Primitive Methodism on the Island of Fernando Po

Nathaniel Boocock [1860-1944], Our Fernandian MissionsFernando Po (now called Bioko) is an island located off the coast of Cameroon in West Africa which form s the most northerly territory of the nation of Equatorial Guinea. Nathaniel Boocock’s book tells the story of mission work under taken there up to 1912 under the auspices of Primitive Methodist African Missions. My thanks to Redcliffe College for providing me with a copy of this volume to digitise. This book is in the public domain.

Nathaniel Boocock [1860-1944], Our Fernandian Missions. London: W.A. Hammond, 1912. Hbk. pp.96.[Click to download complete book in PDF]

Contents

Preface

  1. Fernando Po
  2. The People
  3. Santa Isabel
  4. San Carlos
  5. Banni
  6. Bottler Point
  7. “As Other See Us”

Chapter 1

Fernando Po is an island 46 miles in length and 26 miles in breadth, and is situated in the Gulf of Guinea, 24 miles from the main-land. It consists of a huge mountain adorned with beautiful palms. The peak of this mountain towers over 10,000 feet above the sea level. Its grandeur can hardly be surpassed, especially when the setting sun plays upon the precipitous ravines, the outcome of volcanic outbursts. Lying between 3 and 4 degrees North latitude and 8 and 9 degrees East longitude, its position near the equator accounts for its notorious unhealthiness. The location may be easily remembered by thinking of Africa as being like a gigantic pear, standing on its apex, having a huge angular piece cut out of the West side, and Fernando Po vainly trying to fill up the gap!

A Portuguese discovered the island in 1471 and named it after himself. His countrymen having failed to make anything of it, agreed in 1778 to an exchange by which Spain became the possessor. Owing to the heavy mortality among the Spaniards, in 1827 she ceded the country to the English who used it as an asylum for freed slaves, and as a coaling station. [Continue reading]