Massacre at Sianfu

E.R. Beckman [1866-?], The Massacre at Sianfu and Other Experiences in Connection With the Scandinavian Alliance Mission of North America

This is an account of the experiences of members of the Scandinavian Alliance Mission of North America in China, during the Xinhai Revolution of 1911. My thanks to Redcliffe College for providing a copy of this public domain title for digitisation.

E.R. Beckman [1866-?], The Massacre at Sianfu and Other Experiences in Connection With the Scandinavian Alliance Mission of North America. Chicago: J.V. Martenson, 1913. Hbk. pp.138. [Click to visit the download page for this title]

Contents

  • Preface
  • The Scandinavian Alliance Mission
  • Field of Work in China of the Scandinavian Alliance Mission of North America
  • During Our Sojourn in the Homelands
  • Forebodings of the Revolution
  • The Revolutionary Outbreak
  • The Attack
  • Mr W.T. Vatne
  • Our Stay at the Military Academy
  • The Funeral
  • Confusing Conditions in General
  • The Journey to the Coast
  • Foreigners Murdered and Illtreated in Other Parts of the Country
  • Sympathy Shown Me at Shanghai and Other Places
  • Mr W.T. Want’s Account to the President
  • From Shanghai to Stockholm by the Siberian Route
  • New Trials

Preface

The terrible incident which took place at Sianfu, China, when the revolution broke out there in October 1911, has greatly stirred up the feelings of a large number of friends of the Mission in the homelands.
I have repeatedly been asked to relate the story of this outrage by which some of my fellow workers and I were cruelly beheaded our dear ones, whose blood was shed, so to speak, to saturate the gospel seed which had been sown du1·ing the preceeding years; and how I succeeded to rescue my youngest child, a four year old girl, by running through the raging mob, which pursued and hunted me throughout the night.
In order to satisfy the many friends who wished to know the details of this incident and still avoid the hard task of continually repeating this heartrenching story, a book was published in the Swedish language soon after I arrived in Sweden on my way from China relating this sorrowful event.

Page 5

History of the Presbyterian Mission to China and Formosa

James Johnston [1819-1905], China and Formosa. The Story of the Mission of the Presbyterian Church of England

This is a well-illustrated history of the work of the English Presbyterian mission in China and Formosa (now Taiwan). My thanks to the Cambridge Centre for Christianity Worldwide for providing a copy of this rare public domain title for digitisation.

James Johnston [1819-1905], China and Formosa. The Story of the Mission of the Presbyterian Church of England. London: Hazell, Watson & Viney, Ltd., 1897. Hbk. pp.400. [Click to visit the download page for this title]

Contents

  • Preface
  1. Origin of the China Mission of the Presbyterian Church of England
  2. The Mission Field
  3. The People and Their Disposition Towards Us
  4. The Practical Religion of the Chinese
  5. The Planting of the Mission
  6. Times of Blessing
  7. The Story of the Amoy Mission
  8. The Story of the Shatow Mission
  9. The Story of the Formosa Mission
  10. A Retrospect
  11. Looking Forward
  12. The Story of the Amoy Mission (continued)
  13. The Story of the Amoy Mission (continued)
  14. The Story of the Shatow Mission (continued)
  15. The Story of the Shatow Mission (continued)
  16. The Story of the Formosa Mission (continued)
  17. The Story of the Formosa Mission (continued)
  18. The Story of the Singapore Mission
  19. Facts and Reflections
  20. Other Missions in China
  • Appendix
  • Index

Preface

In writing the history of the Mission of the Presbyterian Church of England during the last fifty years, at the request of several of its Missionaries, and with the approval of the Committee, my great aim has been to bring the remote near, and to make the strange familiar. To do this I have endeavoured, by descriptions of the country and its people, to bring the field of labour, and the nature of the work, before the minds of our people at home, and by allowing the Missionaries to tell their own tale of difficulties, trials, and sorrows, and of triumphs, encouragements, and joys, in their own words, to bring them near to the hearts of all interested in the progress of the kingdom of God in heathen lands.

In this my chief difficulty has been the modest reserve of the Missionaries in all that was personal…

Page vii

Timothy Richard of China

Timothy Richard in the Library at Shanghai

Timothy Richard was born in Wales and was converted during the 1859-60 Revival. He responded to the call to overseas service and served with the Baptist Missionary Society in China. He became convinced that the indigenous church should be self-supporting and that evangelism was best done by native Chinese Christians. The Ex-patriate missionaries should devote their time to working with the intelligentsia of China and combine outreach with development. After the Boxer uprising of 1900 he was instrumental in the establishment of Shanghai University.

My thanks to Redcliffe College for making a copy of this public domain title available for digitisation.

William E. Soothill [1861-1935], Timothy Richard of China. Seer, Statesman, Missionary & Most Disinterested Adviser the Chinese Ever Had. London: Seeley, Service & Co. Ltd., 1924. Hbk. pp.330.

Visit the Timothy Richard page for the download link for this title and other resources.

Contents

  1. Foreword
  2. Early Life in Wales
  3. China in the Sixties
  4. Pioneering in Shantung & Manchuria
  5. Chefoo
  6. Farewell to Chefoo
  7. Ch’ing-Choo-Fu
  8. Famine Relief: Shantung
  9. Famine Relief: Shansi
  10. Pioneering in Shansi
  11. Developments in Shansi
  12. T’ai-yuan, Ch’ing-Chou & Peking
  13. First Furlough
  14. In Exile
  15. Christian Literature Society: Work in Shanghai
  16. Chino-Japanese War
  17. T’ien-T’ai
  18. Enlightening the Government on Missions
  19. The Reform Society
  20. Second Furlough
  21. The Reform Movement
  22. Second Furlough
  23. The Reform Movement
  24. The Boxer Madness
  25. The Shansi University: A Dream Fulfilled
  26. Between the Boxers & The Revolution
  27. Conferences at Home
  28. Visits to Japan & Korea
  29. The Revolution
  30. Buddhism
  31. Home Again
  • Index

Foreword

Dr Timothy Richard the subject of this biography, which must have been a labour of love to Professor Soothill, his co-worker in later years, was for over forty years an outstanding personality in China, and gained the respect and esteem of the Chinese people in a degree which it has been given to few foreigners to attain. My recollection of him dates from the seventies of last century, when he and a few other devoted missionaries threw themselves into the formidable task of organizing relief work in connection with an appalling famine in Shansi, and laid the foundation of all the subsequent efforts which have been made with so much success to cope with these constantly recurring calamities in China. Dr Richard’s work in Shansi brought him into close relations with the ruling classes, and convinced him of the necessity of diffusing throughout the country a knowledge of the humanitarian principles and methods of government practised in the West…

Biography of Archibald Orr Ewing

Archibald Orr Ewing [1857-1930]
Archibald Orr Ewing [1857-1930]

Archibald Orr Ewing [1857-1930] was born into a wealthy family in Scotland. Deeply influenced by his experience of the revival in Glasgow led by D.L. Moody in 1882 and by attending the Keswick Convention in 1885 he devoted himself to missionary service. He served with the China Inland Mission from 1886 to 1911.

My thanks to Book Aid for making a copy of this public domain title available for digitisation.

Marshall Broomhall [1866-1937], Archibald Orr Ewing. ‘That faithful and wise Steward’. London: China Inland Mission, 1930. Hbk. pp.150. [Click to visit the download page]

Contents

  • Foreword
  • A Celebrated Lawsuit
  • Things Temporal
  • Things Eternal
  • A Living Gospel
  • A Willing Servant
  • A Living Sacrifice
  • A Comforter of Many
  • A Cheerful; Giver
  • A Man in Christ
  • A Better Possession
  • Epilogue

Foreword

There are many men and women who have gladly devoted their lives to the mission field; there are many others who have generously given of their substance for the same cause; but only a few have been privileged to do both. Archibald Orr Ewing was one of these few. Though as a young man he inherited wealth, and had this world’s best before him, he definitely, unostentatiously, and wholly placed himself and his possessions on God’s altar for service.

Every soul is a sanctuary, and its true history can, at best, only be known in part by others. ‘The secret things belong unto the Lord our God; but the things that are revealed belong unto us and to our children for ever.’ That so much can be revealed of the inner history of Archibald Orr Ewing’ s life is due to the wealth of material placed at the writer’s disposal…

Page vii.

James Gilmour and His Boys

James Gilmour and His Boys

The “Boys” of the title are James Gilmour’s two sons, James and Willie. They had been sent back from China to England to school after the death of their Mother. This book is a selection of James Gilmour letters to them.

My thanks to Redcliffe College for providing a copy of this public domain title for digitisation.

Richard Lovett [1851-1904], James Gilmour and His Boys. London: Religious Tract Society, 1894. Hbk. pp.288. [Click to visit the download page]

Contents

  1. Introduction
  2. The Boyhood and Youth of James Gilmour
  3. Adventures in Central Mongolia
  4. Life And Work in Eastern Mongolia
  5. Second Visit to England, and Closing Years
  6. Last Days
  7. Pen-Pictures For Children, By Mr. Gilmour

Introduction

This volume is very different from all its forerunners in the New Year Gift Book Series; but I think the readers of it will find that it can well hold its own both in interest and in helpfulness with any of them. Some of those were biographies of great missionaries; some were descriptions of heathen children to whom your gifts were bringing the light and joy of the gospel; some were accounts of thrilling adventures and hard work done for Jesus Christ in North America, in New Guinea, in China, in India, in Mongolia, and in other distant parts of the earth.

The book is partly a biography, partly a series of adventures, partly a story of work done for Jesus Christ and of very hard trials bravely endured for Him and from love to sinful men…

page.9.

Your will find more material about James Gilmour here.

History of the Bible in China by Marshall Broomhall

Marshall Broomhall [1866-1937], The Bible in China

Marshall Broomhall provides a history of the translation of the forty versions of the Bible that were available in China by 1934. My thanks to Redcliffe College for providing a copy of this public domain title for digitisation.

Marshall Broomhall [1866-1937], The Bible in China. London: The China Inland Mission, 1934. Hbk. pp.190. [Click here to visit the download page]

Contents

  • Foreword
  • Our Obligations
  • By Way of Introduction

Part 1: The Bible in Preparation

  • Nestorian Pioneers
  • Under the Great Khans
  • In the Footsteps of Xavier
  • A New Force in Old China
  • Morrison and Marshman
  • The Delegates; Version
  • Gutzlaff and the Taiping Rebels
  • The People’s Bible
  • Unon Versions
  • Chinise Dialects
  • For the Tribes
  • The Scriptures in Manchu
  • Among the Mongols

Part 2: The Bible in Action

  • The Colporteur’s Task
  • The Colporteur’s Reward
  • Wise unto Salvation
  • The Power of the Word

Part 3: The Bible a Uniting Force

  • A Great Fellowship

Appendices

  • The Nestorian Tablet
  • List of Versions and Translations

Foreword

It is one hundred years since Robert Morrison died in China, and one hundred and twenty years since his Chinese translation of the New Testament was published. It is not unfitting that the centenary of Morrison’s death should see the remarkable story of the Bible in China published. It seems somewhat strange that this has not been done before. And now, by one of those unexpected coincidences which do occur, two records are being issued at the same time. On the very day on which we write this foreword-the whole book being finished-we have received from China a copy of the Rev. A. J. Garnier’s brochure of some eighty pages, entitled Chinese Versions of the Bible. Happily the two efforts do not clash.

Mr. Garnier’s concise pamphlet has been prepared, as his preface states, to be the basis of a Chinese Appendix to his translation of Professor G. Milligan’s The New Testament and its Transmission…

p.vii.

Behind the Ranges. Fraser of Lisuland S.W. China

James Outram Fraser [1886–1938]
 James Outram Fraser [1886–1938]
James Outram Fraser [1886–1938] was an English missionary who divided his time between China and Burma, working amongst the Lisu people who lives along the border. He worked on translating the New Testament in the Lisu language and established churches that were both funded and led by the Lisu converts.

My thanks to OMF International (UK) for their permission to place this in-copyright book on-line. It may be downloaded and used for free educational purposes, but may not be sold for profit without written permission from the copyrgiht holder. My thanks to Book Aid for making a copy available for digtisation.

Mrs Howard Taylor (aka. Mary Geraldine Guinness [1865-1949], Behind the Ranges. Fraser of Lisuland S.W. China. London & Redhill: Lutterworth Press & China Inland Mission, n.d. Hbk. pp.253. [Click to visit the download page]

Contents

  • Foreword
  1. Beginnings
  2. Young Life
  3. The Real Issue
  4. Mountain Men
  5. Missionary in Charge
  6. Banished to Burma
  7. Lisuland Again
  8. A Challenge
  9. A Decision
  10. Powers of Darkness
  11. A Fruitful Interlude
  12. The Prayer of Faith
  13. The Sword-Ladder Festival
  14. ‘Who Teacheth Like Him ?’
  15. The Letter Never Written
  16. ‘I Sent You To Reap’
  17. Love and Patience
  18. Blood of His Own
  19. A New Call
  20. ‘Good Ground’
  21. ‘A Hundredfold’
  22. The End in View
  23. Love’s Endurance
  24. Love’s Reward
  25. Marriage and Wider Ministry
  26. Fulfilment and Translation
  • Farewell

Pastor Hsi. Confucian Scholar and Christian by Geraldine Taylor

Pastor Hsi (Xi Shengmo)
Pastor Hsi (Xi Shengmo). Source: Wikipedia

Thanks largely to this book, there is more written about Pastor Hsi (Xi Shengmo) than any other 19th protestant Chinese Christian.  Hsi is notable for the way that he, rather than western missionaries, led the work of establishing churches and clinics for opium users in the areas where he worked.

My thanks to OMF International-UK for their permission to digitise and host this important book. It may be downloaded and used for free educational purposes, but not sold for profit without the explicit written permission of the copyright holder.

Geraldine Taylor [1865-1949], Pastor Hsi: Confucian Scholar and Christian, 23rd edn. London: China Inland Mission, 1900. Hbk. pp.293. [Click to visit the download page]

Contents

  • Editorial Note
  • Foreword
  • Introduction
  • Extracts from the Introduction written for the first edition by D.E. Hoste
  1. The Home of His Childhood
  2. Wedding an Unknown Bride
  3. Winning a Reputation
  4. The Swift Descent
  5. Dark Days in Shansi
  6. Light at Last
  7. Fishers of Men
  8. Drawing in the Net
  9. The Living Christ
  10. Stronger than All the Powers of the Enemy
  11. Called to Life Service
  12. The Great Change
  13. “Conqueror of Demons”
  14. Early Success and Failure
  15. Growing in Grace
  16. Starving the Village Idols
  17. Under-Shepherds: A Problem
  18. Light on the Problem
  19. Finding His Life-Work
  20. A Visit to the Capital
  21. How the Work Spread
  22. How God Provided
  23. A Fresh Advance
  24. Reinforcements
  25. Not Against Flesh and Blood
  26. For the Work of the Ministry
  27. West of the River
  28. A Winter’s Work at Hungtung
  29. Through Fire and Through Water
  30. A Wealthy Place
  31. The Burden and Heat of the Day
  32. The Refuges as Mission Stations
  33. The Middle Eden
  34. Ready to Depart
  35. Higher Service
  • Hymn by Pastor Hsi

Twelve Mighty Missionaries by Esthme Ethelind Enock [1874-1947]

Esthme Ethelind Enock [1874-1947], Twelve Mighty MissionariesEsthme Enock’s biographical sketches of 12 famous missionaries has just entered the public domain. This copy was kindly provided by Book Aid for digitisation.

In the table of contents below I have linked to the bibligraphy pages on Missiology.org.uk, where you will find further material on each missionary.

Esthme Ethelind Enock [1874-1947], Twelve Mighty Missionaries. London: Pickering & Inglis, Ltd., 1936. Hbk. pp.95. [Click to visit the download page]

Contents

  1. Pastor Hsi, China
  2. James Chalmers, New Guinea
  3. Alexander Mackay, Uganda
  4. Anthony Norris Groves, India
  5. Alexander Duff, India
  6. John Williams, Erromanga
  7. Samuel Marsden, Maoriland
  8. Samuel Pollard, China
  9. Hudson Taylor, China
  10. C.T. Studd, Central Africa
  11. Dan Crawford, Central Africa
  12. Dr Richard Williams, Tierra Del Fuego

Chapter 1. Pastor Hsi, China

The exact date of Pastor Hsi’s birthday does not seem to be recorded, but he was born probably in the Autumn of 1836. Till he was seven years old the little Hsi lived the usual free life of the son of a Chinese scholar, and was encouraged in every way to be overbearing and self-willed. Then he was sent to school, a school where a shrine of Confucius occupied the place of honour. Here the boy begins the studies which, it is hoped, will make him a “Princely Man.”

But, favourable though circumstances are, they do not satisfy the heart of this boy. At the early age of eight years, as he wandered through the incense-filled Temple and gazed at the hideous idols and vivid representations of punishments and terrors beyond the grave, he would ask himself, what was the use of living. “Men find no good, and in the end—?” he said to himself….

Griffith John: A Voice from China

Griffith John [1831-1912], A Voice From China
Griffith John. Image source – Wikipdia.
Griffith John [1831-1912], having been prevented by illness from returning home from China, sent instead this collection of his writings in order to stir others to new missionary endeavours.

My thanks to Redcliffe College for providing a copy of this book for digitisation. This title is in the public domain.

Griffith John [1831-1912], A Voice From China. London: James Clarke & Co., 1917. Hbk. pp.271. [Click to visit the download page]

Contents

  • Preface
  1. Then and Now
  2. The Supreme Motive in Christian Missions
  3. The Ideal Christian Life
  4. Why Do I Believe in Missions
  5. The Message
  6. The Missionary
  7. The Tract in China
  8. The Bible in China
  9. The Source of Power
  10. The Gospel in Hupeh
  11. The Gospel in Hunan
  12. Fear Not

Chapter 1: Then and Now

We have just reached the close of the first hundred years of Protestant missions in China, and I wish to call attention to the contrast between the present and the past. If we compare the state of things to-day with the state of things existing in China in Dr. Morrison’s day, we shall be able to some extent to realise how great is the work which has been wrought of God during this period in that great empire. We may also notice that the progress of Christian missions in China is but typical of the advance that has been made throughout the world in the same period. When Dr. Morrison went to China the country was, both legally and practically, closed to the missionary and to the Gospel. In those days it was a crime for a Chinese to teach, or for a foreigner to learn, the language…

Click here for more material on Griffith John.