Africa Inland Mission Work in Central Africa

Daniel Morison Miller [1888-1965], Central Africa Revisited. A 16,000 Mile Tour Thoughout the Fields of the Africa Inland Mission in Kenya, Tanganyika, Uganda, Congo, Sudan and EgyptDaniel Miller [1888-1965] was the Deputation and Editorial Secretary of the Africa Inland Mission (A.I.M.). In the 1930s he undertook a 16,000 mile tour of A.I.M. stations in Africa and this book records what he found. My thanks to the team at Africa Inland Missions’ UK office who established that no living descendant of the author could be located. If anyone knows who might have inherited the rights to this title, please contact me. My thanks to Redcliffe College for providing me with a copy of the book to scan.

Daniel Morison Miller [1888-1965], Central Africa Revisited. A 16,000 Mile Tour Thoughout the Fields of the Africa Inland Mission in Kenya, Tanganyika, Uganda, Congo, Sudan and Egypt. London: Africa Inland Mission / London & Edinburgh: Marshall, Morgan & Scott, [1938]. Hbk. pp.121. [Click to download complete book in PDF]

Contents

  • Preface
  • Foreword
  1. Africa Through the Years
  2. The Journey Out
  3. Through Mountainous Kenya
  4. The Eldoret Area
  5. In Western Tanganyika
  6. Across the Waterways of Uganda
  7. Back in the Belgian Congo
  8. Through Egypt Via Upper and Lower Sudan
  9. The Goal
  • Epilogue

From the Dust Jacket

A record of a 16,000 mile tour through East and Central Africa. The scenes are vividly portrayed and include descriptions of:- Kenya, with its lofty mountains and picturesque tribes; the Eldoret Area on the edge of the rift valley populated by the “Cliff-dwellers” and other nomadic tribes; Tanganyika with its peace loving Basukumu, living among fantastic rocks and rolling plains. Crossing  Uganda, with its numerous waterways, a pause is made in the West Nile district to review a remarkable piece of missionary work; then follows a description of the Belgian Congo in its tropical setting, inhabited by a great variety of people. The writer turning homewards follows the winding course of the White Nile for 1,300 miles to Khartoum; crosses the scorching desert to the rainless area around Shellal, through Egypt and thus home. [Continue reading]