1890 Deputation Visit to North China by Rev T.M. Morris

Cover: T.M. Morris [1830-1904], A Winter in North China with an Introduction by the Rev. Richard Glover of Bristol.

This is an account of a deputation tour of Baptist Missionary Society stations in Northern China by the Rev. T.M. Morris and Rev. Richard Glover.

My thanks to Redcliffe College for providing a copy of this public domain title for digitisation.

T.M. Morris [1830-1904], A Winter in North China with an Introduction by the Rev. Richard Glover of Bristol. London: The Religious Tract Society, 1892. Hbk. pp.256. [Click to visit the download page for this title]

Contents

  • Introduction
  • Author’s Preface
  1. From San Francisco to Yokohama
  2. Chefoo and Tien-Tsin
  3. From Tien-Tsin to Tsing-Chow-Fu
  4. Tsing-Chow-Fu
  5. Chow-Ping
  6. Chi-Nan-Fu
  7. The Great Plain of China
  8. T’ai-Yuen-Fu
  9. Peking
  10. An Interview with Li-Hung-Chang
  11. Shanghai
  12. Hankow, Hong-Kong, and Canton
  13. The Religions of China
  14. Fung-Shui
  15. Missionary Works and Methods in China

Author’s Preface

The question of sending out a deputation to China had long been considered by the committee of the Baptist Missionary Society, and our missionaries in China had been long asking that a deputation should be sent. ‘Our work,’ they said, ‘has been criticized by those who have never seen it, and who have known little or nothing of the circumstances in which and the conditions under which that work is being carried on. Our work has never been described but by ourselves, and there are many who think, and some who say, that we are not the fittest people to estimate the value of our own work. Send out, then, two men in whom you have confidence, and in whom we shall have confidence. Let them visit our stations and see our work with their own eyes, and on their return give a faithful, unbiassed report of what they have seen and heard. With that report, whatever may be its character, we shall be satisfied, and we trust you will be satisfied.’

The request was felt to be reasonable, but it was one which could not be easily complied with. In 1890, however, the committee felt that a deputation ought to be sent: out without further delay, and Dr. Glover and myself were asked to undertake the work. For myself, I may say that I never entered upon any work with more hesitation and reluctance; but there is now scarcely any part of my life upon which I look back with feelings of greater satisfaction. I am thankful, and ever shall be thankful, that I have been permitted to see something of that great work which God is carrying on in China.

Our instructions were to visit our own missionary stations in the two provinces of Shantung and Shansi, and report upon the work done. Further, we were to see all that could be seen of the work of other societies in those parts of China which we might visit. During our brief stay in that great empire we had the opportunity of inspecting the work of many missionary societies, and we were constantly moved to thank God for what we saw. We had read about missions in China, we had heard about them, and we were not disappointed when we were brought face to face with them; for extent, character, and worth they far exceeded our largest expectations; and so far from feeling that we had been deluded by exaggerated, extravagant, or garbled statements, we felt, as we passed from one mission station to another, that ‘ the half had not been told.’ Again and again have we said to missionary brethren as they have quietly unfolded to us the extent and results of the work in which they were engaged, ‘Why have you not told us this at home? It has all the charm of a romance.’

Pages 11-12

Herbert Stanley Jenkins , Medical Missionary to Shensi, China

Portrait: Herbert Stanley Jenkins [1874-1913]
Frontispiece

Herbert Stanley Jenkins [1874-1913] served with the Baptist Missionary Society in China. This biography also includes some material on the wider work of the BMS there.

My thanks to Redcliffe College for providing a copy of this public domain title for digitisation.

Richard Glover [1837-1919], Herbert Stanley Jenkins, M.D., F.R.C.S., Medical Missionary, Shensi, China with Some Notices of the Work of the Baptist Missionary Society in that Country. London: The Carey Press, 1914. Hbk. pp.155.

Contents

  • Author’s Note
  1. Earlier years
  2. The Work of the Baptist Missionary Society in China
  3. Shensi Work
  4. Entrance on Missionary Work
  5. The Medical Missionary
  6. The Revolution
  7. The Last Stage
  8. Some General Reflections
  9. Letters From Friends

Chapter 1: Earlier Years

The proper study of mankind is man – a study full of instruction for those who pursue it with real earnestness. The strange way in which purposes are formed, expanded, and achieved by inspirations of grace, and the honour which God puts on all faithfulness, demand attention. There is especial interest in noting how Providence, operating simultaneously on individual lives and also on nations, secures augmented results from each.

The outward features of Stanley Jenkins’ earlier life are soon told. He was born in Bristol in 1874; one of the younger members of a large family, most of them marked by physical energy, and constituting a typically happy and united home; a home where the Herbert Stanley Jenkins parents blended happily authority, love, and piety, and where the number of the children supplied the genial corrective of all selfish tendencies; a home, therefore, where all natural excellences might be expected to thrive, where good health and good temper prevented any early and weakening development of self-consciousness, where it was natural that all kindly qualities should develop.

In the history of his school-days nothing very remarkable is to be noticed, save that while still a youth (in his fourteenth year) the great awakening of the soul came to him.

Parental piety was the atmosphere in which his higher thoughts and purposes were matured. He was greatly helped by some of those activities which devote themselves to the spiritual quickening of the schoolboy. Some may criticize defects in these activities, saying they develop unduly self-consciousness, are too doctrinal in their presentation of the Gospel, and give a trend to the devout life tending to make it narrow, and lead to the idea that character is complete when conversion to God has taken place. Possibly there are grounds in some instances for such views. In the case of Stanley Jenkins no such influence can be traced. The great fact of his life was that Jesus Christ then aawned on his soul. In the language of St. Paul, “The light of the knowledge of the glory of God shone through the fac~ of Jesus Christ into his heart,” flooding it with a sunshine that never failed, but grew until it became the light of heaven….

Pages 11-13

‘For His Sake’: Elsie Marshall’s Life of Consecration and Devotion to China

Elsie Marshall [1869-1895]

Elsie Marshall served in China with the Church of England Zenana Mission Society until her untimely death in 1885. This is her story, told through extracts of her letters. My thanks to Redcliffe College for providing a copy of this public domain title for digitisation.

Elsie Marshall [1869-1895], ‘For His Sake’. A Record of a Life consecrated to God and devoted to China. Extracts From the Letters of Elsie Marshall, Martyred at Hwa-Sang, August 1, 1895, 6th edn. London: The Religious Tract Society, n.d. Hbk. pp.208. [Click to visit the download page for digitisation]

Contents

  • Introductory Memoir
  1. The Voyage Out
  2. Arrival in China
  3. At Fuh-ning
  4. At Kulianf, on the Hills near Foochow
  5. At Fuh-ning
  6. At Ku-cheng
  7. At Work in the District
  8. Kuliang For Hot Months and Journeys
  9. Sek-Check-Du
  10. Work Disttributed by the Vegetarian Riots, Which Ended in the Massacre at Hws-Sang, Ku-Cheng, August 1, 1895
  11. Extracts from Letters

Introductory Memoir

A short sketch of the life of the writer of the following record of missionary work in China will perhaps enhance its interest for the general reader, and make clear some of the personal allusions, which could not be well omitted without breaking the continuity of the letters. The letters themselves are published in the hope, and with the earnest prayer, in which it is certain the writer would (and perchance does) join, that their perusal may stir up still greater zeal in hastening forward the King’s business in the land of Sinim, which recent events-and not least amongst them the martyrdoms at Ku-cheng-will assuredly open up to the ‘ Divine Enterprise of Missions’; and lead many to adopt what she found to be the happiest of all lives: to give up home ‘for His sake,”in order to go and tell the love of Jesus to those who have never heard.

Page 3

Women’s Missionary Work in India and China

Cover: Glimpses of Women's Missionary Work in India and China.

Written shortly after the Jubilee of the Baptist Missionary Society (1867-1917), this book aims to provide a series of snapshots of the work done by female Baptist missionaries. It is illustrated by six photographic plates from India and China.

My thanks to Redcliffe College for providing a copy of this public domain title for digitisation.

George Hawker [1857-1932], Open the Window Eastward. Glimpses of Women’s Missionary Work in India and China. London: The Carey Press, [1917]. Hbk. pp.170. [Click to visit the download page for this title]

  • Preface
  1. Pioneers
  2. Zenana Echoes
  3. Zenana Schools
  4. Women’s Influence
  5. Village Itineration
  6. Boat-Tours in the Beels
  7. “Going-a-Plaguing”
  8. Famine Relief Work
  9. “Doctor Sahiba”
  10. An Industrial Settlement (Salamatpur)
  11. Education: Dehli, Entally and Ballygunge
  12. India: Review and Outlook
  13. Country Work in Shantung
  14. Bessie Campbell and Her Biographer
  15. Certain Women and their Stories
  16. In the Days of the Second Revolution
  17. The New Opportunity

Chapter 2: Zenana Echoes

When our missionary sisters entered the grudgingly opened doors of the zenanas, they were constrained, more markedly in some districts than in others, to make haste slowly. In a speech delivered in London in 1881, when the Mission was just fourteen years old, the Rev. R. F. Guyton described the evolution of zenana work proper in the city of Delhi, the scene of his own memorable labours. At first our sisters could attempt little more than the establishing of friendly relations by means of conversation on general topics. Later they were able to give lessons in reading, writing and secular subjects. Then they taught lace-work and other, feminine employments, which provided new interests and relieved the monotony of seclusion; and finally, when confidence had been secured and minds opened, they were able to introduce the Scriptures and urge the claims of Christ.

Mr. Guyton was of opinion that this policy of patience was entirely justified, and that more precipitate evangelism would have resulted in exclusion. Since that time zenana doors have been opening ever more swiftly and widely, and if the missionary staff were immensely increased, the members of it and their native assistants would find more than enough to do of actual gospel work.

In reading this address of Mr. Guyton’s, and relating it to other records, one is driven to reflect upon the appalling amount of inane and trivial talk which must have afflicted our women missionaries, taxing their patience to the point of exhaustion, in those early days, and, indeed, all the way along. Of course small talk is not peculiar to any race or to either sex, and if the conversation of the world were stenographed for a single day, and the, volume of it appraised by some commissioned angel of adequate endurance, it is gravely doubtful whether the talk of women would be adjudged to be vainer or more wearisome than that of men. That men think lightly of women’s matters is irrelevant. The angel critic, superior to masculine limitations and unbiased by masculine conceit, would weigh with equal scales….

Pages19-20.

Massacre at Sianfu

E.R. Beckman [1866-?], The Massacre at Sianfu and Other Experiences in Connection With the Scandinavian Alliance Mission of North America

This is an account of the experiences of members of the Scandinavian Alliance Mission of North America in China, during the Xinhai Revolution of 1911. My thanks to Redcliffe College for providing a copy of this public domain title for digitisation.

E.R. Beckman [1866-?], The Massacre at Sianfu and Other Experiences in Connection With the Scandinavian Alliance Mission of North America. Chicago: J.V. Martenson, 1913. Hbk. pp.138. [Click to visit the download page for this title]

Contents

  • Preface
  • The Scandinavian Alliance Mission
  • Field of Work in China of the Scandinavian Alliance Mission of North America
  • During Our Sojourn in the Homelands
  • Forebodings of the Revolution
  • The Revolutionary Outbreak
  • The Attack
  • Mr W.T. Vatne
  • Our Stay at the Military Academy
  • The Funeral
  • Confusing Conditions in General
  • The Journey to the Coast
  • Foreigners Murdered and Illtreated in Other Parts of the Country
  • Sympathy Shown Me at Shanghai and Other Places
  • Mr W.T. Want’s Account to the President
  • From Shanghai to Stockholm by the Siberian Route
  • New Trials

Preface

The terrible incident which took place at Sianfu, China, when the revolution broke out there in October 1911, has greatly stirred up the feelings of a large number of friends of the Mission in the homelands.
I have repeatedly been asked to relate the story of this outrage by which some of my fellow workers and I were cruelly beheaded our dear ones, whose blood was shed, so to speak, to saturate the gospel seed which had been sown du1·ing the preceeding years; and how I succeeded to rescue my youngest child, a four year old girl, by running through the raging mob, which pursued and hunted me throughout the night.
In order to satisfy the many friends who wished to know the details of this incident and still avoid the hard task of continually repeating this heartrenching story, a book was published in the Swedish language soon after I arrived in Sweden on my way from China relating this sorrowful event.

Page 5

History of the Presbyterian Mission to China and Formosa

James Johnston [1819-1905], China and Formosa. The Story of the Mission of the Presbyterian Church of England

This is a well-illustrated history of the work of the English Presbyterian mission in China and Formosa (now Taiwan). My thanks to the Cambridge Centre for Christianity Worldwide for providing a copy of this rare public domain title for digitisation.

James Johnston [1819-1905], China and Formosa. The Story of the Mission of the Presbyterian Church of England. London: Hazell, Watson & Viney, Ltd., 1897. Hbk. pp.400. [Click to visit the download page for this title]

Contents

  • Preface
  1. Origin of the China Mission of the Presbyterian Church of England
  2. The Mission Field
  3. The People and Their Disposition Towards Us
  4. The Practical Religion of the Chinese
  5. The Planting of the Mission
  6. Times of Blessing
  7. The Story of the Amoy Mission
  8. The Story of the Shatow Mission
  9. The Story of the Formosa Mission
  10. A Retrospect
  11. Looking Forward
  12. The Story of the Amoy Mission (continued)
  13. The Story of the Amoy Mission (continued)
  14. The Story of the Shatow Mission (continued)
  15. The Story of the Shatow Mission (continued)
  16. The Story of the Formosa Mission (continued)
  17. The Story of the Formosa Mission (continued)
  18. The Story of the Singapore Mission
  19. Facts and Reflections
  20. Other Missions in China
  • Appendix
  • Index

Preface

In writing the history of the Mission of the Presbyterian Church of England during the last fifty years, at the request of several of its Missionaries, and with the approval of the Committee, my great aim has been to bring the remote near, and to make the strange familiar. To do this I have endeavoured, by descriptions of the country and its people, to bring the field of labour, and the nature of the work, before the minds of our people at home, and by allowing the Missionaries to tell their own tale of difficulties, trials, and sorrows, and of triumphs, encouragements, and joys, in their own words, to bring them near to the hearts of all interested in the progress of the kingdom of God in heathen lands.

In this my chief difficulty has been the modest reserve of the Missionaries in all that was personal…

Page vii

Timothy Richard of China

Timothy Richard in the Library at Shanghai

Timothy Richard was born in Wales and was converted during the 1859-60 Revival. He responded to the call to overseas service and served with the Baptist Missionary Society in China. He became convinced that the indigenous church should be self-supporting and that evangelism was best done by native Chinese Christians. The Ex-patriate missionaries should devote their time to working with the intelligentsia of China and combine outreach with development. After the Boxer uprising of 1900 he was instrumental in the establishment of Shanghai University.

My thanks to Redcliffe College for making a copy of this public domain title available for digitisation.

William E. Soothill [1861-1935], Timothy Richard of China. Seer, Statesman, Missionary & Most Disinterested Adviser the Chinese Ever Had. London: Seeley, Service & Co. Ltd., 1924. Hbk. pp.330.

Visit the Timothy Richard page for the download link for this title and other resources.

Contents

  1. Foreword
  2. Early Life in Wales
  3. China in the Sixties
  4. Pioneering in Shantung & Manchuria
  5. Chefoo
  6. Farewell to Chefoo
  7. Ch’ing-Choo-Fu
  8. Famine Relief: Shantung
  9. Famine Relief: Shansi
  10. Pioneering in Shansi
  11. Developments in Shansi
  12. T’ai-yuan, Ch’ing-Chou & Peking
  13. First Furlough
  14. In Exile
  15. Christian Literature Society: Work in Shanghai
  16. Chino-Japanese War
  17. T’ien-T’ai
  18. Enlightening the Government on Missions
  19. The Reform Society
  20. Second Furlough
  21. The Reform Movement
  22. Second Furlough
  23. The Reform Movement
  24. The Boxer Madness
  25. The Shansi University: A Dream Fulfilled
  26. Between the Boxers & The Revolution
  27. Conferences at Home
  28. Visits to Japan & Korea
  29. The Revolution
  30. Buddhism
  31. Home Again
  • Index

Foreword

Dr Timothy Richard the subject of this biography, which must have been a labour of love to Professor Soothill, his co-worker in later years, was for over forty years an outstanding personality in China, and gained the respect and esteem of the Chinese people in a degree which it has been given to few foreigners to attain. My recollection of him dates from the seventies of last century, when he and a few other devoted missionaries threw themselves into the formidable task of organizing relief work in connection with an appalling famine in Shansi, and laid the foundation of all the subsequent efforts which have been made with so much success to cope with these constantly recurring calamities in China. Dr Richard’s work in Shansi brought him into close relations with the ruling classes, and convinced him of the necessity of diffusing throughout the country a knowledge of the humanitarian principles and methods of government practised in the West…

Biography of Archibald Orr Ewing

Archibald Orr Ewing [1857-1930]
Archibald Orr Ewing [1857-1930]

Archibald Orr Ewing [1857-1930] was born into a wealthy family in Scotland. Deeply influenced by his experience of the revival in Glasgow led by D.L. Moody in 1882 and by attending the Keswick Convention in 1885 he devoted himself to missionary service. He served with the China Inland Mission from 1886 to 1911.

My thanks to Book Aid for making a copy of this public domain title available for digitisation.

Marshall Broomhall [1866-1937], Archibald Orr Ewing. ‘That faithful and wise Steward’. London: China Inland Mission, 1930. Hbk. pp.150. [Click to visit the download page]

Contents

  • Foreword
  • A Celebrated Lawsuit
  • Things Temporal
  • Things Eternal
  • A Living Gospel
  • A Willing Servant
  • A Living Sacrifice
  • A Comforter of Many
  • A Cheerful; Giver
  • A Man in Christ
  • A Better Possession
  • Epilogue

Foreword

There are many men and women who have gladly devoted their lives to the mission field; there are many others who have generously given of their substance for the same cause; but only a few have been privileged to do both. Archibald Orr Ewing was one of these few. Though as a young man he inherited wealth, and had this world’s best before him, he definitely, unostentatiously, and wholly placed himself and his possessions on God’s altar for service.

Every soul is a sanctuary, and its true history can, at best, only be known in part by others. ‘The secret things belong unto the Lord our God; but the things that are revealed belong unto us and to our children for ever.’ That so much can be revealed of the inner history of Archibald Orr Ewing’ s life is due to the wealth of material placed at the writer’s disposal…

Page vii.

James Gilmour and His Boys

James Gilmour and His Boys

The “Boys” of the title are James Gilmour’s two sons, James and Willie. They had been sent back from China to England to school after the death of their Mother. This book is a selection of James Gilmour letters to them.

My thanks to Redcliffe College for providing a copy of this public domain title for digitisation.

Richard Lovett [1851-1904], James Gilmour and His Boys. London: Religious Tract Society, 1894. Hbk. pp.288. [Click to visit the download page]

Contents

  1. Introduction
  2. The Boyhood and Youth of James Gilmour
  3. Adventures in Central Mongolia
  4. Life And Work in Eastern Mongolia
  5. Second Visit to England, and Closing Years
  6. Last Days
  7. Pen-Pictures For Children, By Mr. Gilmour

Introduction

This volume is very different from all its forerunners in the New Year Gift Book Series; but I think the readers of it will find that it can well hold its own both in interest and in helpfulness with any of them. Some of those were biographies of great missionaries; some were descriptions of heathen children to whom your gifts were bringing the light and joy of the gospel; some were accounts of thrilling adventures and hard work done for Jesus Christ in North America, in New Guinea, in China, in India, in Mongolia, and in other distant parts of the earth.

The book is partly a biography, partly a series of adventures, partly a story of work done for Jesus Christ and of very hard trials bravely endured for Him and from love to sinful men…

page.9.

Your will find more material about James Gilmour here.

History of the Bible in China by Marshall Broomhall

Marshall Broomhall [1866-1937], The Bible in China

Marshall Broomhall provides a history of the translation of the forty versions of the Bible that were available in China by 1934. My thanks to Redcliffe College for providing a copy of this public domain title for digitisation.

Marshall Broomhall [1866-1937], The Bible in China. London: The China Inland Mission, 1934. Hbk. pp.190. [Click here to visit the download page]

Contents

  • Foreword
  • Our Obligations
  • By Way of Introduction

Part 1: The Bible in Preparation

  • Nestorian Pioneers
  • Under the Great Khans
  • In the Footsteps of Xavier
  • A New Force in Old China
  • Morrison and Marshman
  • The Delegates; Version
  • Gutzlaff and the Taiping Rebels
  • The People’s Bible
  • Unon Versions
  • Chinise Dialects
  • For the Tribes
  • The Scriptures in Manchu
  • Among the Mongols

Part 2: The Bible in Action

  • The Colporteur’s Task
  • The Colporteur’s Reward
  • Wise unto Salvation
  • The Power of the Word

Part 3: The Bible a Uniting Force

  • A Great Fellowship

Appendices

  • The Nestorian Tablet
  • List of Versions and Translations

Foreword

It is one hundred years since Robert Morrison died in China, and one hundred and twenty years since his Chinese translation of the New Testament was published. It is not unfitting that the centenary of Morrison’s death should see the remarkable story of the Bible in China published. It seems somewhat strange that this has not been done before. And now, by one of those unexpected coincidences which do occur, two records are being issued at the same time. On the very day on which we write this foreword-the whole book being finished-we have received from China a copy of the Rev. A. J. Garnier’s brochure of some eighty pages, entitled Chinese Versions of the Bible. Happily the two efforts do not clash.

Mr. Garnier’s concise pamphlet has been prepared, as his preface states, to be the basis of a Chinese Appendix to his translation of Professor G. Milligan’s The New Testament and its Transmission…

p.vii.