Society in China
  3. Shensi Work
  4. Entrance on Missionary Work
  5. The Medical Missionary
  6. The Revolution
  7. The Last Stage
  8. Some General Reflections
  9. Letters From Friends

Chapter 1: Earlier Years

The proper study of mankind is man – a study full of instruction for those who pursue it with real earnestness. The strange way in which purposes are formed, expanded, and achieved by inspirations of grace, and the honour which God puts on all faithfulness, demand attention. There is especial interest in noting how Providence, operating simultaneously on individual lives and also on nations, secures augmented results from each.

The outward features of Stanley Jenkins’ earlier life are soon told. He was born in Bristol in 1874; one of the younger members of a large family, most of them marked by physical energy, and constituting a typically happy and united home; a home where the Herbert Stanley Jenkins parents blended happily authority, love, and piety, and where the number of the children supplied the genial corrective of all selfish tendencies; a home, therefore, where all natural excellences might be expected to thrive, where good health and good temper prevented any early and weakening development of self-consciousness, where it was natural that all kindly qualities should develop.

In the history of his school-days nothing very remarkable is to be noticed, save that while still a youth (in his fourteenth year) the great awakening of the soul came to him.

Parental piety was the atmosphere in which his higher thoughts and purposes were matured. He was greatly helped by some of those activities which devote themselves to the spiritual quickening of the schoolboy. Some may criticize defects in these activities, saying they develop unduly self-consciousness, are too doctrinal in their presentation of the Gospel, and give a trend to the devout life tending to make it narrow, and lead to the idea that character is complete when conversion to God has taken place. Possibly there are grounds in some instances for such views. In the case of Stanley Jenkins no such influence can be traced. The great fact of his life was that Jesus Christ then aawned on his soul. In the language of St. Paul, “The light of the knowledge of the glory of God shone through the fac~ of Jesus Christ into his heart,” flooding it with a sunshine that never failed, but grew until it became the light of heaven….

Pages 11-13

‘For His Sake’: Elsie Marshall’s Life of Consecration and Devotion to China

Elsie Marshall [1869-1895]

Elsie Marshall served in China with the Church of England Zenana Mission Society until her untimely death in 1885. This is her story, told through extracts of her letters. My thanks to Redcliffe College for providing a copy of this public domain title for digitisation.

Elsie Marshall [1869-1895], ‘For His Sake’. A Record of a Life consecrated to God and devoted to China. Extracts From the Letters of Elsie Marshall, Martyred at Hwa-Sang, August 1, 1895, 6th edn. London: The Religious Tract Society, n.d. Hbk. pp.208. [Click to visit the download page for digitisation]

Contents

  • Introductory Memoir
  1. The Voyage Out
  2. Arrival in China
  3. At Fuh-ning
  4. At Kulianf, on the Hills near Foochow
  5. At Fuh-ning
  6. At Ku-cheng
  7. At Work in the District
  8. Kuliang For Hot Months and Journeys
  9. Sek-Check-Du
  10. Work Disttributed by the Vegetarian Riots, Which Ended in the Massacre at Hws-Sang, Ku-Cheng, August 1, 1895
  11. Extracts from Letters

Introductory Memoir

A short sketch of the life of the writer of the following record of missionary work in China will perhaps enhance its interest for the general reader, and make clear some of the personal allusions, which could not be well omitted without breaking the continuity of the letters. The letters themselves are published in the hope, and with the earnest prayer, in which it is certain the writer would (and perchance does) join, that their perusal may stir up still greater zeal in hastening forward the King’s business in the land of Sinim, which recent events-and not least amongst them the martyrdoms at Ku-cheng-will assuredly open up to the ‘ Divine Enterprise of Missions’; and lead many to adopt what she found to be the happiest of all lives: to give up home ‘for His sake,”in order to go and tell the love of Jesus to those who have never heard.

Page 3

Women’s Missionary Work in India and China

Cover: Glimpses of Women's Missionary Work in India and China.

Written shortly after the Jubilee of the Baptist Missionary Society (1867-1917), this book aims to provide a series of snapshots of the work done by female Baptist missionaries. It is illustrated by six photographic plates from India and China.

My thanks to Redcliffe College for providing a copy of this public domain title for digitisation.

George Hawker [1857-1932], Open the Window Eastward. Glimpses of Women’s Missionary Work in India and China. London: The Carey Press, [1917]. Hbk. pp.170. [Click to visit the download page for this title]

  • Preface
  1. Pioneers
  2. Zenana Echoes
  3. Zenana Schools
  4. Women’s Influence
  5. Village Itineration
  6. Boat-Tours in the Beels
  7. “Going-a-Plaguing”
  8. Famine Relief Work
  9. “Doctor Sahiba”
  10. An Industrial Settlement (Salamatpur)
  11. Education: Dehli, Entally and Ballygunge
  12. India: Review and Outlook
  13. Country Work in Shantung
  14. Bessie Campbell and Her Biographer
  15. Certain Women and their Stories
  16. In the Days of the Second Revolution
  17. The New Opportunity

Chapter 2: Zenana Echoes

When our missionary sisters entered the grudgingly opened doors of the zenanas, they were constrained, more markedly in some districts than in others, to make haste slowly. In a speech delivered in London in 1881, when the Mission was just fourteen years old, the Rev. R. F. Guyton described the evolution of zenana work proper in the city of Delhi, the scene of his own memorable labours. At first our sisters could attempt little more than the establishing of friendly relations by means of conversation on general topics. Later they were able to give lessons in reading, writing and secular subjects. Then they taught lace-work and other, feminine employments, which provided new interests and relieved the monotony of seclusion; and finally, when confidence had been secured and minds opened, they were able to introduce the Scriptures and urge the claims of Christ.

Mr. Guyton was of opinion that this policy of patience was entirely justified, and that more precipitate evangelism would have resulted in exclusion. Since that time zenana doors have been opening ever more swiftly and widely, and if the missionary staff were immensely increased, the members of it and their native assistants would find more than enough to do of actual gospel work.

In reading this address of Mr. Guyton’s, and relating it to other records, one is driven to reflect upon the appalling amount of inane and trivial talk which must have afflicted our women missionaries, taxing their patience to the point of exhaustion, in those early days, and, indeed, all the way along. Of course small talk is not peculiar to any race or to either sex, and if the conversation of the world were stenographed for a single day, and the, volume of it appraised by some commissioned angel of adequate endurance, it is gravely doubtful whether the talk of women would be adjudged to be vainer or more wearisome than that of men. That men think lightly of women’s matters is irrelevant. The angel critic, superior to masculine limitations and unbiased by masculine conceit, would weigh with equal scales….

Pages19-20.