History of the Presbyterian Mission to China and Formosa

James Johnston [1819-1905], China and Formosa. The Story of the Mission of the Presbyterian Church of England

This is a well-illustrated history of the work of the English Presbyterian mission in China and Formosa (now Taiwan). My thanks to the Cambridge Centre for Christianity Worldwide for providing a copy of this rare public domain title for digitisation.

James Johnston [1819-1905], China and Formosa. The Story of the Mission of the Presbyterian Church of England. London: Hazell, Watson & Viney, Ltd., 1897. Hbk. pp.400. [Click to visit the download page for this title]

Contents

  • Preface
  1. Origin of the China Mission of the Presbyterian Church of England
  2. The Mission Field
  3. The People and Their Disposition Towards Us
  4. The Practical Religion of the Chinese
  5. The Planting of the Mission
  6. Times of Blessing
  7. The Story of the Amoy Mission
  8. The Story of the Shatow Mission
  9. The Story of the Formosa Mission
  10. A Retrospect
  11. Looking Forward
  12. The Story of the Amoy Mission (continued)
  13. The Story of the Amoy Mission (continued)
  14. The Story of the Shatow Mission (continued)
  15. The Story of the Shatow Mission (continued)
  16. The Story of the Formosa Mission (continued)
  17. The Story of the Formosa Mission (continued)
  18. The Story of the Singapore Mission
  19. Facts and Reflections
  20. Other Missions in China
  • Appendix
  • Index

Preface

In writing the history of the Mission of the Presbyterian Church of England during the last fifty years, at the request of several of its Missionaries, and with the approval of the Committee, my great aim has been to bring the remote near, and to make the strange familiar. To do this I have endeavoured, by descriptions of the country and its people, to bring the field of labour, and the nature of the work, before the minds of our people at home, and by allowing the Missionaries to tell their own tale of difficulties, trials, and sorrows, and of triumphs, encouragements, and joys, in their own words, to bring them near to the hearts of all interested in the progress of the kingdom of God in heathen lands.

In this my chief difficulty has been the modest reserve of the Missionaries in all that was personal…

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