W. Wilson Cash’s The Changing Sudan

W. Wilson Cash, The Changing SudanThis book was written in the hope that it would encourage fresh support for missionary work in Sudan.  It is reproduced here by kind permission of the CMS.

W. Wilson Cash, The Changing Sudan, 2nd edn. London: Church Missionary Society, 1931. Pbk. pp.88. Download in PDF.

Contents

1 – The Sudan Exploited
2 – The Sudan Liberated
3 – The New Sudan
4 – Open Doors in the North
5 – An Heroic Adventure
6 – Pagan Tribes and the Gospel
7 – Building For the Future

Foreword

In January, 1929, I was privileged to visit once more the Northern Sudan, in order to confer with the missionaries and government officials on the future policy of the Church Missionary Society work in the Sudan.

The visit was a brief but very busy one, and as a result of it certain important decisions were made by the C.M.S. for the future development of the two missions in the northern and southern areas.

I should like to take this opportunity of expressing my deep gratitude to the Governor-General, Sir John Maffey, to J. G. Matthew, Esq., Secretary for Education, Health, etc., in the Sudan Government, and to the many officials all of whom from the day of my arrival to the time I left the Sudan showed me such generous hospitality, friendship, and kindness, and to whose ready help any success that attended my work was largely due.

I also wish to record my deep appreciation to the missionaries who gave me such loyal and wholehearted co-operation in my efforts. Their work is beyond praise ; and I came away with an impression of profound thankfulness for the great service they are rendering to the Kingdom of God.

I cannot close this Foreword without recording the special service rendered by Bishop Gwynne as chairman of our conferences, Dr. Lasbrey, the then secretary of the Egypt and Northern Sudan Mission, and Bishop Kitching and Archdeacon Shaw, both of whom travelled over a thousand miles to join in the discussions and who brought to our problems expert knowledge and advice. [Continue reading]