Missionary Training Book on India from 1909

Surendra Kumar Datta, The Desire of IndiaThis book was written as a text book to provide information on the state of mission work in India. As such it provides an useful historical summary of the growth of the church in that country prior to World War I.

The PDF is larger than usual because the book contains some superb greyscale photographs and a colour map which I wanted to make available in a high-quality format.

Surendra Kumar Datta, The Desire of India. London: Church Missionary Society, 1909. Hbk. pp.320.  [Download complete book in PDF]

Reproduced by kind permission of the Church Missionary Society.

Contents

Editorial Note
Author’s Preface
Note on Pronunciation

1 – The Land and its Inhabitants
2 – The Life of the People
3 – India’s Search
4 – India’s Invaders
5 – Christianity in India
6 – Problems and Methods
7 – The Indian Church
8 – The Need of India

Chart of Indian History
Appendices
Bibliography
Index

The Desire Of India

Chapter I

The Land and Its Inhabitants

For centuries Western nations have looked The Wealth of upon India as a land of marvellous wealth, India and the splendours of her kings have seemed beyond the power of imagination. It was the story of India’s wealth that sent Columbus · in quest of the Western route when he discovered America. It was this story that excited the cupidity of Europe, and led to the establishment of British rule in India. Closer investigation has revealed how disappointing have been these dreams of riches. India’s material resources do not approach those of China, and it is questionable whether her people have the capacity to develop them with the vigour and energy of the European and Mongolian races. India’s wealth lies in her people. Their spiritual genius and their religious instincts are her best and most precious treasure. Her greatest sons have ever been possessed with a passion to know the Real and the Infinite, and have pursued it with earnestness of purpose. Their children have entered into a heritage of spiritual capacities and ideals, the development of which may mean the enriching of the world. [Continue reading]

Roland Bateman, Missionary Bible Translator in the Punjab

R. Maconachie, Rowland Bateman. Nineteenth Century ApostleRoland Bateman [1860-1916] served as a Bible translator in the Punjab. This book, written by a close friend in the Indian Civil Service, tells the story of his life and work.

R. Maconachie, Rowland Bateman. Nineteenth Century Apostle. London: Church Missionary Society, 1917. Hbk. pp.208. [Click to download in PDF]

Reproduced by kind permission of the Church Missionary Society.

Contents

1 – Parentage, Birth, and Early Days
2 – The Punjab as a Missionary Environment
3 – His Personality
4 – Work at Dera Ismail Khan, 1868-9
5 – Work at Amritsar and Lahore, 1869-72
6 – Itineration From Manhopur, 1872-4
7 – Early Visits to Narowal, 1872-4
8 – Narowal, Home, and Narowal Again-Typhoid Fever, 1874-7
9 – Clarkabad – Marriage – Second Furlough – Narowal – Kashmir, 1876-85
10 – Narowal – Three Visits to England – Beginning of “Outcaste” Work – Last Years at Narowal, 1886-97
11 – Home – Canada – The Indian Aftermath – Last Days in India, 1897-1902
12 – A “Fisher of Men” – Living Epistles
13 – Deputation Work – Sermons – Addresses
14 – R.B. as He Appeared to His Friends
15 – Work in England, 1902-15
16 – The End – A Beginning
Postscript
Appendix
Index

Preface

If any reader of this book is given to the habit of “skipping over” a Preface, I hope he will make an exception in the present case, otherwise an injustice may be done to him whose life is here described, as well as to the writer, though that is a point of less importance. Had Rowland Bateman (or as I shall generally call him for convenience “R. B.”) followed his own inclinations, he would not have had his biography written at all. During the course, however, of his last illness, representations were made to him that an account of the work which God had done through him might still after his death serve the great cause to which he had so whole-heartedly given his life. After some hesitation he acquiesced in the proposal, but expressed his wish that I should write the story. I take up the task therefore as a trust, and can only hope that remembering steadily the purpose of the book, and doing my best to represent faithfully the man and his work, I may produce something not quite unworthy of the “noble dead.” [Continue reading]

Arthur Neve of Kashmir by A.P. Shepherd

A Wayside Audience - Dr. A. Neve and Mr. Gustafson in the Shigar Valley

Arthur Neve of Kashmir by A.P. Shepherd

The case of Kashmir illustrates well one of the problems one faces when in dividing the world according to modern national borders when studying the history of mission. Both boundaries and country names have changed over time, so it is often difficult to decide in which country to place some titles.

Both India and Pakistan both appear in the top 4 countries requested in my Facebook Group Poll, so I hope that this account of Arthur Neve’s life as a medical missionary proves of interest.

A.P. Shepherd, Arthur Neve of Kashmir. London: Church Missionary Society, 1926. Hbk. pp.136. Click to download in PDF.

This title is reproduced by kind permission of the Church Missionary Society.

Contents

1 – Boyhood
2 – The Spoil of Conquerors
3 – On the Road to Srinagar
4 – The City of the Sun
5 – The Hospital
6 – The Doctor on His Rounds
7 – The Earthquake
8 – The City of Dreadful Death
9 – A Mountain Holiday
10 – Some Patients
11 – On the Great Trade Route
12 – Flood, Famine, and Plague
13 – The Healing Hand
14 – After Thirty Years
15 – Home Life and Holidays
16 – War Pictures
17 – L’Envoi

Bibliography

Foreword

It is written of an officer in the army of King Charles I that “he served his king with difficult, dangerous, and ‘expensive loyalty.” These words aptly describe Arthur Neve of Kashmir and the service which he gave so unsparingly for thirty-eight years in Kashmir and beyond. Endowed with gifts which would have won him fame and distinction at home, he yet chose to devote his life to the service of God and humanity in one of the world’s backwaters.

No attempt has been made in these pages to give a complete and detailed account of Dr. Neve’s career; but it has seemed well to present in broad outline some pictures of the man at his work in order to show to the men and women of to-day the life of a medical missionary. Dr. Neve’s desire was “to make it easier for those who come after.” The hospital at Srinagar, where his brother still works, and the hospitals along the North-West Frontier are waiting with eager longing to welcome physicians and surgeons who will build on foundations that were well laid by the great men who have gone before.

C.M.S.,
Salisbury Square,
July, 1926

[Continue reading]

William Carey’s Enquiry on-line

An Enquiry into the Obligation of Christians to Use MEans For the Conversion of the Heathen by William CareyWilliam Carey’s Enquiry into the Obligation of Christians… is probably one of the most influential documents in the history of missions. Among other things it led to the founding of the Baptist Missionary Society in the United Kingdom. This is a facsimile of the original which was published in Leicester 1792.

William Carey [1761-1834], An Enquiry into the Obligations of Christians to Use Means For the Conversion of the Heathens in Which the State of the Different Nations of the World, the Success of Former Undertakings, and the Practicability of Further Undertakings, are Considered. Leicester: Ann Ireland, 1792. Hbk. pp.87. Click to download in PDF.

Contents

  1. An Enquiry whether the Commission given by our Lord to his Disciples be not binding on us
  2. Containing a Short Review of former Undertakings for the Conversion of the Heathen
  3.  Containing a Survey of the Present State of the World
  4. The Practicability of something being done, more than what is done, for the Conversion of the Heathen
  5. An Enquiry into the Duty of Christians in general, and what Means ought to be used, in order to promote this Work

Introduction

As our blessed Lord has required us to pray that his kingdom may come, and his will be done on earth as it is in heaven, it becomes us not only to express our desires of that event by words, but to use every-lawful method to spread the knowledge of his name. In order to this, it is necessary that we should become, in some measure acquainted with the religious state of the world; and as this is an object we should be prompted to pursue, not only by the gospel of our Redeemer, but even by the feelings of humanity, so an inclination to conscientious activity therein would form one of the strongest proofs that we are the subjects of grace, and partakers of that spirit of universal benevolence and genuine philanthropy, which appear so eminent in the character of God himself. [Continue reading]

Missionary Heroines of the Cross On-line

Missionary Heroines of the Cross by Canon E C DawsonCanon E.C. Dawson’s biographical study of Missionary Heroines of the 19th Century is now available for free download in PDF. The book, which is abridged from a longer work by the same author contains short accounts of the following:

Mrs. Anne Duff – wife of Alexander Duff, missionary to India.

Mrs. Robert Clark – missionary to Pakistan/Afghanistan

Charlotte Tucker, missionary to India

Fanny Jane Butler [1850-1889], the first lady doctor in India.

Mary Reed [1854-1943], Irene Petrie and Alice Marval,, all missionaries to India.

Mrs. Hudson Taylor and Mrs. Polhill

Mrs. Loiusa Stewart, wife of Robert Stewart, missionaries to China.

Mrs. McDougall, missionary to Sarawak.

Mrs. Elizabeth Maria Bowen Thompson [1794-1869], missionary to Syria,

Fidelia Fiske [1816-1864], missionary to Turkey.

Mrs. Rosine Krapf, German missionary to Kenya.

Anna Hinderer [1827-1870], missionary to Nigeria.

Madame Coillard and many more.

Click here to download the complete volume, including illustrations.