Three Closed Lands: China, Bhutan and Nepal

John Anderson Graham [1861-1942], On the Threshold of Three Closed Lands. The Guild Outpost in the Western Himalayas
The “Three Closed Lands” are China, Bhutan & Nepal
This is an account of the Eastern Himalayan Mission of the Church of Scotland written in 1897. It was located near the borders of three countries which foreign missionaries were not allowed to enter – China, Bhutan and Nepal. Its 178 pages contain no less than 132 illustrations!

My thanks to Redcliffe College for providing me with a copy to digitise. This title is in the public domain.

John Anderson Graham [1861-1942], On the Threshold of Three Closed Lands. The Guild Outpost in the Western Himalayas, 2nd edn. Edinburgh: R & R Clark, Ltd. / London: A & C Black, 1897. Pbk. pp.178. [Click to download complete book in PDF]

Contents

  • Preface to Second Edition
  • Introduction
  1. The Way Thither
  2. From the Church Tower
  3. The Village
  4. God’s Acre
  5. The Memorial Church
  6. The Ministry of Healing
  7. Teaching
  8. The Hill Crofters
  9. Among the Tea Gardens
  10. A Himalayan Parish
  11. The Care of the Churches
  12. Handing the Torch
  13. Holding the Ropes
  14. The St. Andrew’s Colonial Homes

Introduction

This brightly written account of one of the most interesting and prosperous Missions in India needs no introduction for the benefit of those for whom it is principally intended-the members of the Congregations, Associations, Branches, and Guilds scattered through-out the country, who are already acquainted with the work, who perhaps already support it with their contributions, or have helped to send out some of the workers, and whose warmer interest and more active assistance will be called out by a perusal of this vivid narrative.  [Continue reading]

Story of the London Missionary Society in the South Seas

George Cousins [1842-?], The Story of the South SeasThe work of the London Missionary Society in the Pacific Ocean through its “Missionary Ships” is truly inspiring. In this heavily illustrated book George Cousins (editorial Assistant and Assistant Foreign Secretary of the London Missionary Society) draws on a number of sources to retell the story. My thanks to Redcliffe College for providing a copy of the book for scanning. This title is in the public domain.

George Cousins [1842-?], The Story of the South Seas. London: London Missionary Society, 1894. Hbk. pp.246. [Click to download complete book in PDF]

Contents

  1. The Good Ship “Duff” and Her Strange Cargo
  2. “The Night of Toil”
  3. The Overthrow of Idolatry
  4. Spreading Out
  5. Carrying the Light to Other Groups
  6. The “Messenger of Peace” and Her Useful Work
  7. The Martyred Missionary Polynesia
  8. Further Extension
  9. Teaching and Training Heathen Converts
  10. Joining Hands to Save New Guinea
  11. Summing Up, or Work and Workers in the Older Stations
  12. Other Labourers in the Southern Ocean

Preface

This book is the outcome of the revived interest in the South Seas which the effort to build the steamer John William’s has created. In reading old books descriptive of the early days of the mission I came across so many striking facts unknown to the present generation that a desire to put these facts together in a short connected story grew strong within me.

The first few pages repeat what appears in the opening chapter of “From Island to Island,” but in an altered form. The remainder is newly written. The books to which I am specially indebted are: Ellis’s “Polynesian Researches,” Williams’s “Missionary Enterprises,” Buzacott’s “Mission Life in the Pacific,” Turner’s” Nineteen Years in Polynesia,” Murray’s” Western Polynesia,” and” Forty Years’ Mission Work,” Gill’s “Gems from the Coral Islands,” Dr. Steele’s “New Hebrides and Christian Missions,” “The Night of Toil,” by the author of the “Peep of Day,” and an article entitled “Christian Work in Polynesia,” which appeared in” The Missionary Review of the World. [Continue reading]

Fifty Years in China with Griffith John

R. Wardlaw Thompson [1842-1916], Griffith John. The Story of Fifty Years in ChinaThis is R. Wardlaw Thompson’s [1842-1916] detailed account of Griffith John’s fifty years of service in China with the London Missionary Society. My thanks to Redcliffe College for providing a copy of the book for digitisation. This title is in the public domain.

R. Wardlaw Thompson [1842-1916], Griffith John. The Story of Fifty Years in China. London: The Religious Tract Society, 1908. Hbk. pp.552. [Download complete book in PDF]

This book contains a superb contemporary map of China. Click on the map below for a larger image.

Map of China

Contents

  • Preface
  1. Early Life and Training for Ministry
  2. The Great Decision and the Open Door
  3. Shanghai
  4. In Journeyings Oft
  5. The T’Ai-P-ing Rebels
  6. Hankow at Last
  7. The Power of the Preacher
  8. Development and Extension
  9. Yet Further Afield
  10. In Defence of Missions
  11. The First Furlough
  12. Growing Work and Widening Influence
  13. Evangelising by the Pen – Colportage
  14. Hiau-Kan
  15. Home Again
  16. Sorrow – Anxiety – Honour
  17. Translating the Scriptures
  18. Years of Excitement and Change
  19. Hunan
  20. New Movements and the Old Missionary
  • Index

Chapter 1. Early Life and Training For the Ministry

The life of a great missionary, who has spent many years and endured many perils in the prosecution of his great enterprise, who has become known and honoured in many circles beyond the Society with which he is most immediately connected, whose voice has been listened to and whose judgment has been respected by native leaders and British officials, cannot fail to present abundant material for interesting and profitable study. The story of his work, the expression of his opinions, the observation of his character, and the principles which have ruled his life are all of value.

To this has to be added, in the case of Griffith John, all the interest arising from the fact that he has spent the past fifty years in China. [Continue reading]

Zenana Missions Work Fuh-Kien Province, China

Mary Elizabeth Darley [c.1870-1934], The Light of the Morning. The Story of the C.E.Z.M.S. Work in the Kien-Ning Prefecture of the Fuh-Kien Province China.This is the fascinating account of the Zenana mission work of Mary Elizabeth Darley [c.1870-1934]. She served in China with the Church of England Zenana Mission Society and was supported by the Ladies’ Auxiliary of the Dublin University Fuh-Kien Mission. My thanks to Redcliffe College for providing a copy of the book to scan. This title is in the public domain.

Mary Elizabeth Darley [c.1870-1934], The Light of the Morning. The Story of the C.E.Z.M.S. Work in the Kien-Ning Prefecture of the Fuh-Kien Province China. London: Church of England Zenana Missionary Society / Marshall Brothers, 1903. Hbk. pp.251. [Download complete book in PDF]

Contents

  • Introduction
  1. First Impressions
  2. Some Village Christians
  3. The Story of Golden Sister
  4. The “Ten-Commandments Inn” Woman
  5. Summer Sketches
  6. “They are Waiting Everywhere!”
  7. An Itinerating Tour
  8. A Strange Experience
  9. Shadows Steal Across the Sky
  10. Clouds Cover the Blue
  11. “He Maketh the Storm to Cease!”
  12. A Leper, and Blind
  13. A Station Class
  14. Fields Already White
  15. Binding the Sheaves
  16. Toil and Sure Reward

One story that caught my wife’s eye as she was looking through this book was the ministry among Buddhist “prayer-women” and the account of the conversion of one of them at the age of 75.

Extract from p.141 onwards

“We have lately come in close contact with old Mrs. Ho, who for the last thirty years has been busily engaged in prayer-chanting. In the third month of last year she came to our house amongst a crowd of forty or fifty other women a tidy, clean old lady, seventy-five years old, very small, and well-behaved. I gave her tea, and she stroked my hand, and said, ‘ I cannot understand what you say with so many visitors here; may I wait till they are gone, and then you can slowly tell me about your religion?’

“Willingly I asked her to wait, and for five hours that old lady sat eagerly listening to what I was saying, and trying to understand. When the rush of visitors was over, I was able to talk to her alone for some time. She was very much interested, and, I think, was convicted of the truth on that first Sunday.

“Every week she came regularly to Church, and we could tell that a real work was going on in her heart. Then a difficulty arose. She was receiving payment for prayers she was saying for several families, and had been prepaid for the next three months. As this payment had been paid in kind, and not in cash, she did not know what to do. [Continue reading]

Susan Ballard’s Jottings from Japan

Susan Ballard [1863-1909], Jottings From Japan, 2nd ednThis is a collection of Susan Ballard’s [1863-1909] articles previously published in missionary news magazines. It is illustrated for the most part with her own photographs. My thanks to Redcliffe College for providing a copy to scan. This title is in the public domain.

Susan Ballard [1863-1909], Jottings From Japan, 2nd edn. Westminster: The Society for the Propagation of the Gospel in Foreign Parts, 1918. Hbk. pp.96. [This title is in the public domain]

Contents

  • Christian kindness
  • In a Japanese village (1)
  • In a Japanese village (2)
  • In a Japanese village (3)
  • A prisoner in Japan
  • The ‘bus boy
  • Praying for the congregation
  • The blind “Ama”
  • “As others see us”
  • A Japanese Sailor
  • Truth
  • A Japanese Easter offering
  • A meeting in a train
  • An aged Christian
  • A tea-party in Japan
  • Japan in the time of war
  • “Give peace in our time, O Lord”
  • By a Buddhist temple in Japan
  • The land of morning calm
  • What I bought with two pounds

Christian Kindness

One day my servant showed in a young man who, she said, was anxious to see me. Instead of making the customary Japanese bow, he advanced with stretched out hand, saying, “How do you do?”

By this I knew that he must have been in England, and I replied in English, but it was soon evident that his knowledge of English was limited to that one sentence.

“Please to excuse my coming to see you,” he said in Japanese. “You do not know me, though we have met once before. Two years ago, when you were visiting your native country of England, you gave an address to a large party of Japanese bluejackets who had been invited to tea at an English Soldiers’ Home. I was one of those sailors. After you spoke, some of us asked where you lived when in Japan, and you wrote down your Tokio number on some pieces of paper and distributed them among us, and I got one of them. [Continue reading]

Christian Missions in Madagascar

Edward Oliver McMahon [1860-1918], Christian Missions in MadagascarArchdeacon Edward Oliver McMahon [1860-1918] recalls the history of S.P.G. missionary work in Madagascar. There are numerous  contemporary photographs that depict various aspects of Malagasy life. My thanks to Redcliffe College for providing a copy of the book to scan. This title is in the public domain.

Edward Oliver McMahon [1860-1918], Christian Missions in Madagascar. Westminster: The Society for the Propagation of the Gospel in Foreign Parts, 1914. Hbk. pp.179. [Click to download the complete book in PDF]

Contents

  • Preface
  • Introduction
  1. Madagascar and the Malagasy
  2. The First Christian Missions in Madagascar
  3. Religious beliefs and customs
  4. Progress of Christianity
  5. The last days of Hova
  6. Missions under French rule
  7. Review of the Anglican Mission work in Madagascar
  8. Church work in the north
  9. The Malagasy way of looking at things
  10. The comity of Missions
  11. Hope, problems, and jubilee festivities
  • Bibliography
  • Index

Preface

I have been asked to write a few words to com-mend this book to all who love Mission work. It has been prepared with infinite pains by my dear friend and fellow-worker, Archdeacon McMahon.

No present member of the Mission is better qualified than he is to write an account of our work; for, with one exception, he alone re-members those early days, so interesting and romantic, before the French occupation. Many readers will regret that the old days are gone for ever, and that many interesting customs and survivals of heathenism and the peculiarities of native rule have been swept away. “The old order changeth yielding place to new.”

The book, though necessarily brief, is comprehensive; and it will be found that full justice has been done to the noble work, which has been done, and which is being done for Christ, by other societies in this island. [Continue reading]

 

1910 World Missionary Conference in Edinburgh

1910 World Missionary Conference
 Proceedings of the 1910 World Missionary Conference

According to Wikipedia:

The 1910 World Missionary Conference, or the Edinburgh Missionary Conference, was held on 14 to 23 June, 1910. Some have seen it as both the culmination of nineteenth-century Protestant Christian missions and the formal beginning of the modern Protestant Christian ecumenical movement.

The article continues:

The spirit of the Conference was driven by the watchword of the Protestant Christian Missionary community at the time: “The Evangelization of the World in This Generation.” Thus, sentiments of obligation and urgency drove many of the commission reports, discussions and speeches at the Conference. A call to unity among Protestant missionaries was also a common desire expressed at the Conference, although no common liturgy was celebrated among the delegates while in Edinburgh. In his 1947 book What Must the Church Do?, Robert S. Bilheimer used the phrase “New Reformation” to refer to the ecumenical movement that resulted from the conference, and this usage became commonplace thereafter.

Thanks to the Cambridge Centre for Christianity Worldwide, I am able to make available the eight volumes of Reports from the Conference. The ninth volume contains the proceedings and public addresses given at the Conference. These may well prove the most interesting to modern readers as they contain a snapshot of the progress of evangelisation around the world. The copyright for these articles is more complex, but on checking all but a few have proved to be public domain. I have also included a rare article from the The Quiver written prior to the Conference and an assessment of its significance written by Church historian Harold Rowden in 1967.

Click here to visit the Edinburgh 1910 World Missionary Conference resource page

You will find the papers from the 2010 Edinburgh Conference here.

Glimpses of Christian India with Ella Luce

Ella Luce [1860-1943], Glimpses of Christian IndiaElla Luce [1860-1943] vividly recalls her long service in India with the Zenana Medical mission extending from 1888-1922. My thanks to Redcliffe College for providing a copy of the book to scan. This title is in the public domain.

Ella Luce [1860-1943], Glimpses of Christian India. London & Edinburgh: Marshall, Morgan & Scott, [1933]. Hbk. pp.216. [Click to download complete book in PDF]

Contents

  1. Earliest Recollections
  2. School and Life in London
  3. Mission and Conversion
  4. Voyage to India, and the First Year There
  5. Beginning Work at Sultanpur
  6. Work at Sultanpur – and Marriages of My Sisters
  7. Building the First Orphanage, and Famine of 1897
  8. Accounts of Some Girls Saved in the Famine
  9. Missionary Friends and Expansion of the Work
  10. Building the Hospital, and Plague in Cawmpore
  11. A Difficult Girl and a Serious Illness
  12. Weddings and Consumption
  13. Building Large New Dormitories For 100 Children

Part Two: Tours in India After Retirement

  • First Tour After Retirement
  • Second Tour After Retirement
  • Deputation Tours in England and Closing Work in Sultanpur

Chapter 1: Earliest Recollections

How or by whom I was informed I cannot say, but I know somehow that my father was sitting by a fire at twelve o’clock on the night of July seventh, eighteen hundred and sixty, when a nurse appeared and told him that another daughter had been born to him. This was a disappointment, as he had naturally hoped that his second offspring would be a son.

The old house looking more or less like a large farm house covered with many creepers, had a long narrow hall with drawing-room and dining-room on each side, a study with steps leading to the garden, six fairly large bedrooms, two dressing-rooms and an upper storey containing several rooms used by the servants… [Continue reading]

William Paton’s Case for Christian World Mission

William Paton [1886-1943], A Faith For the WorldWilliam Paton [1886-1943] sets out the argument for world mission. It is based on the material presented at the Jerusalem meeting of the International Missionary Council (March 24th – April 8th 1928). My thanks to Redcliffe College for providing a copy of the book to scan. This title is in the public domain.

William Paton [1886-1943], A Faith For the World. Westminster: The Livingstone Press, 1929. Hbk. pp.256. [Click to download complete book in PDF]

Contents

  • Preface
  • Introductory Chapter. The Challenge of World Mission
  1. God and Man
  2. The Search For Power
  3. “Lord and Christ”
  4. The Divine Community
  5. The Testimony of Jesus
  6. Teaching the Nations
  7. “Field, Factory and Workshop”
  8. “Sirs, Ye are Brethren”
  9. The Conclusion of the Whole Matter
  • Bibliography
    Index

Preface

The purpose of this book may be briefly stated. It is to set out the main elements of the case for the Christian world mission, and to show some of the principal tasks which are bound up with that mission. The book owes everything to the Jerusalem meeting of the International Missionary Council, and could not have been written without it, but it is not directly concerned with that meeting. It seeks, rather, to draw attention to some of the principles which must be accepted and to some of the necessities which must be met if the generous enthusiasms stirred up by the Jerusalem meeting are to bear fruit….

I have drawn heavily upon the ample resources of the complete Report of the Jerusalem meeting, and hope that to some readers this book may serve as an incentive to explore the wealth of material contained there. [Continue Reading]

Four Thousand Miles Through Central Africa for the Bible

William John Waterman Roome [1865-1937], Through Central Africa for the Bible

This is an account of a four thousand mile motor tour of central Africa on behalf of the British and Foreign Bible Society c. 1934. My thanks to Redcliffe College for providing a copy of the book for scanning. This title is in the public domain.

William John Waterman Roome [1865-1937], Through Central Africa for the Bible. London & Edinburgh: Marshall, Morgan & Scott, Ltd., [1929]. Hbk. pp.208. [Click to download complete book in PDF]

Contents

  • Foreword
  1. Uganda and the Congo
  2. In the Pigmy Forest
  3. Through the Eastern Highlands of the Congo
  4. Peace After War!
  5. Into the Sudan For the Consideration of Babel
  6. Back to the Congo
  7. Amongst the Wild Azande
  8. On to Stanleyville Through the Forest
  9. Yakusa on the Congo
  10. Forging the Chain!
  11. Back to the Forest
  12. To Gombari and on to Kampala
  13. The King’s Business
  14. Spreading the Word of Life

Foreword

This is just a story! It is not a history, or a survey! It is the “Log of· the Lingua,” the Bible Society’s motor that tours East and Central Africa. The story may give more of the sunshine than the shadow of missionary life, but is it not the joy after pain that gives the urge, the inspiration, the vision that carries the missionary on through the gross darkness of heathenism, and that more subtle darkness that comes from the impact of our – so – called – Western civilisation? That civilisation may have a refined centre. It has a very rough circumference. Africa is feeling that roughness in its intensity.

May this story from Central Africa kindle some thoughts of this wonderful land and its people around the firesides of those homelands where the delights of the African sun are only an imagination, or perhaps a memory! [Continue reading]

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