Problem of Africa’s Evangelisation

Douglas M. Thornton [1873-1907], Africa Waiting or The Problem of Africa's EvangelisationDouglas M. Thornton wrote this book to draw attention to the extent of the unfinished task of the evangelisation of Africa. The book also includes a bibliography of 19th Century books on Africa. My thanks to Redcliffe College for providing me with a copy of the book to digitise. This title is in the public domain.

Douglas M. Thornton [1873-1907], Africa Waiting or The Problem of Africa’s Evangelisation. London: Student Volunteer Missionary Union, 1897. Hbk. pp.148. [Click to download the complete book in PDF]

Contents

  • Preface
  • An African Bibliography
  1. The Geography of Africa
  2. Native Races, Languages, and Religions
  3. North Africa, Egypt and Abyssinia
  4. Negro-Land: The Great Sudan
  5. Bantu-Land: Central Africa
  6. South Africa and British Central Africa
  7. The Slave Trade and the Drink Traffic
  8. The Evangelization of Africa

Appendices

  • A. Rules for the Preservation of Health in the Tropics
  • B. Bible Translations (1837-1897)
  • C. West African Missionary Statistics
  • D. The Modern Marvel of Missions

Preface

The sole object in preparing this little book is to call the attention of Christians generally, and students in particular, to the problem of Africa’s evangelization. Issuing as it does from the British Student Volunteer Missionary Union, as a text-book upon Africa, its scope naturally includes all Protestant missionary effort. Nothing, however, but lack of opportunity for further study has caused the omission of the consideration of modern Romish Missions in Africa.

Though intended primarily for the use of members of Missionary Bands, Lay Workers’ and Helpers’ Unions, Watchers’ Bands, Christian Endeavourers, &c., it is hoped that it will also prove of value to the Christian public and to African Missionaries. Nothing of the kind, so far as we know, is to be found in print. There is an abundance of general works upon Africa, but none that we have seen solely from a missionary standpoint. [Continue reading]