Fanny Jane Butler – Pioneer Medical Missionary to India

E.M. Tonge, Fanny Jane Butler, Pioneer Medical MissionaryDr Fanny Jane Butler was, according to Wikipedia,

…among the first female doctors to travel to India and the first fully trained doctor from England to do so. Prior to her work in Kashmir and other parts of India, Butler was a part of the first class of the London School of Medicine for Women, becoming a member of the forefront of female doctors. Butler spent seven years in India until her death in 1889 and opened medical dispensaries in Srinagar and Bhagalpur, where no medical facilities had previously existed. Butler also initiated the building of the first hospital in Srinagar in 1888 called the John Bishop Memorial Hospital and provided necessary medical care for Indian women, for whom little care had been available.

Thanks to the kind permission of the Church Mission Society I am able to make available one of the standard biographies of this remarkable lady – kindly provided by Redcliffe College. This book is copyright Church Mission Society.

E.M. Tonge, Fanny Jane Butler, Pioneer Medical Missionary. London: Church of England Zenana Missionary Society, 1930. Pbk. pp.54. [Click to download complete book in PDF]

Contents

  • Foreword (Contributed)
  • Prologue
  1. By the Thames
  2. “Not Disobedient to the Heavenly Vision”
  3. Student Days
  4. Buying Experience
  5. By the Ganges
  6. Off the Beaten Track
  7. A Lover of Children
  8. A Stenuous Furlough
  9. By the Jhelum
  10. Overwhelming Opportunities
  11. The Last Journey Down the River
  • Epilogue (Contributed)

Foreword

It is a real honour and pleasure to contribute a brief Foreword to this most interesting sketch by E. M. Tonge of the Life and Work of the late Dr. Fanny Butler.

The whole story reads as might the life of some mediaeval saint, one of the men and women who had so dedicated themselves, their powers, and their lives to Christ’s service that they could say: “it is not I who live, but Christ Who liveth in me.”

It is perhaps an advantage that the sketch presented for the help and encouragement of a later generation of women doctors should be so restrained and so shortened. These are busy days, and it is probable that the little, unassuming” life” of a devoted woman who was at once both saint and heroine should have been cast into a form that will make but little demand on the time, but ought to make great demands on the development of her successors. [Continue reading]

 

Dawn on the Kachin Hills

C.H. Denyer, Dawn on the Kachin HillsDawn on the Kachin Hills serves both as a helpful introduction to Christian Missions in general and to the work of Bible Churchmen’s Missionary Society there. It also includes material on the work among the Naga peoples of what is now the most easterly parts of India.

My thanks to Crosslinks for their permission to place the book on-line and to Redcliffe College for providing a copy to scan. This book is copyright Crosslinks.

C.H. Denyer, Dawn on the Kachin Hills. A Brief Account of Burma and Its Peoples, and of Missionary Work among them, with Special Reference to the Races of Upper Burma and the New Mission of the Bible Churchmen’s Missionary Society. London: Bible Churchmen’s Missionary Society, 1927. Pbk. pp.112. [Click to download complete book in PDF]

Contents

  • Preface by Sir Harry Stileman
  • Foreword by the Author
  1. Burma in General. Some Geography and a Little History
  2. Rangoon, Lower Burma and the Burmans
  3. How the Gospel came to Burma
  4. The Kachin Hills and the Government
  5. The Kachins, Their Origins and Customs
  6. More about the Shans
  7. The New B.C.M.S. Work in Upper Burma
  8. The Daily Routine of a New Missionary
  • One Word More

Appendices

  1. Other Books to Read
  2. Hints for Study Circles on Burma

Sketches from the Karen Hills – Alonzo Bunker

Alonzo Bunker [1837-1912], Sketches from the Karen HillsAlonzo Bunker served for forty years among the Karen people of Burma (modern Myanmar) for the American Baptist Missionary Union. In this book he shares from his wealth of experience. My thanks to Redcliffe College for providing a copy of this book to digitise. This title is in the public domain.

Alonzo Bunker [1837-1912], Sketches from the Karen Hills. New York: Fleming H. Revell Company, 1910. Hbk. pp.215. [Click to download complete book in PDF]

Contents

  1. Exploration of Loikaw Mission
  2. Exploration Continued
  3. Founding Loikaw Mission
  4. The First Christmas in Loikaw Mission
  5. Stories of Karen Child-Life
  6. K’surdo
  7. Encounter with Wild Beasts and Serpents
  8. Story of the Yahdo Chapel
  9. Thirteen Witches
  10. Perils and Pleasures
  11. The Miracle of Senite
  12. Provindential Care
  13. The Magic Doughnut
  14. A Notable Missionary Journey
  15. The Gospel and the Savage Bercs
  16. How We Captured the Myaangyoung Pongyi

Introduction

Every person who is interested in the triumphs of the gospel, and in the often thrilling experiences of the men who, in obedience to a Divine call, are giving their lives to make it known to the unenlightened and barbarous peoples of the East, will welcome this small volume of missionary sketches from the pen of Rev. Dr. Alonzo Bunker, who for forty years has been an honoured and successful representative in Burma of the American Baptist Missionary Union. This new volume will be especially welcome to those who have read with delight and profit “Soo Thah,” a book by the same author, published a few years since, and for which there is still a large demand by the reading public.

Dr. Bunker has been emphatically a pioneer missionary. The work to which he was assigned necessitated long and difficult journeys over vast mountainous regions, infested by wild beasts and untraversed by the feet of white men, to reach tribes of men grossly ignorant, and hardly less wild than their untamed neighbours of the forest. [Continue reading]

Biography and Letters of Dixon Edward Hoste [1861-1946]

Phyllis Thompson [1906- ], D.E. Hoste. "A Prince with God". Hudson Taylor's Successor as general Director of the China Inland MissionDixon Edward Hoste (23 July 1861 – 11 May 1946) was Hudson’s Taylor’s successor as General Director of the China Inland Mission. This book provides us with a a biography and a selection of his letters. My thanks to OMF International UK for their kind permission to place this book on-line and to Redcliffe College for providing a copy of the book to scan. You can read a brief summary of D.E. Hoste’s life on Wikipedia.

Phyllis Thompson [1906- ], D.E. Hoste. “A Prince with God”. Hudson Taylor’s Successor as general Director of the China Inland Mission. London: China Inland Mission, [1947]. Hbk. pp.222. View in PDF format pdf [Click to download complete book in PDF]

Contents

Foreword
Preface

Biography

  • Early Years
  • The Cambridge Seven
  • First Impressions
  • Hungtung
  • Preparation of a Leader
  • Marriage and Furlough
  • Leader of the Mission
  • Building on the Foundations
  • Spiritual Leadership
  • The Man Himself
  • The Forward Movement
  • The which Remained

Extracts from Letters

Spiritual Leadership
Qualifications for Leadership
Conditions of True Success
Preparation for Leadership
Towards Unity
The Oracles of God
The One Thign Needful
True Humility
“He Humbled Himself”
The Secret of Submission
Self-Discipline
Love Worked Out in Daily Life
Widening Love
To All Men

Foreword

No one who is separated to the Gospel of God as D. E. Hoste was can fail to profit by the reading of this book. He was chosen to be leader in the work of the China Inland Mission because he had served the people of China and his fellow missionaries in a spirit of love, humility and self-discipline. Writing to Hudson Taylor from Shansi after less than a year in China, he asks prayer for help in language study and in getting to know the people. “More .and more I see,” he says, “that there will be need of much love and forbearance and willingness to be the inferior, if one is really to get across the gulf there is between us.” By God’s grace, these qualities were manifest in his life and so he succeeded in bridging the gulf. [Continue reading]

God’s Deliverance from the Boxer Uprising

Alexander R. Saunders, A God of Deliverances. The Story of the Marvellous Deliverances Through the Sovereign Power of God of a Party of Missionaries, When Compelled by the Boxer Rising to Flee From Shan-Si, North ChinaThe Boxer Uprising (a.k.a. the Yihequan Movement) of 1899-1901 was  one to the darkest  hours for missionaries in China. This little book recounts how some of the China Inland Mission workers were able to escape the hands of the Boxers. My thanks to OMF International-UK for their kind permission to place this book on-line and to Redcliffe College for providing a copy to scan. This title is copyright OMF International-UK.

Alexander R. Saunders, A God of Deliverances. The Story of the Marvellous Deliverances Through the Sovereign Power of God of a Party of Missionaries, When Compelled by the Boxer Rising to Flee From Shan-Si, North China. London: China Inland Mission, [1901]. Hbk. pp.88. [Click to download complete book in PDF]

Contents

  • Preface by Rev J. Hudson Taylor, M.R.C.S., F.R.G.S.
  1. Before the Riot
  2. The Flight to the Yamen
  3. Within a Step of Death
  4. Our Second Riot
  5. A Spectacle to Men and to Angels
  6. Prisoners of the Lord
  7. Two Martyrs
  8. Wonders at the Yellow River
  9. Sorrow Upon Sorrow
  10. Safe Home at Last

Chapter 1 0 – Before the riot

”Beloved, think it not strange concerning the fiery trial which is to try you.”-1 Peter iv. 12.

The city of P’ing-yao was opened as a station by the China Inland Mission in 1888. Being the banking centre for China, its position is important, and it subsequently became the business centre for the C.I.M. in Central Shan-si. During the twelve years of missionary work in this station, 133 persons have been baptized. With these Christians organised under eight separate congregations, all paying their own expenses, and in two cases with chapels mort-gaged by native contributions, and with nearly 100 candidates waiting for baptism, the Lord’s work had never seemed more encouraging than just prior to the Boxer rising.

In consequence of information received concerning the Boxer troubles in Shan-tong, I was led, during the earlier part of the year, to speak much to the Christians on the subject of persecution and affliction for Christ’s sake, and one cannot but praise God for having been led so to do. [Continue reading]

Garenganze – or Seven Years Pioneer Mission Work in Central Africa

Frederick Stanley Arnot [1858-1914], Garenganze; or, Seven Years Pioneer Mission Work in Central Africa, 3rd edn.Frederick Stanley Arnot [1858-1914] is remembered for his pioneering missionary work in Angola, Zambia, and in the Democratic Republic of Congo among the Garenganze people. He also did much during his furloughs in England both to recruit new workers and to ensure their support. My thanks to Redcliffe College for providing me with a copy of the book to scan. This title is in the public domain.

Frederick Stanley Arnot [1858-1914], Garenganze; or, Seven Years Pioneer Mission Work in Central Africa, 3rd edn. London: James E. Hawkins, [1889]. Hbk. pp.276. [Click to download complete book in PDF]

Contents

Preface
Introduction by A.T. Pierson, of Philadelphia

  1. On the Way to the Zambesi
  2. Among the Barotze
  3. From the Zambesi to Benguella
  4. From Benguella to Garenganze
  5. Stay at Garenhanze
  6. The Garenganze Kingdom and People
  7. Return Journey

Appendix

Mr Arnot’s Fellow-laborers
M. Coillard’s Labours in the Barotse Valley
Lake Bangweolo and Surrounding Country –
Dr. Livingstone’s Description
M. Giraud’s

Map of West Central Africa

Introduction by A.T. Pierson

This story of seven years of pioneer mission work in the heart of the Dark Continent is another fulfilment of that sagacious prediction of Victor Hugo, that in the twentieth century Africa is to be the cynosure of all eyes.

Mr. Arnot has given us no ambitious narrative. It is, in the etymological sense, homely, for it is a son’s letter to his mother and the home group; and it is a story of strictly pioneer work, for he undertook to cross the continent on foot. The journey, undertaken in an apostolic spirit, was marked by that savour of the supernatural which is so sweet to a believer; as when, for example, in a terrible thunderstorm, an electric ball fell crashing at his feet with the sound and shock of a cannon’s shot, and yet left him unharmed; or, as when, in repeated instances, food and water were found to relieve extreme hunger and thirst just at the crisis when the believing prayer had been offered. [Continue reading]

First Twelve Years of BCMS Burma Mission

A.T. Houghton [1896-1993], Dense Jungle Green. The First Twelve Years of the B.C.M.S. Burma MissionThis is an account of the beginnings of the Bible Churchmen’s Missionary Society (B.C.M.S.) work in Burma. B.C.M.S. became Crosslinks in 1992. My thanks to Crosslinks and to Rev. A.T. Houghton’s family for their kind  permission to place this book on-line, and to Redcliffe College for providing a copy to scan. This book is copyright Crosslinks.

A.T. Houghton [1896-1993], Dense Jungle Green. The First Twelve Years of the B.C.M.S. Burma Mission. London: Bible Churchmen’s Missionary Society, 1937. Hbk. pp.255. [Click to download complete book in PDF]

Contents

Foreword
Author’s Notes
Prologue

  1. How it Came About
  2. History and Geography
  3. The Progress of the Pioneers
  4. Early Days
  5. Mountain and Plain
  6. Problems of Race and Language
  7. A Courageous Couple
  8. We Tackle Other Races
  9. The Town of the Ogre
  10. Advancing Northwards
  11. By the Lakeside
  12. Interlude, and a Venture in Reorganisation
  13. Gains and Losses
  14. A Notorious Slave Centre
  15. The Source of the World’s Jade
  16. A New Venture by the Sea
  17. “The Place Where the Tiger Roared”
  18. How We Get About
  19. How We Live
  20. Living Epistles
  21. Our Bit
  22. “We Have Left Undone”

Epilogue
Roll of Missionaries
Bibliography

Foreword By Rear-Admiral Sir Harry H. Stileman, K.B.E.

I accept with pleasure the invitation of the author of Dense Jungle Green to write this Foreword, seeing I  have a very close and intimate touch with the B.C.M.S. Mission in Burma, through the link of family ties, and personal acquaintance with every member of the mission staff, except my grand-daughter, born in the Hukawng valley last autumn.

I have watched the growth and development of the mission with prayerful interest and attention ever since its inception, and rejoice in the remarkable results attained.

The method of pure evangelism in contradistinction to excessive institutionalism is the plan upon which this Mission has worked: every missionary first and foremost an evangelist; and, coupled with that, an absolute reliance upon the Word of God to do the work that the Holy Spirit intends, of convicting and converting. [Continue reading]

William Carey Pioneer Missionary to India’s Millions

John Brown Myers [1844/45-1915], William Carey. The Shoemaker Who Became "The Father and Founder of Modern Missions"John Brown Myers [1844/45-1915] provides us with a brief biography of William Carey – “The Founder of Modern Missions”. The book includes chapters on Carey’s role as a translator, a philanthropist and a naturalist. My thanks to Redcliffe College for providing me with a copy to digitise. This book is in the public domain.

John Brown Myers [1844/45-1915], William Carey. The Shoemaker Who Became “The Father and Founder of Modern Missions”. Kilmarnock: John Ritchie, [1905]. Hbk. pp.151. [Click to download complete book in PDF]

Contents

Preface

  1. His Early Years
  2. His Life at Moulton and Leicester
  3. He Offers Himself as a Missionary, and Starts for India
  4. First Experiences
  5. Removal to Serampore
  6. The Serampore Mode of Life
  7. Three Important Events
  8. Various Circumstances
  9. Carey as a Translator
  10. Carey as a Philanthropist
  11. Carey as a Naturalist
  12. Carey and Serampore College
  13. Conclusion

Chapter 1: The Early Years

If Thomas Fuller, the author of the “Worthies of England,” himself a Northamptonshire man, had died a century after instead of exactly a century before William Carey was born, he might have written a work restricted to the worthies of his own county, and to those two hundred years, as voluminous and interesting as his well-known folio. From Dryden, whose birthplace, like his own, was the village of Aldwinkle, down to John Clare, who may be regarded as the English Robert Burns, how many celebrities, and that not alone of poet fame, would have received biographical notice! The dwellers in the midland shire may well be proud of the eminent men who have been born upon its soil. [Continue reading]

Primitive Methodism on the Island of Fernando Po

Nathaniel Boocock [1860-1944], Our Fernandian MissionsFernando Po (now called Bioko) is an island located off the coast of Cameroon in West Africa which form s the most northerly territory of the nation of Equatorial Guinea. Nathaniel Boocock’s book tells the story of mission work under taken there up to 1912 under the auspices of Primitive Methodist African Missions. My thanks to Redcliffe College for providing me with a copy of this volume to digitise. This book is in the public domain.

Nathaniel Boocock [1860-1944], Our Fernandian Missions. London: W.A. Hammond, 1912. Hbk. pp.96.[Click to download complete book in PDF]

Contents

Preface

  1. Fernando Po
  2. The People
  3. Santa Isabel
  4. San Carlos
  5. Banni
  6. Bottler Point
  7. “As Other See Us”

Chapter 1

Fernando Po is an island 46 miles in length and 26 miles in breadth, and is situated in the Gulf of Guinea, 24 miles from the main-land. It consists of a huge mountain adorned with beautiful palms. The peak of this mountain towers over 10,000 feet above the sea level. Its grandeur can hardly be surpassed, especially when the setting sun plays upon the precipitous ravines, the outcome of volcanic outbursts. Lying between 3 and 4 degrees North latitude and 8 and 9 degrees East longitude, its position near the equator accounts for its notorious unhealthiness. The location may be easily remembered by thinking of Africa as being like a gigantic pear, standing on its apex, having a huge angular piece cut out of the West side, and Fernando Po vainly trying to fill up the gap!

A Portuguese discovered the island in 1471 and named it after himself. His countrymen having failed to make anything of it, agreed in 1778 to an exchange by which Spain became the possessor. Owing to the heavy mortality among the Spaniards, in 1827 she ceded the country to the English who used it as an asylum for freed slaves, and as a coaling station. [Continue reading]

Sarah Hall (Boardman) Judson’s Biography

Emily Chubbock [1818-1854] (pen-name Fanny Forester)
Photograph public domain. Source: Wikipedia
Sarah Hall married George Boardman in 1824, a week before departing for Burma as missionaries. George died in 1831 and Sarah married fellow missionary Adoniram Judson [1788-1850] three years later. Following her death in 1844 Judson returned to the US where he commissioned the novelist Emily Chubbock [1818-1854] (pen-name Fanny Forester) to write Sarah’s biography. Judson subsequently married Emily and they returned to Burma together.

My thanks to Redcliffe College for providing a copy of this book for digitisation. This work is in public domain.

Fanny Forester (a.k.a. Emily Chubbock Judson), Memoir of Sarah B. Judson, Member of the Mission to Burmah. London: Aylott & Jones, 1849. pp.179. [Click to download complete book in PDF]

Contents

Introductory Notice
Preface

  1. Early Days
  2. A New Life
  3. The Consecration
  4. Contrasts
  5. Maulmain
  6. Tavoy
  7. Little Sarah
  8. The Revolt
  9. Withering and Watching
  10. “Death in the Jungle”
  11. The Female Missionary
  12. A New Home
  13. The Mother and Child
  14. Trial on Trial
  15. The Christian’s Death

Introductory Notice

The authoress of this beautiful biographical production is now labouring as a missionary in the Burman Empire. She has succeeded to the toils, as well as to the sacred relations, of the lady whose sufferings and labours for Christ she has so graphically depicted.

Under the graceful pseudonyme of Fanny Forester, Miss Emily C. Chubbuck has for some years held a high place amid the literary circles of America. She is a native of the State of New York. Highly educated and accomplished, her first productions were written while a teacher in a female seminary in Utica, and at once attracted attention and admiration. Early in 1844, while on a visit to the city of New York, she became a contributor to the pages of the New York Mirror. The sketches, essays, and poems which appeared in its pages, were, two a years afterwards, when she was on the eve of sailing for Burmah, reprinted under the title of ‘Alderbrooke.’

On his return to America in 1846, after laying to rest his beloved partner and companion, the subject of this memoir, on the rocky isle of St. Helena, Dr. Judson sought out Miss Chubbuck, then at Philadelphia for her heath, to request the employment of her pen on the narrative of the life’s history of Mrs. Judson.  [Continue reading]