Mary Slessor The Dundee Factory Girl by J.J. Ellis

J.J. Ellis [1853-?], Mary Slessor. The Dundee Factory Girl who became a Devoted African MissionaryThe story of Mary Mitchell Slessor’s [1848-1915] work in Calabar, Nigeria was truly remarkable, as Andrew C. Ross notes in the Biographical Dictionary of Christian Missions. [p.624.]:

Her life is an example of Christian inculturation, but regrettably it was trivialized by a romantic “white queen of Okoyong” attitude toward her in Britain.

J.J. Ellis [1853-?], Mary Slessor. The Dundee Factory Girl who became a Devoted African Missionary. Kilmarnock: John Ritchie, n.d. Hbk. pp.80. [Click to download in PDF]

Contents

Foreword

  1. A Young Christian who was old enough to win souls
  2. A Loyal Missionary with Ideas and Visions of her own
  3. A Bold Pioneer who greatly dared for Christ; A Call for Courage in our Work for God
  4. A Good “Ma” who was also a Great Queen. A Proof that Love always conquers
  5. A Poor Woman who was enriched by what she gave above; A Sure method of securing True Wealth

Chapter 1

“One of the deepest instincts of our ·nature teaches the preciousness of severity,” said John Addington Symonds, but it is hard to believe him while the soul stings with injustice, hardship, or pain. Mary Slessor born at Gilcomston by Aberdeen, 2nd December, 1848, was educated under the harshest conditions, but she was kept sweet by the love of God in her frail mother. She had few advantages, and many crushing difficulties, but she shows what can be done by those who have few chances, but who are Christ’s, and are willing to be nothing, that He may be glorified. First the lassie was brought out of nature’s darkness and at once set to work to carry the light to others, and all her days she went forward carrying the lamp to show everyone the way to happiness and peace.

Her father was a shoemaker, and at times sober, kindly and tender. But he lacked a saving interest in Christ, and before long became a victim of the drink sin. Gradually the octopus arms tightened their grip, and the more they grasped the less the deluded man desired to be free. Mary’s mother was one of those sweet, frail women for whom a bad man has a fascination. The mothering instinct is useful but it can be perverted as it was in this case, for that husband grew the worse the more he was loved.  [Continue reading]