Missionary Work of Jennie Fuller in Akola and Bombay

Helen S. Dyer, A Life for God in India. Memorials of Mrs Jennie Fuller of Akola and BombayJennie Fuller (nee Frow) [1851-1900] was an American missionary with the Christian and Missionary Alliance in India. This book is the standard biography of her life and work. My thanks to Redcliffe College for providing a copy of the book to scan. This title is in the public domain.

Helen S. Dyer, A Life for God in India. Memorials of Mrs Jennie Fuller of Akola and Bombay. New York: Fleming H. Revell, [1903]. Hbk. pp.190. [Click to download complete book in PDF]

Contents

Introductory

  1. Links in a Chain of Blessing
  2. Called and Qualified For a Missionary Career
  3. Steps in Faith and Answers to Prayer
  4. Miss Frow Becomes Mrs Fuller
  5. Busy Years in Akola
  6. A Widening Sphere
  7. Extension and Language Difficulties
  8. The Burden of the Lord. More Prayer for Missions
  9. Travel and Bereavement
  10. The Time of India’s Trouble
  11. Literary Work in America and India
  12. Through Dark Days to Everlasting Life

Appendix

  1. Testimonies From Far and Near
  2. From Missionaries of the Christian Alliance
  3. In Memoriam
  4. Covenant Promises to Parents

Introductory

This little book does not claim to be a biography. It is but a simple attempt to gather up the threads of a life lived for God, and to show how He glorified Himself thereby. It claims to show how a life offered, consecrated, and accepted for the King’s service, fitted into His plans for mission work in India, and became a factor in the extension of the knowledge of God over an entire province. It claims to show also how God used this life to edify and extend His Church on earth, and to lift individual Christian souls into higher aims of service; to inspire the home churches with missionary zeal, and rouse them to a sense of their responsibility in regard to prayer for missions.

Our subject, Mrs Jennie Fuller, was a living, loving personality, who gave out to others as freely as God gave to her. In discussing a missionary biography with a literary friend a few weeks before the close of her life on earth, Mrs Fuller remarked,” No one can write a biography of me when I am gone. [Continue reading]

Sketches of Children’s Lives in Northern Nigeria

A.M. Locke, The Stable Door. Sketches of Child Life in Northern Nigeria.This little book was written to provide an insight into the work of the Church Missionary Society among children in Northern Nigeria. My thanks to Redcliffe College for providing me with a copy of the book to scan and to the Church Mission Society for their permission to place it on-line.

A.M. Locke, The Stable Door. Sketches of Child Life in Northern Nigeria. London: Church Missionary Society, [1935]. Hbk. pp.74. [Click to download the complete book in PDF]

Contents

  • Foreword
  • Introduction
  1. The Road to “Bethlehem”
  2. The Children Who Come
  3. How Some of Them Came
  4. Of “Bethlehem” Itself
  5. The Day’s Work
  6. “Bethlehem’s” Fields
  7. Increasing in Stature
  8. Growing in Humour and Understanding
  9. Growing Pains
  10. A New Birthday
  11. What Will They Become?
  12. “Immanuel… God With Us?”

Foreword

Most people at home know that there are a large number of missionaries of various denominations working in Africa, and that a good deal of mission man-power is concentrated upon schools. It may be that some people think that too much time and energy are devoted to this side of the work, and that more ground could be covered if missionaries confined themselves to evangelization. Those who are of that way of thinking should be convinced by reading this little book that the school, and especially the boarding school which starts with quite small children, is the most effective instrument which the missionaries possess if they wish their work to be lasting.

It is not easy to write about a school in any country; the daily round appears so trivial, and nothing really thrilling ever happens in a well-organized school. Miss Locke’s little sketches, however, of the kindergarten section of the C.M.S. school at Zaria give the reader real insight into the daily life of her little community, and into the thoughts and actions of her young charges.

Incidentally he will see for himself that she is obviously the right sort of person to be in charge of it, so full is she of understanding, kindliness, and humour.

Miss Locke’s book is attractively illustrated and will, I am sure, appeal to a variety of readers. [Continue Reading]

Campbell N. Moody’s Missionary Work in Formosa (Taiwan)

Campbell N. Moody [1866-1940], The Heathen Heart. An Account of the Reception of the Gospel Among the Chinese of FormosaCampbell Naismith Moody [1866-1940] was a scholarly and extremely successful missionary to Formosa (modern day Taiwan). In this book he tells the story of the early years of his work in that country. My thanks to Redcliffe College for providing me with a copy of this book to digitise.

Campbell N. Moody [1866-1940], The Heathen Heart. An Account of the Reception of the Gospel Among the Chinese of Formosa. Edinburgh & London: Oliphant, Anderson & Ferrier, 1907. Hbk. pp.253. [Click to download the complete book in PDF]

Contents

  1. Formosa Under the Rule of Japan
  2. The Character and Conduct of a Heathen People
  3. The Religion of a Heathen People
  4. Christ Crossing the Threshold of the Heathen Heart
  5. Some Chinese Christians: The Story of Brown-Horse Wood
  6. Some Chinese Christians (Continued)
  7. The Difficulties of Missionary Life
  8. Why Missionaries are Uninteresting
  9. The Scarcity of Missionary Workers

Chapter 1: Formosa Under the Rule of Japan

Descriptions of Formosa may be found else-where, and a very short account is quite enough for our present aim. The island, which is reckoned 264 miles long and So miles broad at the broadest, lies partly north and partly south of the Tropic of Cancer, and for six or seven months the climate is similar to that of Singapore, while the remaining portion of the year is somewhat cooler. February, the coldest month, has a mean temperature equal to that of July in Scotland. Formosa is part of the chain of islands that girds the east coast of Asia, forming a link between Japan and the Philippine Islands; and it emphasizes its connection with Japan by the frequent earthquakes with which it is disturbed. [Continue reading]

Story of Regions Beyond Missionary Union

Harry Guinness [1835-1910], These Thirty Years. The Story of the R.B.M.U.The Regions Beyond Missionary Union was founded by Henry Grattan Guinness and his wife Fanny in 1873. Its thousands of workers served in South America, Central Africa, India, Nepal and Irian Jaya. This book by the founder of the mission tells the story of the first 30 years.

My thanks to Redcliffe College for providing a copy of the book to scan. This title is in the public domain.

Harry Guinness [1835-1910], These Thirty Years. The Story of the R.B.M.U. London: The Regions Beyond Missionary Union, 1903. Hbk. pp.106. [Click to download complete book in PDF]

Contents

  • Preface
  • These Thirty Years
  • The Child Grew
  • Our Training Institutions
  • The Congo Balolo Mission
  • How Much Longer
  • At Work in the Neglected Continent
  • The Scorn of Job
  • Piercing the Darkness of Peru
  • The Quichua’s Appeal
  • Amongst India’s Millions
  • Our Helpers
  • Strengthening the Stakes
  • A Harley College Group
  • How the Money Comes
  • Our Deputation Secretaries
  • Our Children’s Home
  • The Sleeping Sickness; or, Negro Lethargy
  • Vigilante

Preface

The warm appreciation elicited by the earlier edition of “These Thirty “Years,” has encouraged us to conserve in permanent form this special issue of ” Regions Beyond.” A few emendations and improvements have been effected, and an important supplementary chapter added. Our readers will find that instead of a formal report for 1902, we compiled an illustrated survey of the entire work of the R.B.M.U. Our only regret was that lack of space compelled us to omit all reference to the noble efforts of the men and women who have gone forth from our midst to become identified with other Missionary societies, and in some instances to establish Independent Missions in hitherto unreached spheres.

The record was sent forth with the earnest prayer that it might stimulate a deeper interest in the Missions identified with Harley House, and we gratefully acknowledge the kindness and sympathy with which it has been received. Those who still desire to help us can render effective service by introducing this volume to Christian people who may not be acquainted with the work. We shall greatly appreciate any such effort to widen our circle of helpers. [Continue reading]

Further information about R.B.M.U. can be found on the Mundus website.

Henry Grattan Guinness’s 21 Years of Missionary Endeavour

Henry Grattan Guinness, "Not Unto Us"Henry Grattan Guinness [1835-1910] was one of the most influential figures in 19th Century missions. According to the Evangelical Dictionary of World Missions:

After visiting France in 1865, Guinness founded the McAll Mission. In 1873, he opened the East London Institute for Home and Foreign Missions at Harley House. Guinness’s influence also led to the founding of the North Africa Mission in 1881 and the Livingstone Inland Mission in 1887, which began in the Congo and expanded to South America and North India, eventually becoming part of the Regions Beyond Missionary Union in 1889. [p.420]

In this book Henry Guinness tells the story of his own 21 years of tireless missionary service. My thanks to Redcliffe College for providing copies of these books for digitisation. This title is in the public domain.

Henry Grattan Guinness [1835-1910], “Not Unto Us:” A Record of Twenty-One Years of Missionary Service. London: Regions Beyond Missionary Union, 1908. Hbk. pp.194. [Click to download complete book in PDF]

Introduction

Since this book may fall into the hands of many who are unacquainted with the origin of the work to which we have devoted the last twenty-one years, I venture to give in this introductory chapter a few historical paragraphs.

Its beloved founder, whose excellent portrait, taken at Brisbane, is reproduced as our frontispiece, looks back not merely on twenty-one years of contact with student life, but on twice that period. Exactly twenty-one years before 1887, when in the midst of his evangelistic labours, he established a class for young men in the city of Dublin with the object of studying with them, Paley’s Horae Paulinae. As it turned out, this class foreshadowed the Institute yet to be, and among the Irish students of those days were two young men destined to occupy important spheres of service-Thomas -J. Barnardo and John McCarthy, subsequently of the China Inland Mission. [Continue reading]

Those interested in reading more about the Guinness family can find a bibliography of Henry Grattan Guinness here, the works of his daughter Lucy Evangeline here and his Son-on-Law, Hermann Karl Wilhelm Kumm here.

William Pierce on the Claims of Foreign Missions

William Pierce [1853-1928], The Dominion of Christ. The Claims of Foreign Missions in the Light of Modern Religious Thought and a Century of ExperienceWilliam Pierce [1853-1928] offers some encouraging observations on missions on the occasion of the Centenary of the London Missionary Society. My thanks to Redcliffe College for providing a copy of the book for scanning. This title is in the public domain.

William Pierce [1853-1928], The Dominion of Christ. The Claims of Foreign Missions in the Light of Modern Religious Thought and a Century of Experience. London: H.R. Allenson, 1895. Pbk. pp.226. [Click to download complete book in PDF]

Contents

  1. The Dominion of Christ
  2. Patriotisn and Missions
  3. The Saviour of the World
  4. The Vocation of the Missionary
  5. Women as Missionaries
  6. The Beckoning Vision
  7. The Place of Education as a Missionary Agency
  8. The Relation of the Church to the Work of Foreign Missions
  9. Foreign Missions and Christian Life and Thought
  10. Physician and Evangelist
  11. Forward!

Preface

The following discourses have been published as a contribution to the Centenary Celebrations of the London Missionary Society. It need hardly be said that they claim no official authority. The views offered on some moot points presume to be no more than those of an independent observer. But they are avowedly presented as the thoughts of one whose love for the work of the L. M. S., and reverence for its missionaries and workers, is too deep for public utterance in a printed page. Offered primarily for the kind consideration of the ministers and members of the Congregational Churches, it is hoped that the body of the work may supply some arguments and reflections which shall stimulate and encourage all who love the appearing of the Lord, and are striving to extend His dominion in the earth. [Continue reading]

Thomas Birch Freeman, Son of an African

F. Deaville Walker [1878-1945], Thomas Birch Freeman. The Son of an AfricanThomas Birch Freeman [1806-1890] was a English Wesleyan Missionary to the Gold Coast of West Africa (Modern Benin, Ghana, Toga and Western Nigeria). His father was African and his mother English. The Evangelical Dictionary of Christian Missions notes that:

Freeman was instrumental in starting churches and schools throughout two great African kingdoms, the Ashanti and the Dahomey, where the gospel was unknown. While he never learned the local language, he made friends of powerful Africans who said, “He understands our customs.” He was the first missionary to visit the great cities of gold, He also observed the brutal atrocities of the slave trade that he fought. He was a peacemaker among Africans and between England and African kingdoms. [p.372]

My thanks to Redcliffe College for providing a copy of this book for digitisation. This book is in the public domain. Further bibliographic resources on this missionary can be found on this page.

F. Deaville Walker [1878-1945], Thomas Birch Freeman. The Son of an African. London: Student Christian Movement, [1929]. Hbk. pp.221. [Click to download the complete book in PDF]

Contents

  • Author’s Preface
  • Map
  1. The Son of an African
  2. The Call of Africa
  3. Outward Bound
  4. The Gold Coast When Freeman Landed
  5. The Valley of the Shadow of Death
  6. Establishing rthe Gold Coast Mission
  7. Through the Forest to Kumasi
  8. Received by the Ashanti King
  9. In the City of Blood
  10. A Year of Hard Work
  11. Five Months in England
  12. New Hopes, New Sorrows
  13. Clearing a Path Through the Primeval Forest
  14. Planting the Church in Kumasi
  15. Progress and Trials
  16. To the Slave Coast and Abeokuta
  17. With the King of the Dahomey
  18. Fourteen Busy Years
  19. Sixteen Years in Retirement
  20. Freeman in Old Age Returns to the Work
  • An Epilogue
  • Index

Alexander Duff Pioneer of Missionary Education

William Paton [1886-1943], Alexander Duff. Pioneer of Missionary EducationWilliam Paton’s 1928 biography of Alexander Duff focuses on his work as a missionary educationalist in India. My thanks to Redcliffe College for providing a copy of this book for digitisation. This book is in the public domain.

William Paton [1886-1943], Alexander Duff. Pioneer of Missionary Education. London: Student Christian Movement, 1923. Hbk. pp.240. [Click to download complete book in PDF]

Contents

  • Author’s Preface
  1. Introductory
  2. Boyhood
  3. St. Andrews Under Chalmers: The Missionary Movement
  4. India – The Choice of a Method
  5. How the Method Worked
  6. A New Educational Policy for India
  7. Back in Scotland
  8. A Growing Work
  9. The Disruption of the Scottish Church
  10. A Diversity of Labours
  11. Scotland, America, and Indian Reform
  12. The Mutiny – Farewell to India
  13. Last Years
  14. The Christian Educationalist
  15. The Man Himself
  • Index

Author’s Preface

Some apology is needed for the appearance of a new sketch of the life of Alexander Duff, especially as the present writer cannot lay claim to any special sources of information which were not available when the earlier biographies were written. The reader will not find in this book fresh light on Duff, except in so far as the course of events in itself proves a man’s work and makes clear its strength and weakness. It is, however, precisely for this reason that such a new attempt to estimate this famous missionary’s life and personality may be considered not untimely. To those who are interested in Indian affairs it is a familiar fact that the whole system of education is in the melting-pot, and this is at least as true of Christian education as of the wider national system. [Continue reading]

Life Story of Lucy Evangeline Guinness

Lucy Guinness KummKarl Wilhelm Kumm [1874-1930] and Lucy Evangeline [Guinness] [1865-1906] were founders

…of the Sudan United Mission (SUM) Kumm, born in Wiesbaden, Germany, felt called to missionary work among Muslims. He was serving with the North Africa Mission in Egypt when, in 1899, he met Henry Grattan Guinness, the celebrated evangelist, and his daughter, Lucy. Lucy Guinness was known as a writer and editor, and a Christian worker in London’s East End. She and Kumm were married in Cairo early in 1900; two sons were born, in 1901 and 1902. [Biographical Dictionary of Christian Missions, p.378].

This book was written by Lucy’s father following her early death from the complications of a miscarriage. My thanks to All Nations Christian College for the loan of this book. This copy was previously owned by a member of the Guinness family and I have left the personal note on the frontispiece intact. This title is in the public domain.

Harry Grattan Guinness [1835-1910], Lucy Guinness Kumm. Her Life Story. London: Marshall & Scott & Regions Beyond Missionary Union, 1907. Hbk. pp.93. [Click to download complete book in PDF]

Contents

Lucy Guinness Kumm:

  • Her Life Story

Extracts From Her Writings

  • Poems
  • The Search Light of Posterity
  • Only a Factory Girl
  • “Mountains of God”
  • Ant-Heroes
  • “I Will Seek That Which Was Lost”
  • The Opium Curse and Conflict
  • India
  • “He Finished ‘All’

Part 1: Her Life Story

We called her Lucy-from lux, lumiere, light-hoping that God would make her alight to those in darkness; and Evangeline, angel, or messenger of good tidings, desiring that such she might become. From the first she was a. delicate child, not a. blooming rose, but a pale flower; not a. hardy, vigorous plant, but frail like a clinging woodbine that hangs its blossom on a supporting bough. And yet she proved in riper days to possess a spirit of independence along with that clinging affection which seemed to me to be her leading feature. When a tiny child there was no place she loved better than her father’s arms, and to him the delicacy of her frame and sensitiveness of her mind were no mystery, for trials which had preceded her birth in July, 1865, seemed their explanation. [Continue reading]

Robert Henderson Missionary to Gujarat, India

John Sinclair Stevenson [1868-1930], Robert Henderson. The Story of a Missionary Greatheart in IndiaThe story of Robert Henderson’s missionary work in Gujarat is told by one of colleagues following his tragic death whilst on furlough in Northern Ireland. My thanks to Redcliffe College for providing a copy of this book for digitisation. This title is in the public domain.

John Sinclair Stevenson [1868-1930], Robert Henderson. The Story of a Missionary Greatheart in India. London: James Clarke & Co., Ltd., 1922. Hbk. pp.160. [Click to download the complete book in PDF]

Contents

  1. Early Years
  2. Home Ministry
  3. Missionary Apprenticeship
  4. Borsad
  5. At Work
  6. Every-day Incidents
  7. Growth of the Church
  8. The Great Famine
  9. Sunrise After Storm
  10. Back Again to Borsad
  11. A Master Builder
  12. Two Under-Shepherds
  13. After-Care
  14. Farm Colonies
  15. Lights and Shadows
  16. Good-bye to Borsad
  17. On Furlough
  18. Double Duty
  19. Surat
  20. The Valley of the Shadow
  21. The Road Home

Preface

Robert Henderson, whose life story is told in the following pages, held a unique place in the hearts of his fellow missionaries. “He was the loved of all,” and when the sad story of his tragic death reached them, they felt for the moment that all the sunshine of life had departed. He was altogether lovable and wherever he went he created an atmosphere of love and goodwill. Everyone was drawn to him, and his friends both in India and Ireland were very numerous. The coronet which Lowell placed on the brow of the Swiss naturalist, Agassiz, that “where’er he met a stranger there he left a friend,” might have been placed on Robert Henderson’s brow also. He had, too, a richly endowed, many-sided nature. His gifts, both intellectual and practical, were very striking. [Continue reading]

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