Twelve Mighty Missionaries by Esthme Ethelind Enock [1874-1947]

Esthme Ethelind Enock [1874-1947], Twelve Mighty MissionariesEsthme Enock’s biographical sketches of 12 famous missionaries has just entered the public domain. This copy was kindly provided by Book Aid for digitisation.

In the table of contents below I have linked to the bibligraphy pages on Missiology.org.uk, where you will find further material on each missionary.

Esthme Ethelind Enock [1874-1947], Twelve Mighty Missionaries. London: Pickering & Inglis, Ltd., 1936. Hbk. pp.95. [Click to visit the download page]

Contents

  1. Pastor Hsi, China
  2. James Chalmers, New Guinea
  3. Alexander Mackay, Uganda
  4. Anthony Norris Groves, India
  5. Alexander Duff, India
  6. John Williams, Erromanga
  7. Samuel Marsden, Maoriland
  8. Samuel Pollard, China
  9. Hudson Taylor, China
  10. C.T. Studd, Central Africa
  11. Dan Crawford, Central Africa
  12. Dr Richard Williams, Tierra Del Fuego

Chapter 1. Pastor Hsi, China

The exact date of Pastor Hsi’s birthday does not seem to be recorded, but he was born probably in the Autumn of 1836. Till he was seven years old the little Hsi lived the usual free life of the son of a Chinese scholar, and was encouraged in every way to be overbearing and self-willed. Then he was sent to school, a school where a shrine of Confucius occupied the place of honour. Here the boy begins the studies which, it is hoped, will make him a “Princely Man.”

But, favourable though circumstances are, they do not satisfy the heart of this boy. At the early age of eight years, as he wandered through the incense-filled Temple and gazed at the hideous idols and vivid representations of punishments and terrors beyond the grave, he would ask himself, what was the use of living. “Men find no good, and in the end—?” he said to himself….

History of the Church Missionary Society by Eugene Stock – 4 Vols

Eugene Stock [1836-1928], The History of the Church Missionary Society. Its Environment, Its Men and Its Work, 4 Vols. Eugene Stock’s comprehensive History of the Church Missionary Society runs to 2,740 pages and 4 Volumes. My thanks to the Cambridge Centre for Christianity Worldwide for providing a set of these volumes to scan. These titles are in the pubic domain.

Eugene Stock [1836-1928], The History of the Church Missionary Society. Its Environment, Its Men and Its Work, 4 Vols. London: Church Missionary Society, 1899-1916. Hbk. pp.504 + 659 + 912 + 665. [Click to visit the download page for this set]

Table of Contents, Volumes 1-3

  • Preface
  • Author’s Preface
  • Outline of the Work
  1. The Great Commission
  2. Missions Before the Reformation
  3. Missions After the Reformation
  4. The Eighteenth Century and the Evangelical Revival
  5. Africa and the East – Waiting
  6. The Missionary Awakening
  7. The New Society and its Early Struggles
  8. The First Missionaries
  9. Africa and India: Struggle and Victory
  10. Forward Steps
  11. Rousing the Country: The Associations
  12. C.M.S. and Other Societies
  13. Sierra Leone: The White Man’s Grave; The Black Man’s Life
  14. The Finished Course
  15. India: Entering the Opened Door
  16. Insular Missions: New Zealand, Ceylon, West India, Malta
  17. The Eastern Churches: Reports for their Revival
  18. The Outlook After Twenty-Five Years
  19. The Personnel of the Period
  20. The Environment of the Period
  21. India: Changes and Development
  22. India: Progress of the Missions
  23. The Negro on Both SIdes the Atlantic, Enslaved and Free
  24. Greek, Copt, Abyssinian, Zulu, Maori, Australian, Cree
  25. Henry Venn; And Survey of Men and Things
  26. The Society and the Church
  27. The Colonial and Missionary Episcopate
  28. New Zealand: The Bishop, the Colony, and the Mission
  29. New Enterprises in Africa: Niger Expedition, Yoruba Mission East Coast
  30. The Opening of China
  31. The Society’s Finances
  32. The Jubilee
  33. The Environment: Church Developments – Anglican
  34. The Environment: Church Developments – Evangelical
  35. The Society at Home
  36. Some Recruits from the Universities
  37. Islington College and its Men
  38. Church Organization: The Church of New Zealand
  39. West Africa: Three Missions and Three Bishops
  40. East Africa: The Missionaries and the Explorers
  41. Jerusalem and Constantinople: Jew, Turk, Christian
  42. India Under Dalhouse; and the Missions in the North
  43. India: The Missions in the South
  44. India: The Punjab – For England and For Christ
  45. India: The Mutiny – Its Victims and its Lessons
  46. India: The Great Controversy – Neutrality or Christianity?
  47. India: Missions After the Mutiny
  48. Ceylon’s Isle
  49. China: In Time of War and Tumults
  50. The Great Lone Land
  51. An Anxious Period: In the Society, and in the Church
  52. The Period: More Church Developments
  53. Salisbury Square
  54. Candidates of the Period
  55. The Native Churches: Self-supporting, Self-governing, Self-extending
  56. Ebb-Tide in Africa
  57. The Niger and its Black Bishop
  58. The Islands: Mauritius and Madagascar
  59. India: Rulers and Bishops of the Period
  60. India: Babus, Brahmos, Borderers
  61. India: Agencies Evangelistic and Pastoral
  62. India: Death and Life
  63. India: A Flag for Christ in the Punjab
  64. China: New Mission and Old
  65. The Land of the Rising Sun
  66. Lands of the Utmost West: Manitoba; Metlakahtla
  67. New Zealand: War, Apostasy, Fidelity
  68. Henry Venn’s Latter Days
  69. The Environment: Church Movements
  70. The Environment: Evangelistic and Spiritual Movements
  71. The Society: Missions, Men, Money
  72. The Society: Home Influence and Organization
  73. Africa: The Flowing Tide Again: Ilala – and After
  74. Uganda: The Call and the Response
  75. The Crescent and the Cross: Missions in Mohammedan Lands
  76. India: Dioceses of Calcutta and Bombay
  77. India: Diocese of Lahore
  78. India: Diocese of Madras
  79. India: The Hill Tribes
  80. India and Ceylon: The Bishops and the Society
  81. The Far East: Advance in China and Japan
  82. The Far West: The Church among the Red Indians
  83. The Epoch of 1880-82
  84. The Environment: Ecclesiastical, Controversial, Spiritual
  85. The Society A New Era of Progress
  86. Three Memorable Years. 1885, 1886, 1887
  87. Controversies Within and Attack from Without
  88. Recruits of the Period: Men and Women
  89. High Hopes and Sore Sorrows: West Africa and the Niger
  90. High Hopes and Sore Sorrows: East Africa and Uganda
  91. British East India; The Company, The Government, and the Missions
  92. India: The Men and their Work
  93. India: Some Features, Episodes, Incidents, and Controversies of the Period
  94. Lands of Islam: Egypt, Palestine, Arabia, Persia
  95. In the Indian and Southern Oceans: Ceylon, Mauritius, New Zealand
  96. China: Onward, Inward, – and Upward
  97. Japan: The Nation, the Mission, the Church
  98. The Red Indian Missions: Patterns of Zeal and Triumphs of Grace
  99. Missions at Congresses and Conferences
  100. Seven Years of the Policy of Faith
  101. The Church, the Society and the Cause
  102. The Society: Candidates, Controbutions, and the Three Years’ Enterprise
  103. The Four Years Abroad: Africa
  104. The Four Years Abroad: Asia
  105. In Memoriam
  106. Repice, Circumspice, Prospice

Christianity and the Asian Revolution

Rajah B. Manikam, editor. Christianity and the Asian RevolutionThis is a collection of articles about the “Asian Revolution”, that is, the political, economic, social and ideological changes that took place in East Asia in the 1930s, 40s and 50s.

This book is reproduced here by kind permission of the copyright holder, the World Council of Churches. My thanks to the Cambridge Centre for Christianity Worldwide for providing a copy for scanning.

Rajah B. Manikam, editor. Christianity and the Asian Revolution. India: The Joint East Asia Secretariat of the International Missionary Council and the World Council of Churches., 1954. Hbk. pp.293. [Click to visit download page]

Contents

  • Preface
  • Area and Population Chart

Section I: The Social Revolution in East Asia

  1. What is the Asian Revolution?
  2. The Political Situation
  3. Towards a Nw Economic Order
  4. The Changing Social Scene
  5. Contending Ideologies
  6. Christian Concern for the Asian Revolution

Section II: Resurgent Religions

  1. Patterns of Religious Resurgence in East Asia
  2. Resurgent Hinduism
  3. Buddhism on the March
  4. Islam Today
  5. New Religions in East Asia
  6. The Christian Approach to Non-Christian Religions

Section III: The Church in East Asia

  1. The Churches in the Asian Context
  2. The Churches at Work
  3. The Unfinished Task

Section III: The Church in East Asia

  1. Asian Churchmen Speak

Preface

The proposal to write this book was first discussed at the Ecumenical Study Conference for East Asia, held at Lucknow, India, in December 1952. The plan approved by the Conference was to issue an interpretative volume on “Christianity and the Asian Revolution” in preparation for the Second Assembly of the World Council of Churches. It was agreed that Christians in Asia should contribute articles to this volume, and, that it should be edited by the undersigned in his capacity as the Joint Secretary for East Asia of the International Missionary Council and the World Council of Churches.

In using the term ‘Asian Revolution’, we have had in mind much more than the political changes in East Asia during the past twenty-five years. Revolutionary developments have affected every aspect of Asian society. Political, economic, social and ideological changes are discussed in the first section of the book….