History of Anglican Missions in North India

Cover: C.F. Andrews [1871-1940], North India. Handbooks of English Church Expansion

This is a brief history of the work of Anglican missions in North India up to around 1908. My thanks to Redcliffe College for making a copy of this public domain title available for digitisation.

C.F. Andrews [1871-1940], North India. Handbooks of English Church Expansion. London & Oxford: A.R. Mowbray & Co. Ltd., 1908. Hbk. pp.243. [Click to visit the download page for this title]

Contents

  • General Preface
  • Editor’s Preface
  • Author’s Preface
  1. Early Days in Bengal
  2. Calcutta and Its Bishops
  3. Chhota Nagpur and Mass Movements
  4. Father Goreh
  5. The Oxford Mission
  6. Allahabad, Cawmpore, and Dehli
  7. The Panjab and Islam
  8. Amritsar and the Sikhs
  9. The Frontier Missions
  10. The Indian Point of View
  11. The National Movement
  • Appendix A. Modern Krishna Worship
  • Appendix B. Literature Dealing with Mission Work in North India

Editor’s Preface

Few facts in modern history are more arresting or instructive than the rapid extension of the Church’s responsibilities and labours in the colonial and missionary fields; yet, until recently, few facts perhaps have been less familiar to those who have not deliberately given themselves to a study of the subject.

It has therefore been felt that the time has come when a series of monographs, dealing with the expansion of the Church of England beyond the seas, may be of service towards fixing the popular attention upon that great cause, the growing interest in which constitutes so thankworthy a feature in the Church’s outlook to-day.

The range of this series is confined to the work in which the Church of England is engaged. That story is too full to allow of any attempt to include the splendid devotion, and the successful labours, of other Missions of Christendom. But, for a fair work, a knowledge of those Missions is essential; and it is in the hope of leading some of its readers to such further comparative study that this series has been taken in hand.

The Editors have tried to keep in view the fact that, while the wonderful achievements here recorded have been accomplished in large part through the agency of our Missionary Societies, yet these Societies are, after all, only the hands and arms of the Holy Church in the execution of her divine mission to the world…

Pages vii-viii.