History of the Methodist Woman’s Foreign Missionary Society

Mrs M.A. Miller, History of the Woman's Foreign Missionary Society of the Methodist ChurchMrs M.A. Miller was well qualified to write a history of the Woman’s Foreign Missionary Society, having served with them since its foundation in 1879. My thanks to Redcliffe College for providing me with a copy of the book to digitise. This title is in the public domain.

Mrs M.A. Miller, History of the Woman’s Foreign Missionary Society of the Methodist Church. Pittsburg, PA: Woman’s Foreign Missionary Society, 1896. Hbk. pp.140. [Click to download complete book in PDF]

Contents

  • Prefatory Note
  • Introduction
  • History of the Woman’s Foreign Missionary Society of the Methodist Church

This book came with a bonus item enclosed – a tract written by Mrs Miller entitled:

Mrs Brush’s Visit to the Branch Treasurer [Click to download in PDF]

Introduction

To any one that knows the author of this volume, it is needless to say that in preparing it for the press she performed a labor of love. Associated with the Woman’s Foreign Missionary Society of the Methodist Protestant Church from the beginning, one of the most devoted and laborious of its members, giving time and money, planning, praying, travelling day and night in its service, rejoicing in its prosperity, sad, sometimes with weeping, and sometimes with sorrow too deep for tears when unexpected hinderances tried the faith and hope of its members, she has waited and watched through all the years of its history for the accomplishment of its beneficent results.

And now she brings her latest offering to the cause–a volume, not to be estimated by the number of its pages or the costliness of its adorning, but by the patient research, the painstaking endeavor to give accurate information, the interesting nature of the facts collected, arranged and preserved for future reference, the stimulus that such facts must prove to those that are enlisted in the cause, and the encouraging review it presents of the results of labors begun in feebleness, but made effective by Divine power, notwithstanding the almost continuous struggle with difficulties which the Society had to maintain. [Continue reading]