Glances at China by Rev. Gilbert Reid

Gilbert Reid [1857-1927], Glances at China

Glances at China is a profusely illustrated overview of China and its people, clearly written with Christian missionary activity there in mind. My thanks to to Redcliffe College for providing me with a copy of this book to scan. This title is in the public domain.

Gilbert Reid [1857-1927], Glances at China. London: The Religious Tract Society, [1892]. Hbk. pp.191. [This material is in the Public Domain]

Contents

  1. The First Step at China
  2. Life in a Chinese Treaty-Port
  3. The Food Eaten in Cathay
  4. The Chinese New Year’s Day
  5. The Chinese Feast of Lanterns
  6. The Story of a Chinese Teacher
  7. A Christian Wedding With Chinese Appendages
  8. A Visit to the City of Ningpo
  9. Travelling in China
  10. The Romance of a Chinese Inn
  11. The Salams and Ceremony of Itineration in China
  12. Chinese Christians Among the Mountains
  13. An Amateur Itineration in China
  14. The Religions of China
  15. Three Important Chinese Dynasties
  16. A Visit to the Great Wall of China
  17. The Imperial City of Peking
  18. From Treaty-Port to Provincial Captial
  19. Life in the Interior of China
  20. The Missionary in Chinese Costume
  21. First Experience With Chinese Mandarins
  22. Near Death’s Door in a Heathen Land
  23. Missionary Work Amid the Memories of China’s Sages
  24. A Missionary’s First Visitt to a Chinese Governor
  25. A Sacred Mountain in China
  26. First Attempt at Translation in China
  27. A Story of Riots
  28. Progressive China
  29. Mission Work in the Cities of China
  30. Chinese Attack on an American Missionary
  31. Death of Dr. Mackenzie
  32. A Peep into Chinese Politics
  33. The Telegraph in China
  34. Christianity the Great Need of China
  35. Mission Work in Cathay

Chapter 1: Peeps into China

China’s chief port, the city of Shanghai, consisting of the Chinese city proper, with a population of nearly 400,000, and the English and French ‘ concessions ‘ with 5000 foreigners and about 500,000 Chinese-Shanghai within the wall and Shanghai without the wall-has various kinds of Christian and missionary work. Different denominations of different countries here vie with each other, in the spirit of union, trying not only to break the rush of heathenism, but the brazen vices of the foreigners, many of whom ‘tarry but for a night.’ Of all this work, two samples may be given-one, at the time of visiting it, being the largest Sunday school in China, and the other the largest Mission Press in the world. [Continue reading]